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Author Topic: In my bag...  (Read 5665 times)
jeremypayne
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« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2013, 12:04:05 PM »
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Two kits:

 - RX100 in my pocket ... or ...

 - Tenba Medium Shootout Bag with ...
    - Nikon D700
    - Gitzo 2 Series, 4 section Carbon Fiber
    - Ballhead and Leveling plate
    - 50mm 1.4
    - 70-200mm 2.8 VRI
    - 16-35mm 2.8 ... I never use it.
    - 1.7x TC
    - Circular Polarizer
    - 3 Stop ND filter
    - Cable release
    - Canon 500D close-up adapter
    - Lots of little tools and cleaning supplies
    - WhiteBal Card ... haven't used it since 2009
    - Two spare batteries ... never need them ...
   
 
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KLaban
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« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2013, 01:03:07 PM »
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Keith, you forgot the tweezers!

Thanks, Rob, I always do.

Forgot to mention two must haves; cloth for depositing dust on my lenses and blower for depositing rubber on same.
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Rob C
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« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2013, 02:05:57 PM »
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Thanks, Rob, I always do.

Forgot to mention two must haves; cloth for depositing dust on my lenses and blower for depositing rubber on same.



Don't mention it, Keith; always my pleasure to serve!

One item that I seldom if ever forgot in the glory days was a hot, moist breath: it was wonderful for applying to filters! You could then rub a variety of either circular or straight lines all over them, using either expensive, specialist lens-cleaning tissues or, perhaps, a corner of your T-shirt, safe in the knowledge that you were doing your best. There was a trick attached, though: you had to remember anew,  each and every time, which was recommended by the makers: circular or straight-across wipes. Puts me in mind of polarizers.

Isn't photography wonderful?

Rob C


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Hulyss
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« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2013, 02:16:16 PM »
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A camera.
Couple of lenses.
A circular piece of equipment. Don’t ask, I don’t know.
Map. Never the one I need.
Notebook. Unused as I never remember the pencil.
Lubricant. No! It’s for the tripod.
Mobile. Turned off.
Cheese. At least I think it is.
Insect bite stick. Empty.
Identity label. Just in case I forget.
Plastic bags. A man can never have too many.
Typed instruction sheet on how to turn on and use mobile.
Lots of tissues. Used and unused.
…and ants. Always friggin ants.


All the same but no ants. In my case this is bees !! Probably because I always carry Beer.
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2013, 02:29:02 PM »
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Don't mention it, Keith; always my pleasure to serve!

One item that I seldom if ever forgot in the glory days was a hot, moist breath: it was wonderful for applying to filters! You could then rub a variety of either circular or straight lines all over them, using either expensive, specialist lens-cleaning tissues or, perhaps, a corner of your T-shirt, safe in the knowledge that you were doing your best. There was a trick attached, though: you had to remember anew,  each and every time, which was recommended by the makers: circular or straight-across wipes. Puts me in mind of polarizers.

Isn't photography wonderful?

Rob C



...nose grease? Wonders to soften the scratch after dragging the lens paper around withe the sand grain left in place by fearing the blower  Smiley  (Worked on the negative from time to time as well...)
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 02:32:42 PM by Patricia Sheley » Logged

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Rob C
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« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2013, 02:48:23 PM »
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...nose grease? Wonders to soften the scratch after dragging the lens paper around withe the sand grain left in place by fearing the blower  Smiley  (Worked on the negative from time to time as well...)



Patricia, that you would know that, means you have instantly earned your stripes!

The way I used to do it without fear of adding scratches whilst removing drying marks (despite Fotofo or whatever) was to apply it with the pad of the top section of my middle finger, right hand. For some reason, possibly because I'm told that I led a sheltered life, that little pad was as silky and smooth as one could hope! Oh, those wonderful days of many certainties!

;-)

Rob C

P.S.  Liked your shot of feet and wheel!
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2013, 03:14:55 PM »
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 Smiley
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2013, 03:25:36 PM »
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... was to apply it with the pad of the top section of my middle finger, right hand. For some reason, possibly because I'm told that I led a sheltered life, that little pad was as silky and smooth as one could hope!

;-)

Rob C
The very portion I lost in an accident years ago, which provided two gifts ; becoming somewhat ambidextrous, and having a rather unique way of being able to make the statement, "read between the lines". Sucks the words right out of the source. Wink
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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2013, 03:50:38 PM »
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In my bag - whichever lens isn't on the camera. Camera & lens that isn't in the bag, around my neck. Tripod strapped to the outside of my daysack.

D700, plus Nikkor 18-35mm & Nikkor 24-85mm. And yes, I know, not the best, most expensive lenses in the Nikon stable, but the 18-35 is remarkably good at the 35mm end, and at 18 far out-performs the 20mm prime that I had. The 24-85 is also pretty good at 85 (not as good as my 85 f1.8 prime), but the 24mm end has way too much vignetting, so essentially a 28-85mm.

In the dedicated camera bag resides a 50mm 1.8, a 28 f3.5 AIS, a 60mm macro, the 85 f1.8, 105 f2 AIS, and a 300 f4, plus flash (hardly ever used), and various bit & pieces.

