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Author Topic: Love Real Street  (Read 12143 times)
jeremypayne
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« Reply #60 on: February 06, 2013, 06:02:50 AM »
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Jeremy, do you have anything to contribute to the thread or are you just here to practise your repertoire of one liners?

"Freedom's just another word for nothin' left to lose."

Enjoy your day, Stamper ... if that is your real name ...
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amolitor
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« Reply #61 on: February 06, 2013, 08:19:08 AM »
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I make no direct accusation, RedwoodGuy, but your intellectual posture is one I(and many of us) have seen before. It is a posture frequently held by people who are too lazy to understand their antecedents, and cling to the notion that they can simply intuit their way into doing wonderful art. So far you don't seem to have cited Mozart, thank goodness.

Anyways, I too will bow out of the conversation. Feel free to imply that I simply haven't the intellectual stuff to keep up with you.
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- Andrew

My awesome blog about photography: http://photothunk.blogspot.com
RSL
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« Reply #62 on: February 06, 2013, 08:58:42 AM »
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I'm all ears. Since this is the critique forum, please do pick a photograph I posted and expound on how photographic geometry works. I'd be delighted to hear about it. I find that naked assertions are far less valuable in a critique, don't you?

If you think you're going to learn about photography, or any art form for that matter, from verbal descriptions then it's clear you haven't a clue and that you're charging off in all directions at once. The way you learn about how graphical geometry works is to look at the best examples of it until you internalize at least something of what's involved. But that aside, none of your posted photographs so far would be fit subjects for an explanation in any case.
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Chris Sanderson
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« Reply #63 on: February 06, 2013, 09:37:51 AM »
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Please avoid personal attacks and abuse or the thread will be locked again
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Christopher Sanderson
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #64 on: February 06, 2013, 09:47:57 AM »
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If you think you're going to learn about photography, or any art form for that matter, from verbal descriptions then it's clear you haven't a clue and that you're charging off in all directions at once. The way you learn about how graphical geometry works is to look at the best examples of it until you internalize at least something of what's involved. But that aside, none of your posted photographs so far would be fit subjects for an explanation in any case.
This is a critique forum, and it was your claim that I knew nothing about photographic geometry. Obviously, it was regarding one of the photos I posted, else why would you say it?
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #65 on: February 06, 2013, 10:17:40 AM »
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I make no direct accusation, RedwoodGuy, but your intellectual posture is one I(and many of us) have seen before. It is a posture frequently held by people who are too lazy to understand their antecedents, and cling to the notion that they can simply intuit their way into doing wonderful art. So far you don't seem to have cited Mozart, thank goodness.

Anyways, I too will bow out of the conversation. Feel free to imply that I simply haven't the intellectual stuff to keep up with you.

Underhanded insults are no better than honest direct ones. When you begin by saying you are not making an accusation, then don't make an accusation. I'm lazy?  Tell me exactly what you would know about my work habits, or my intellectual rigor. Where did I indicate anywhere on these forums that I am 'intuiting my way into doing wonderful art?' Please, make the citation so we can see what you are talking about.

Why would you even attempt to make this kind of insult?

 
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Rob C
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« Reply #66 on: February 06, 2013, 11:24:42 AM »
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Charybdis and Scylla sing yet again, just like their cousins the Sirens.

Rob C
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Rob C
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« Reply #67 on: February 06, 2013, 11:28:24 AM »
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Jeremy, do you have anything to contribute to the thread or are you just here to practise your repertoire of one liners?


Hah!  Touche.


Let it slide, stamper; in the quest for brevity he even forgot the acute.

Touché!

;-)

Rob C
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 12:22:15 PM by Rob C » Logged

RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #68 on: February 06, 2013, 12:12:25 PM »
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SNAPSHOT OF Figures in shadow.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 04:01:24 PM by RedwoodGuy » Logged
RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #69 on: February 06, 2013, 12:13:11 PM »
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SNAPSHOT of Drummer
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 04:01:40 PM by RedwoodGuy » Logged
seamus finn
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« Reply #70 on: February 06, 2013, 03:58:23 PM »
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It seems to me that humour is another legitimate element in street photography. The first is an example of male multi-tasking. The second is, well, just fun when school's out. Both brought a smile for me - a small but priceless treasure on any given day.



« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 04:02:41 PM by seamus finn » Logged

RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #71 on: February 06, 2013, 04:10:08 PM »
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Recycle.

I managed to get this SNAPSHOT of a recycler.
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WalterEG
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« Reply #72 on: February 06, 2013, 04:40:04 PM »
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Recycle.

I managed to get this SNAPSHOT of a recycler.

