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Author Topic: Street photography & cameras.  (Read 23883 times)
AFairley
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« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2013, 01:39:49 PM »
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Not over here, Russ. What crime would he have committed in the US?

Jeremy

Civil tort of trespass to chattels (that's when I touch your personal property without your permission) or conversion (that's interfering with your possession of your personal property)?  However, the analog tort to one's body rather than possessions would be battery (defined as an unpermitted offensive touching), but there are plenty of situations where a cop can touch you or shove you without committing a battery even though you have not been "detained."  Likewise, there most likely are situations defined where a copy can interfere with your personal property, but I don't know what they are or how they are determined.  Let the topic drift begin....
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kikashi
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« Reply #41 on: February 06, 2013, 03:03:19 AM »
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Civil tort of trespass to chattels (that's when I touch your personal property without your permission) or conversion (that's interfering with your possession of your personal property)?  However, the analog tort to one's body rather than possessions would be battery (defined as an unpermitted offensive touching), but there are plenty of situations where a cop can touch you or shove you without committing a battery even though you have not been "detained."  Likewise, there most likely are situations defined where a copy can interfere with your personal property, but I don't know what they are or how they are determined.  Let the topic drift begin....

Torts aren't crimes and in any event "touching" the camera wouldn't come close to either trespass to a chattel or conversion.

Jeremy
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Rob C
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« Reply #42 on: February 06, 2013, 08:04:30 AM »
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Torts aren't crimes and in any event "touching" the camera wouldn't come close to either trespass to a chattel or conversion.

Jeremy


In a politically correct world, best not to use the word chattel at all, or one of the Ugly Sisters may get in touch. Almost as dangerous as holding a door open for someone!

;-)

Rob C
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AFairley
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« Reply #43 on: February 06, 2013, 08:51:05 AM »
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Torts aren't crimes and in any event "touching" the camera wouldn't come close to either trespass to a chattel or conversion.

Jeremy

Correct you are, since both of them require substantial interference, it's been a while since law school.
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RSL
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« Reply #44 on: February 06, 2013, 09:28:12 AM »
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Not over here, Russ. What crime would he have committed in the US?

Jeremy

You're right, Jeremy. I wrote in anger and in haste. Shouldn't have used the word "crime." It's at least a tort, but there are acts that would constitute a tort for a civilian that become a crime if a sworn officer commits them. A great deal depends on the situation, and I'm sure the so-called "occupy" events with their property damage, public urination, defecation, rape, etc., etc., were a pretty annoying and special situation for the cops.

In any case the question's going to make for an interesting discussion in the evening over drinks with my attorney son once I get home in the spring.

I have three books on photography and the law, but they're all back in Colorado Springs. Here's a brief excerpt from attorney and photographer Bert Krages's one-page PDF titled "The Photographer's Right":

"law enforcement officers may object to photography but most understand that people have the right to take photographs and do not interfere with photographers. They do have the right to keep you away from areas where you may impede their activities or endanger safety. However, they do not have the legal right to prohibit you from taking photographs from other locations. They Have Limited Rights to Bother, Question, or Detain You.

Although anyone has the right to approach a person in a public place and ask questions, persistent and unwanted conduct done without a legitimate purpose is a crime in many states. . ."
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stamper
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« Reply #45 on: February 07, 2013, 04:00:30 AM »
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This broadly is the same as the UK and is commonsense imo . I have a small booklet published by a camera magazine that is titled ... Know your Rights. I will in future carry it with me and if challenged then I can produce it and it might help avoid any hassle.
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PhillyPhotographer
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« Reply #46 on: February 07, 2013, 03:29:03 PM »
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You have to find a camera that you're comfortable with using and that can be anything from a point and shoot compact camera to a medium format. There is no perfect camera so ignore the hype especially from the Leica camp unless you have very deep pockets. While they make fantastic cameras and lenses it won't make you a better street photographer.
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RSL
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« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2013, 04:49:14 PM »
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+1
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iluvmycam
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« Reply #48 on: March 05, 2013, 09:06:09 PM »
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M43, finest street cam on earth.
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PhillyPhotographer
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« Reply #49 on: March 05, 2013, 09:18:58 PM »
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Rolling eyes.
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RSL
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« Reply #50 on: March 06, 2013, 11:16:25 AM »
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M43, finest street cam on earth.

A cluster bomb?
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Gulag
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« Reply #51 on: March 10, 2013, 08:29:25 PM »
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Chip Simone, one of our local photographer, tends to use his D700 with Nikon 60 AFD Micro all the time for his  street photography stuff.

http://www.jacksonfineart.com/artist_exhibit.php?id=332&exhibitid=155
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“For art to be art it has to cure.”  - Alejandro Jodorowsky
gerafotografija
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« Reply #52 on: March 12, 2013, 09:49:32 PM »
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Although the particular camera makes a difference, I would say that the most important prerequisite in street photography is to be there, followed by don't forget to take the lens cap off.

Just for fun, I decided to compare what types of street photos I could get after a week of shooting with film vs. digital. Some days I took along an ancient battered Nikon F3 with 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor and Tri-X Pan pushed to 800; alternating with an Olympus OM-D E-M5 and Leica Summilux 25mm f/1.4.

