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Author Topic: Which software to use for printing with Canon Pixma Pro 9500 mark ii?  (Read 1341 times)
The View
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« on: February 10, 2013, 08:08:32 PM »
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I need to print some of my images for a gallery exhibition - just setting up my new Canon Pixma Pro 9500 mark ii.

I can't use the set-up CD, because it's not for Mountain Lion.

So I went to Canon's website, and found several pieces of software for printing. There seem to be several for the same purpose.

1. Easy Photo Print Pro

2. Print Studio Pro

3. Easy Photo Print EX

Which one should I use? I'm just starting out with printing. For now I downloaded the first two.

Thanks!

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David Hufford
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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2013, 02:50:33 AM »
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I have only used the Easy Print software in the past. In my opinion, they are only good for quick prints where color accuracy is not especially important. Have never used the Print Studio Pro, so can't offer an opinion.
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nemophoto
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2013, 09:36:32 AM »
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I've played with them all. They're all OK, though my preference is printing via Photoshop or Lightroom. Of those programs, Only Easy Photo Print EX is a direct app. The others are plugins for Photoshop and Canon's DPP. Photo Print EX has some nice feature, among them printing CD/DVD labels, create calendars, create photo albums. I had a 9500 II for a couple of years and I found it a little frustrating to work with (I own an iPF6100 and iPF 8300 and now a PRO-1 for my "small" printer). My suggestion is go primarily with Canon papers. Print one print every day, otherwise, the printer wastes tons of inks cleaning heads. The quality of the printer is very good, but for my purposes a bit limiting. You should get some fabulous prints from it.

Nemo
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 10:38:41 AM »
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Here's one vote for Lightroom! It uses a modern day parametric approach and has a fully functional 1 month demo.
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The View
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« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 11:43:04 AM »
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So, basically I don't need any of those pieces of Canon software except the plugin for Photoshop CS6 (which I already have installed)?

My guess for printing was to convert the file to be printed to sRGB and print from Photoshop. (but I was confused by all this software from Canon - which (after your replies) seem to be gimmicks rather than real software and I wonder why this comes with a professional quality printer...

What exactly does the plug-in for Photoshop do?

And who should color manage? The printer - or Photoshop?

Thanks!
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hugowolf
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« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 12:56:33 PM »
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Another vote for Lightroom; so much better to print from than Photoshop.

So, basically I don't need any of those pieces of Canon software except the plugin for Photoshop CS6 (which I already have installed)?
You don't even need the plugin unless you want to use it.

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My guess for printing was to convert the file to be printed to sRGB and print from Photoshop. ...
Why would you convert to sRGB for printing? For posting on the web, yes sRGB, but for printing? Using your working space in Photoshop, you can softproof to see if any colors are out of gamut.

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And who should color manage? The printer - or Photoshop?
If you are using Canon inks and paper, then letting the printer manage color is a good place to start. Once you get the hang of that, then having your software manage color gives you more control. And, if you are using third party papers, then you really need to have the software manage color using ICC profiles for the paper.

Brian A
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The View
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2013, 01:02:43 PM »
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Another vote for Lightroom; so much better to print from than Photoshop.
You don't even need the plugin unless you want to use it.
Why would you convert to sRGB for printing? For posting on the web, yes sRGB, but for printing? Using your working space in Photoshop, you can softproof to see if any colors are out of gamut.
If you are using Canon inks and paper, then letting the printer manage color is a good place to start. Once you get the hang of that, then having your software manage color gives you more control. And, if you are using third party papers, then you really need to have the software manage color using ICC profiles for the paper.

Brian A

Thanks, Brian!

I don't have Lightroom - I use Capture One Pro 7 (should I import TIFFs into the catalogue and print from Capture One Pro 7 instead of Photoshop?)

In regards to sRGB, I was under the impression that the printer couldn't go beyond that color space. I will definitely read up on soft proofing to catch out of gamut colors.

I use Canon inks and have some Canon papers, but I also bought Hahnemuhle papers, so I'll have to find out on how to get a good printing result printing by having Photoshop control the process.

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hugowolf
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2013, 02:23:35 PM »
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I don't have Lightroom - I use Capture One Pro 7 (should I import TIFFs into the catalogue and print from Capture One Pro 7 instead of Photoshop?)
I don't have Capture One, so I can't compare. There must be some comparisons on the Web.

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In regards to sRGB, I was under the impression that the printer couldn't go beyond that color space. I will definitely read up on soft proofing to catch out of gamut colors.
The printer can't print all of sRGB, but then neither does sRGB encompass all of the printers gamut.

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I use Canon inks and have some Canon papers, but I also bought Hahnemuhle papers, so I'll have to find out on how to get a good printing result printing by having Photoshop control the process.
You can download the Hahnemühle profiles for you printer and their papers from their site. You can also have custom profiles made for you, or, with the right equipement, make your own printer/paper profiles.

Brian A
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Sal Baker
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2013, 02:39:12 PM »
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Another vote for Lightroom; so much better to print from than Photoshop.

Brian, are you talking about ease of use or final print quality?  I have no problems using PS for one-off art prints, but if LR offers improved IQ I would think about buying it.

Sal
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The View
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« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2013, 02:40:52 PM »
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I don't have Capture One, so I can't compare. There must be some comparisons on the Web.
The printer can't print all of sRGB, but then neither does sRGB encompass all of the printers gamut.
You can download the Hahnemühle profiles for you printer and their papers from their site. You can also have custom profiles made for you, or, with the right equipement, make your own printer/paper profiles.

Brian A

Is there a particular process on how to install the paper profiles?

I just downloaded additional paper profiles from Canon's website, but when you open the package, you see them in a folder without any action that I could take. You can't drag them anywhere...
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hugowolf
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« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2013, 03:05:31 PM »
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Is there a particular process on how to install the paper profiles?

I just downloaded additional paper profiles from Canon's website, but when you open the package, you see them in a folder without any action that I could take. You can't drag them anywhere...
It is operating system dependent. Under Windows, once you have the profiles somewhere (and unzipped, if they were zipped), you just right click and choose 'intall'. On a Mac OS, you need to drag them to a specific ColorSync folder and it also depends whether you are on a single user machine or want them available to all users - Google 'install profiles Mac'.

Also, I'm sure the Canojn website will have specific directions for unpacking them.

Brian A
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hugowolf
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« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2013, 03:26:57 PM »
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Brian, are you talking about ease of use or final print quality?  I have no problems using PS for one-off art prints, but if LR offers improved IQ I would think about buying it.
Sal, it has been discussed frequently on these forums. Layout is improved, ease of use is improved, and upressing and output sharpening are improved: Here is a recent thread, but there are many more:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=74913.msg597338#msg597338

Brian A
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