To say nothing of George Bernard Shaw catching up on a spot of reading!!  LOL

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RSL
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« Reply #73 on: February 06, 2013, 05:01:47 PM »
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Now you've got the idea, Guy. That's a street photograph and a pretty darn good one.
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #74 on: February 06, 2013, 05:02:59 PM »
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@seamus
Indeed, I think both of your photos are humorous. I always enjoy children playing like that. I like the content and I like the ideas you had for the photographs. I have some problem with the density in both. The appearance is too dark and the shadows a bit muddled. That stuff is easily correctable, and I think you would have more pleasing images if you tried it. If it's just my screen, then of course ignore that comment. I like humorous street and I think you've done it.
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« Reply #75 on: February 06, 2013, 05:04:18 PM »
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It seems to me that humour is another legitimate element in street photography. The first is an example of male multi-tasking. The second is, well, just fun when school's out. Both brought a smile for me - a small but priceless treasure on any given day.

Humor certainly is, Seamus, as Elliott Erwitt has made clear to anybody familiar with his photographs. These are fun shots. Life isn't much without fun and funny.
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AFairley
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« Reply #76 on: February 06, 2013, 08:12:36 PM »
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OK, can someone give me a succinct definition of what "street" photography is?  From this thread it seems that I have been misapprehending.  I'll stick in two of mine...are they street or not, and why?
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #77 on: February 06, 2013, 08:50:57 PM »
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@Spring St. Photo--

The idea for this is sound. The photo is constructed well, but doesn't hold me long enough. It is a little bland as a palette of black and gray tones with some very dull color. The reflected image in the window would be a lot more fun if it was distorted by wavy glass or some other contrast adding reality at the time. The man inside is dull. Other windows, at other times with other effects can make photographs that have some visual appeal or more. This one doesn't have enough going on to hold me for long. I want more content! :-)

@We Buy Gold
This is way more fun. There's the nice geometric tile and deep shadows and some content to explore. The guy is a bit further away than ideal, so he almost works himself out of the photograph. I think the composition could be improved by raising the bottom edge until it comes to the corner of the white banner on the right side. There's no apparent humor or irony, or social comment, or odd juxtapositions here, so the interest level to me falls off somewhat quicker than other pictures like this that have more intellectual content, like irony. Another way to shoot this, considering the content that is there, would be in a deadpan style.

As to who claims what about street photography, I think the argument is meaningless to artists. People who write books like arguing over such stuff. If you are following your artistic center, it ought not matter which pigeon hole some one wants to stick it in.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 08:58:19 PM by RedwoodGuy » Logged
kencameron
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« Reply #78 on: February 06, 2013, 10:02:59 PM »
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...Yes, some artists may compete with each other...
When I think about the history of the art forms I know something about, or the lives ans writings of artists I have studied in detail, I find it difficult to think of any who haven't competed, in some sense, with those they consider to be their real peers, whether contemporaries or predecessors. There is a branch of critical theory which goes into it - you might find this article interesting (hard going, but worth the effort, IMO). Harold Bloom started off a lot of useful thinking about one of the things that drives many artists. Emulation isn't imitation - on the contrary, mere imitation gives up on any ambition to emulate. Nor is emulation - or competition - necessarily a hostile act - on the contrary, it is the highest kind of tribute.
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #79 on: February 06, 2013, 10:47:17 PM »
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When I think about the history of the art forms I know something about, or the lives ans writings of artists I have studied in detail, I find it difficult to think of any who haven't competed, in some sense, with those they consider to be their real peers, whether contemporaries or predecessors. There is a branch of critical theory which goes into it - you might find this article interesting (hard going, but worth the effort, IMO). Harold Bloom started off a lot of useful thinking about one of the things that drives many artists. Emulation isn't imitation - on the contrary, mere imitation gives up on any ambition to emulate. Nor is emulation - or competition - necessarily a hostile act - on the contrary, it is the highest kind of tribute.
Thanks for the Bloom piece. It's too long to read tonight and do justice, but I wanted to make a quick and simple comment. It seems we disagree on what emulation means. I stand by the common meaning of emulation, which includes imitation in part (see my previous post). As to whether emulation or competition is hostile act, that's not a position I took this morning. I only suggested that it led one away from one's true self and results in a loss of authenticity. That's not about hostility.

And finally, the idea of tribute. Artists will pay tribute to past favorite influences in particular works. That's a fine gesture. But to live as a "tribute band" (let's say), is a strict limitation to individual art. I would not want to live my art life as a tribute to another artist. But that's a peculiarly individual choice I make about my art. I didn't want to suggest at all that such choices weren't permitted. In fact, I was rebelling against the opposite idea that such emulation and tribute was a requirement for me!

Artists get to make all these personal decisions about what path they are following in their art. I prefer to follow the path of staying authentic, and others may find fulfillment in emulation or tribute to others, even to the extent of being a "tribute artist" (common in music, maybe not as common in other arts).

As to the competition angle, I am not persuaded yet by your argument, but if Bloom has that persuasive argument, I'll let you know. I did preciously say, "some do compete," so I have acknowledged it is a choice made by some. 
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