Tripod is a light Giottos MT9340B, and is about to acquire an Arca Swiss P0 ball head & L bracket to replace the Giottos ball head.
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bill t.
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« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2013, 04:12:47 PM »
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I carry a 5D2, and 28, 35, 55, 85 and 105 AI and AIS Nikkors from the late Cretaceous period all equipped with shaky adapter flanges.  Also a pano head I built for $5 mounted on a Gitzo head I bought for $20 on ebay.  Don't remember where the tripod came from or what it is, but it's got some shipping foam rolled up on one of the legs for a shoulder pad.  Other than that, a few large trash bags and a couple rubber bands for when it rains.  Also bug spray and a roll of masking tape.  And a mosquito net shirt with hood that doesn't really work.  And some gardening clippers to remove nearby, non-indigenous weeds.  Coupla band aids and 4 Ibuprofen.
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NancyP
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« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2013, 07:40:51 PM »
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Excluding the camera and lens/lenses appropriate for the venue to be visited, here's the basic kit:
Microfiber cloths, large and small
Puffer
Extra batteries and cards
notebook and pencil
manual
Circular polarizing filter and if necessary a step-down ring (72-67)
hoods, naturally
wired remote shutter release
(L bracket lives on the camera)
Allen wrenches for the tripod and bracket/plates
Hot shoe spirit level, "double bubble" type
plastic bag - clean surface for changing lenses

Depending on situation:
Tripod vs monopod
Headlamp with red light option, if doing a twilight shoot
tripod ring/lens foot, if needed
Map, if off-road (I also photograph any maps at trail heads before heading out)

Not necessarily in the camera bag:
Carry water in car and on any hikes.
"10 essentials" somewhere on my person or in pack, if on a longer day hike.
extra pair of socks on hikes of any length
snack or lunch

phone with The Photographer's Ephemeris app








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Rob C
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« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2013, 02:12:33 AM »
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Unless my attention span has wavered, I have to admit to disappointment: nobody carries a Colt 45? Not even a Smith & Wesson? Not even a single, little pearl-handled device?

What do you do when you meet a mouse? Or a randy moose?

;-(

Rob C
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2013, 03:28:57 AM »
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Hi,

It is supposed to be ivory not pearl. Elephants are protected, so for me ivory is out, but so are handguns.

Best regards
Erik

Unless my attention span has wavered, I have to admit to disappointment: nobody carries a Colt 45? Not even a Smith & Wesson? Not even a single, little pearl-handled device?

What do you do when you meet a mouse? Or a randy moose?

;-(

Rob C
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bill t.
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« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2013, 03:32:38 AM »
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The three bottom sections of my tripod legs are in fact rocket powered grenades.  The mouse is actually a little more worrisome than the moose, as the ones around here sometimes carry bubonic plague and even Hantavirus, the latter of which makes the Black Death look relatively mild.  So far have had no problems with bears, coyotes, or mountain lions, all of which stubbornly refuse to pose.
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Rob C
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« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2013, 08:20:55 AM »
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The three bottom sections of my tripod legs are in fact rocket powered grenades.  The mouse is actually a little more worrisome than the moose, as the ones around here sometimes carry bubonic plague and even Hantavirus, the latter of which makes the Black Death look relatively mild.  So far have had no problems with bears, coyotes, or mountain lions, all of which stubbornly refuse to pose.



Hence rhe phrase ornery critters, much loved of US writers.

Have you tried to reason with them, the critters not the writers, or explained that within your tripod you hold the casting vote?

Rob C
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Riaan van Wyk
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« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2013, 10:08:13 AM »
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Often used to find a toad in one of the bags while I was still shooting rivers regularly. They must have had a sixth sense telling them that here in the cupboard, is an easy ride to the pool. Never brought them back though. One even hitched a ride to hospital, I had packed shoes for the stay and lo and behold while unpacking in the ward out jumps the man himself..Now that I live by the sea it is usually sand, everywhere and in everything. I hate sand.

 
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Rob C
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« Reply #36 on: February 05, 2013, 01:05:47 PM »
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Often used to find a toad in one of the bags while I was still shooting rivers regularly. They must have had a sixth sense telling them that here in the cupboard, is an easy ride to the pool. Never brought them back though. One even hitched a ride to hospital, I had packed shoes for the stay and lo and behold while unpacking in the ward out jumps the man himself..Now that I live by the sea it is usually sand, everywhere and in everything. I hate sand.


That's why, even though I l¡ve in a coastal resort, I never go to the beach anymore.

Sand gets into your shoes, onto your skin, sticks on sweat, always deposits itself in the car where you can't get at it, and makes a mess at home, too. The closest I get is into the rare seaside restaurant I visit maybe once a year, or onto the boat piers where there ain't no sand, just freezing winter winds!

It was even worse when we still had our dog: she loved swimmming and always brought half the beach into the back of the car when it was time to go home. Don't like it at all, can't even use it to make concrete, but two plastic bags filled with it stop the drying rack from blowing over and giving me the opportunity for a rewash...

Rob C
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NancyP
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« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2013, 01:11:07 PM »
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In spring through fall: 1. DEET or similar bug repellent stick 2. large mesh head cover that I drape over my wide-brimmed sun hat. I HATE mosquitos buzzing in my ear canal.
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francois
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« Reply #38 on: February 06, 2013, 03:33:00 AM »
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…I hate sand.

…I HATE mosquitos buzzing in my ear canal.

Last time I shot on a beach I got sand everywhere and also got bitten by tiger mosquitoes… It was a long time ago. I never returned there!
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Francois
Rob C
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« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2013, 11:07:50 AM »
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Last time I shot on a beach I got sand everywhere and also got bitten by tiger mosquitoes… It was a long time ago. I never returned there!




Francois,

We moored in Almerimar some years ago; it was then a partly developed site with some very nice but unsold properties surrounding the berths.

At one stage during dinner, the crew had to close all the ports and doors and spray the entire saloon with fly-killer: the mosquitoes were enormous! I don't think anyone was bitten, but their number and size were threat enough. Perhaps it was the swampy area near the marina, perhaps just the time of year.

Looked safe enough on film.

Rob C


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