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Author Topic: Bummed about the Z3100 44"  (Read 2732 times)
Sal Baker
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« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2013, 09:50:39 PM »
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I have several friends who are engineers at HP.  The company mostly cares about big interprise systems; hardware software and large flash drives.  Last year they almost got out of the PC business so it's easy to guess that the small market for pro graphic/photographic printers will fade away once consumables and parts sales drop below a given level.  It's great to see that Canon is finally holding Epson's feet to the fire in this market segment.

Sal
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Mark Lindquist
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« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2013, 10:47:01 PM »
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Yeah, but are any of them including the embedded spectrometer?  Not so much, and it's the absolute innovation so desperately need with all of these printers...
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aaronchan
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« Reply #22 on: January 26, 2013, 12:12:12 AM »
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I don't know why built-in spectrometer is a huge advantage to you.
I have 5 printers working in my lab ( 1 Z3200)
I have an i1pro which I use that for all of my printers besides the z3200.
of cuz, the z3200 broke down few times and i STILL have my i1 to make everything work.
also, what if I have 5 Z3200, that means I have 5 spectro in one location?
I dont that that is necessary at all

aaron
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zippski
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« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2013, 01:00:42 AM »
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I have an i1pro which I use that for all of my printers besides the z3200 because it doesn't need an i1pro. 

FIFY

Leigh
zippski
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2013, 09:16:10 AM »
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also, what if I have 5 Z3200, that means I have 5 spectro in one location?
I dont that that is necessary at all

aaron

That is right, on the other hand the calibration makes use of the spectrometer too and keeps your profiles usable for a longer time. To get that done manually will not take much time either but is so damned convenient when the printer does it in idle time. Even then you would need an external spectrometer an entry to the driver or firmware to get that calibration data effective or use a RIP, all more or less what Epson allows on calibration. The calibration on the Canon iPFs depends on density measurements instead of spectrometer readings if I recall it correctly, which is less accurate. I agree that a Z model stripped of the profiling functions and profiling software but calibration enabled would be a nice companion to a normal Z model. Price accordingly lowered of course. In another thread the price of a replacement Z spectrometer part is said to be $329, it will not be more than $150 when the printer is assembled, hardly something to strip too. Pricing is much more a marketing thing than what the sum of the parts create and should cut say $700 off the normal printer's price. The alternative route; Epson's and Canon's optional spectrometer components for the most recent models are way more expensive if one counts profiling software in as well.

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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.
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Mark Lindquist
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« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2013, 09:58:06 AM »
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I don't know why built-in spectrometer is a huge advantage to you.
I have 5 printers working in my lab ( 1 Z3200)
I have an i1pro which I use that for all of my printers besides the z3200.
of cuz, the z3200 broke down few times and i STILL have my i1 to make everything work.
also, what if I have 5 Z3200, that means I have 5 spectro in one location?
I dont that that is necessary at all

aaron

Your lab is a big outfit Aaron.  For the on again, off again printer, the spectrometer is perfect.  I have no use for another 44" printer, and only have an Epson 4800 Pro for sheet fed work, all of which I have had custom profiles made.  I don't want to futz with profile making devices - the Z3100 was/is perfect in that regard.  It's one of the strong points of the printer, in addition to the drip system which keeps clogs in check.  I'm talking about use for an artist who is doing their own work.  Granted, my studio is 15,000 sq. ft., and hypothetically, having a few Z3100s spread out, in different rooms, a spectrometer in each machine would be pretty nice.  (Remember, an artist (not a lab) can fool around with being super picky about the work.  I usually make a custom profile on my Z3100 frequently, mainly because the humidity conditions are constantly changing in this large loft, and also, because it's just easy with the Z3100.  No brainer easy.) Most labs keep their printers bundled in one room, close together, but an independent artist may not necessarily do it that way.  We all have different requirements, and I understand yours.  Thanks for your comments -  Smiley
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Mark Lindquist
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« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2013, 10:06:19 AM »
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That is right, on the other hand the calibration makes use of the spectrometer too and keeps your profiles usable for a longer time. To get that done manually will not take much time either but is so damned convenient when the printer does it in idle time. Even then you would need an external spectrometer an entry to the driver or firmware to get that calibration data effective or use a RIP, all more or less what Epson allows on calibration. The calibration on the Canon iPFs depends on density measurements instead of spectrometer readings if I recall it correctly, which is less accurate. I agree that a Z model stripped of the profiling functions and profiling software but calibration enabled would be a nice companion to a normal Z model. Price accordingly lowered of course. In another thread the price of a replacement Z spectrometer part is said to be $329, it will not be more than $150 when the printer is assembled, hardly something to strip too. Pricing is much more a marketing thing than what the sum of the parts create and should cut say $700 off the normal printer's price. The alternative route; Epson's and Canon's optional spectrometer components for the most recent models are way more expensive if one counts profiling software in as well.

--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.

You are correct on all counts Ernst, particularly saying it is "so damned easy" to make custom profiles with the Z, and they are automagically loaded.  I think I'm talking myself into an expensive repair.  The advantages of the Z are making me want to keep it.  Sometimes rants have a purpose I guess.  If I remember correctly, you also have a Z3200, correct?  Do you see any advantages of the Z 3200 over the Z3100?  Any disadvantages?

Thanks, Ernst -

Met vriendelijke groet
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2013, 03:56:21 PM »
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The Z3200 has the wider, heavier gamut that most like, the Z3100 the more linear B&W output.
Z3200 is a bit faster, the Color Center profiling software improved, possibly the plain Z3200 allows longer print lenghts than the plain Z3100.

Ernst, op de lei getypt.
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