Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Yosemite: best view of Horsetail Fall?  (Read 3685 times)
cialowicz
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« on: January 29, 2013, 01:25:58 PM »
ReplyReply

Well, I'm "one of those guys" that will be heading up to Yosemite at the end of February in order to view Horsetail Fall lit up by the setting sun. I just moved to San Francisco (from Boston), so I figured this is one of those must-do things, as cliche as it is. I hope the weather cooperates.

My goal is to hike up a bit and get it from a higher vantage point, rather than the valley floor. Is anyone familiar with viewing opportunities from Four Mile Trail? Are there openings between the trees that allow for a clear view of the fall? How far up must one hike to get at them? Do other trails provide for better viewing opportunities?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Mike Cialowicz
http://500px.com/cialowicz
Logged
Frank Sirona
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 52



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2013, 04:59:00 PM »
ReplyReply

I tried it (as far as snow conditions permitted), and was disappointed. First, itīs very far from Horsetail, so youīd need a really long lens. Second itīs difficult to find a good spot to set up the camera, without trees in the foreground. And the use of chain saws is not permitted in Yosemite Valley, as far as I know. In any case you would be limited to a very narrow angle, determined not so much by how you would like to compose your shot, but by the conditions there instead. Finally, officially this trail is closed in winter, and for good reason. Getting up there with your equipment on the back will be dangerous when the trail is covered with snow and/or ice - not to mention the fact that you simply might not find your way. I should say, though, that I did not climb the second switchback - too much snow up there. However, I believe this would bring you too far away from the falls anyway.
Logged

Frank Sirona. Large format photography of the Desert Southwest.

www.franksirona.com
HSakols
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 388


« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2013, 05:36:19 PM »
ReplyReply

If you want a different view go to Taft Point.  It is only a 10 mile ski one way. 
Logged
Canon5D_
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 12



WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2013, 06:13:22 PM »
ReplyReply

I suggest posing your question at www.yosemitenews.info/forum for an answer.  This forum will provide you with exactly what you're looking for from a very learned/well tramped audience that knows Yosemite as well as I know the White Mountains of NH.
Logged

Roman Racela
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 239



« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2013, 08:57:12 PM »
ReplyReply

If you're able to get a spot among the hordes of photographers...El Capitan picnic area would be the best spot. Just follow where all the guys with tripods are going.
Logged
cialowicz
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2013, 09:41:37 PM »
ReplyReply

If you're able to get a spot among the hordes of photographers...El Capitan picnic area would be the best spot. Just follow where all the guys with tripods are going.

Problem is, if I do that, I'll just end up with the same image that all the hordes are getting.
Logged
HSakols
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 388


« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2013, 09:49:56 AM »
ReplyReply

Do you have Michael Fryes book - The Photographers Guide to Yosemite?  The problem is when this type of info is shared on the internet these places become just as crowded.  Your biggest challenge is going to be finding parking.  This event has become something like a rock concert.  Don't get me wrong, it is amazing when everything is just right.  I'd like to go just photograph photographers. 
Logged
Roman Racela
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 239



« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2013, 08:34:17 PM »
ReplyReply

I totally agree with you...but as much as it's a spectacular event, everybody already has a shot of Horsetail Falls glowing from every angle at the park conceivable. Unfortunately, there's very little chance that a photographer will get anything unique or different than others that are shooting the falls that day.  Sad

Problem is, if I do that, I'll just end up with the same image that all the hordes are getting.
Logged
BradSmith
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 269


« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2013, 02:08:37 AM »
ReplyReply

So what if the image has been taken by a lot of people?  The poster hasn't ever been there for it, just having moved to the Bay Area.  HE has never taken it, and the image is, I imagine, for HIM.  Just go get the shot that YOU want and stop worrying about whether or not anyone else on this planet has taken a very similar image.   It will be YOURS. 
Brad
Logged
HSakols
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 388


« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2013, 09:53:26 AM »
ReplyReply

It is definitely worth coming to the park this time of year.  I can't get enough of the winter light. Even if the horsetail falls is obscured by clouds there is plenty to photograph.  Just last weekend I was photographing at the Valley View Pullout. Not only did I get the grand scene in pinkish light, but there were wonderful frozen water droplets on the willows over the river.  If you come on the 15th make sure to see Michael Frye's exhibit at the Ansel Adams Gallery and if you come on the 22nd check out the Yosemite Renaissance opening at the Yosemite Museum.  Drive Safe.
 
Logged
Roman Racela
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 239



« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2013, 10:12:00 AM »
ReplyReply

I agree with HSakols. The winter scene and light at Yosemite is just wonderful. I too have a few shots from Valley View Pullout but didn't get the pink light at sunrise. Did you go at sunset by any chance? I'm going back there on Feb 22nd.