I am attaching my two picks of the week below. More details on the experience on my blog, and some info on the SFMOMA Garry Winogrand retrospective here. I highly recommend this exhibition that just started last week to anyone who is serious about street photography, and anyone else who likes people photos.

It was a lot of fun, and in the end I don't want to choose one over the other. I also don't really feel the need to upgrade to the latest greatest compact camera (although the M240, RX-1 and X-100s are all so very tempting!).

What I really want is to have more time to go out and photograph people!
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menandar
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« Reply #53 on: March 19, 2013, 02:25:59 PM »
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To the end of the day the camera is just a tool for you to help you do what you do. And street photography doesn't always mean that you need to photograph peoples faces in a very uncomfortable manner  for both the photographer and the subject. Good photography is about been natural and relaxed and full with nice and meaningful content. I don't really enjoy very much the typical so call street photography photographs were the object is looking suspiciously at the lens, and with this the photographer potentially shows how good he/she is in doing street photography.  The photography is about content that make sense and tell story in a beautifully composed way. The camera is the last thing that we should be bother and the most important thing is to be on the right place at the right time so you can capture the images you want.
Then again before the camera, for me specially, the choice of lens is more important.
Any way everything is about content.

------------------------------------
http://mirchevphotography.com

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cjogo
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« Reply #54 on: March 25, 2013, 03:34:34 AM »
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If I  simply didn't want to use tripod ( mainly cause there was enough light )  I shot with a HAssy SWC from the hip.  Great DOF at f 16 and focused with the feet calibration on the lens  >>  or I used a Distagon 50mm with a waist level.
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Bob Brandoff
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« Reply #55 on: June 29, 2013, 01:48:17 PM »
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Although the particular camera makes a difference, I would say that the most important prerequisite in street photography is to be there..
What I really want is to have more time to go out and photograph people!

I have used several different cameras and settled on the Sony A77 with Sony 35mm 1.8, and this combination gives me flexibility to use manual lenses (focus peaking) and in low light (EVF) with little difficulty.





more on my website, http://www.digitalandfilm.com
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #56 on: June 29, 2013, 06:33:05 PM »
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If the idea is to use something small and inconspicuous, then any of the recent digital rangefinders that have come on the market would do the trick.  Sony RX1, any of the Fuji X series, the Leicas of course.

There was a recent article on the Adorama site addressing this very topic, http://www.adorama.com/alc/0013731/article/Digital-Cameras-for-Street-Photography-An-Opinionated-Buying-Guide.

Longer lenses can be useful for street, but not often.  Longer lenses aren't as conducive to the spontaneous style of street shooting.
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ripgriffith
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« Reply #57 on: June 30, 2013, 01:41:17 AM »
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Longer lenses can be useful for street, but not often.  Longer lenses aren't as conducive to the spontaneous style of street shooting.
This, from Wikipedia: "In science, the term observer effect refers to changes that the act of observation will make on a phenomenon being observed. This is often the result of instruments that, by necessity, alter the state of what they measure in some manner. A commonplace example is checking the pressure in an automobile tire; this is difficult to do without letting out some of the air, thus changing the pressure. This effect can be observed in many domains of physics.
The observer effect on a physical process can often be reduced to insignificance by using better instruments or observation techniques. However in quantum mechanics, which deals with very small objects, it is not possible to observe a system without changing the system, so the observer must be considered part of the system being observed.|"

Maybe one of the "better instruments" is the long lens, which, to some extent, removes the photographer from actually interacting with the group and thereby changing the dynamics of the group.
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Rob C
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« Reply #58 on: June 30, 2013, 03:56:23 AM »
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This, from Wikipedia: "In science, the term observer effect refers to changes that the act of observation will make on a phenomenon being observed. This is often the result of instruments that, by necessity, alter the state of what they measure in some manner. A commonplace example is checking the pressure in an automobile tire; this is difficult to do without letting out some of the air, thus changing the pressure. This effect can be observed in many domains of physics.
The observer effect on a physical process can often be reduced to insignificance by using better instruments or observation techniques. However in quantum mechanics, which deals with very small objects, it is not possible to observe a system without changing the system, so the observer must be considered part of the system being observed.|"

Maybe one of the "better instruments" is the long lens, which, to some extent, removes the photographer from actually interacting with the group and thereby changing the dynamics of the group.



Sensible and logical, but then it reduces the 'in your face' machismo of 'street' to nothing.

Worse, it really does introduce the concept of small-game hunting... is that cool?

;-)

Rob C
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ripgriffith
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« Reply #59 on: June 30, 2013, 04:39:39 AM »
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Sensible and logical, but then it reduces the 'in your face' machismo of 'street' to nothing.

Worse, it really does introduce the concept of small-game hunting... is that cool?

;-)

Rob C
Actually, it's more the concept of large primate hunting... way cool!  Wink   But seriously, I see nothing 'cool' about  'in your face' machismo of 'street'.  It's really quite objectionable, IMO, and in the neighborhoods where I come from (Brooklyn) and where I now live (Russia), will very likely get your camera placed somewhere that even an ISO of 128K won't get you a picture.
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