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Author Topic: How Do I Ship a Portfolio of Prints  (Read 4444 times)
HSakols
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« on: January 22, 2013, 08:57:46 AM »
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Hi,
I was just contacted by my old high school that is celebrating their 30th anniversary. I was part of the first graduating class and partially developed my interest in photography while a student.  Now they are paying for me to come out and show my photography.  I would like to ship maybe 10 - 15 matted prints that are at the most 22x28 inches.  Could someone please recommend a solid shipping container that won't break the bank? 

I'm still not sure how I am going to show my prints.  I really don't want to have to frame them all.  I'd prefer just having a small group of interested folks and just pull them out of the box only matted. Framing is one reason why I have never had a show.  Again I welcome suggestions.

Hugh

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langier
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2013, 01:27:16 PM »
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If it's a small group you are showing to, why not use an iPad connected to an HDTV?

Simply save your images at 1080x1920, renumber them in order and transfer to your iPad. On an HDTV, photos don't look too shabby, IMO!

What about simply taking your master files (of course, I'm assuming these prints are from digital files), print them as smaller images and then have them bound as a book that you can take with you? If they are silver or C-prints, you can easily copy them with your digital camera and then optimize them for electronic display.

I've given up several years ago in matting or framing my work for a presentation, unless it's for a show. Sometimes, large images with wide borders work fine with push pins in the corner. My audience isn't hung-up on framing or presentation, they want to just see the photos!

I don't have the money, time, space for all the boards. My way of showing work is either as a hand-made book, on the iPad as a presentation that can be both viewed and projected/connected to a HDTV, as an 11x8.5 folio (as in Lens Work and Dane Creek), or in a group, as a finished image presented two at a time with my reusable standardized presentation boards (30x20 Sintra board with dual window openings and photo corners that allow swapping out my prints quickly and easily).

Most people viewing your work couldn't care less that they are your special portfolio and 22x28, they really want to see your work and as long as the color and contrast is pleasing and not harsh (unless that's your style), how you share isn't as critical as simply sharing the work.

Another thought is to create a large Blurb (or similar) POD book. The images will be pleasing color/tone and won't have the depth of the original but how many of your audience would ever know?
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Larry Angier
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Editor emeritus, NorCal Quarterly

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HSakols
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2013, 06:16:09 PM »
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Larry,
Thanks for your thoughts.  Yes, I like the idea of viewing on a HD TV. I have seen beautiful Mag Cloud photography books, one made by Charlie Cramer. Still you got love prints!
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langier
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2013, 07:08:38 PM »
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Hi Hugh,

Nothing like the tactile feel and look of prints, but for practicality and most viewers, hooking up a iPad to an HDTV is much easier than shlepping a portfolio of prints to show your friends, most of whom can't tell a snap shot from a well-crafted print. The HDTV will give you nice impact, especially if it's a large panel.

I delivered thirty six prints to a museum a couple of weeks ago and while I was there, I pitched them on another show, all shown on the iPad. The images are all crafted and ready to go, but I didn't want to print them up until I got a date or location. Now all we need to decide upon is the number of images and the date. It will probably take me about a day to print them out and prepare them for their mounting and framing.

A good, personal lap-size image for personal print sharing/viewing is a 5x7 image on 8x10 or 8x10 on 11x14 (for larger laps!). The iPad fits the former for the 21st century with no risk to spills, finger prints or dinging the mounts or print edges!

Have a great time sharing your images to your friends,
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Larry Angier
ASMP, NAPP, ACT, and many more!

Webmaster, RANGE magazine
Editor emeritus, NorCal Quarterly

web--http://www.angier-fox.photoshelter.com
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Deardorff
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2013, 09:54:29 AM »
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If any of those attending decide they would like to purchase a print you already have them there for the deal to be done.
There are box companies that specialize in shipping boxes for mounted and framed prints. They are not cheap.

You can make your own shipping boxes with wood pieces and plywood covers. Make them sized to hold your work snug with padding around it and between the prints as well. You put the cover no with screws the receipient takes out and saves for re-packing them to ship back.

You can paint or stain the plywood to your taste. If you get oak or maple or cherry faced plywood you can have a beautiful and solid shipping container to be re used for years to come.

When shipping, use acrylic glazing rather than glass. Tru Vue Optium is a museum grade that is clear and looks as if there is nothing in front of the artwork. It is anti-static and difficult to scratch. Worth looking at as it shows artwork at its best.

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