It is definitely worth coming to the park this time of year.  I can't get enough of the winter light. Even if the horsetail falls is obscured by clouds there is plenty to photograph.  Just last weekend I was photographing at the Valley View Pullout. Not only did I get the grand scene in pinkish light, but there were wonderful frozen water droplets on the willows over the river.  If you come on the 15th make sure to see Michael Frye's exhibit at the Ansel Adams Gallery and if you come on the 22nd check out the Yosemite Renaissance opening at the Yosemite Museum.  Drive Safe.
  
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 08:53:18 PM by Roman Racela » Logged
HSakols
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 388


« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2013, 05:30:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Roman,
I live only about 12 miles away.  Sometimes I will drive to Pohono Bridge and then just start walking to unwind after work.  Yes Valley View is best during sunset.
Logged
HSakols
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 388


« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2013, 08:48:27 AM »
ReplyReply

For those planning to come to the park you might want to read this.
http://www.michaelfrye.com/landscape-photography-blog/2013/01/31/horsetail-fall-questions/
Logged
Roman Racela
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 239



« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2013, 08:47:42 PM »
ReplyReply

You are one very lucky person to live so close!

Roman,
I live only about 12 miles away.  Sometimes I will drive to Pohono Bridge and then just start walking to unwind after work.  Yes Valley View is best during sunset.
Logged
dreed
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1291


« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2013, 06:51:48 PM »
ReplyReply

Problem is, if I do that, I'll just end up with the same image that all the hordes are getting.

That defines almost every photographic location in Yosemite.

Try not to think of it as just going to photograph something but also to see a rather spectacular natural phenomenon.

Do you have Michael Fryes book - The Photographers Guide to Yosemite?  The problem is when this type of info is shared on the internet these places become just as crowded.  Your biggest challenge is going to be finding parking.  This event has become something like a rock concert.  Don't get me wrong, it is amazing when everything is just right.  I'd like to go just photograph photographers.  

You mean like this?
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=62806.msg506144#msg506144

I tried it (as far as snow conditions permitted), and was disappointed. First, itīs very far from Horsetail, so youīd need a really long lens. Second itīs difficult to find a good spot to set up the camera, without trees in the foreground. And the use of chain saws is not permitted in Yosemite Valley, as far as I know. In any case you would be limited to a very narrow angle, determined not so much by how you would like to compose your shot, but by the conditions there instead. Finally, officially this trail is closed in winter, and for good reason. Getting up there with your equipment on the back will be dangerous when the trail is covered with snow and/or ice - not to mention the fact that you simply might not find your way. I should say, though, that I did not climb the second switchback - too much snow up there. However, I believe this would bring you too far away from the falls anyway.

Last year was a relatively dry winter and the 4 mile trail wasn't officially closed. I walked up it (a few times) as far as I could go (about where it reaches 7000'). On one occasion I broke a walking pole coming down as I slipped on ice. On another I took a photo looking back at El Capitan and I hate to say it but Horsetail Falls simply wasn't visible (see attached image.) It is behind that bit of rock that juts out.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2013, 11:53:18 PM by dreed » Logged
dreed
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1291


« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2013, 07:12:19 PM »
ReplyReply

My goal is to hike up a bit and get it from a higher vantage point, rather than the valley floor. Is anyone familiar with viewing opportunities from Four Mile Trail? Are there openings between the trees that allow for a clear view of the fall? How far up must one hike to get at them? Do other trails provide for better viewing opportunities?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Understand that the Horesetail Falls lights up just before the sun completely sets and that it starts to get dark quite quickly thereafter.

What this means is that if you're 2 miles up the 4 Mile Trail then you've got to walk down those two miles in near darkness with whatever headlamp(s)/torches you are carrying. I simply cannot recommend doing that to anyone at that time of year as it is just too dangerous.

Another poster suggested skiing out to Taft Point. Unless you want to cross country ski in the dark (or lit by headlamps/torches) for 10+ miles, you will need to camp out at Taft Point for the night and with that comes the complexities of camping in Yosemite.

My advice is to just go with the masses this year. If you want to find alternative locations, spend a week or two there in summer doing field research. Anything else and you're just inviting disaster.
Logged
dreed
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1291


« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2013, 12:05:40 PM »
ReplyReply

If you're thinking of going, wait until the cold front that is due in on Tuesday/Wednesday has passed. This is likely to mean that next Thursday through Saturday will make for good viewing due to the fresh precipitation if the clouds clear up and some snow melt starts to run.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad