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Author Topic: One scene, three different color temperatures  (Read 854 times)
Damon Lynch
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« on: February 11, 2013, 05:01:13 PM »
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As you can see in the photo, in addition to natural light, plenty of the scene is lit by incandescent and fluorescent lighting. I don't know if I really need to adjust it, or it is fine as if. But assuming I should at least try to see what it looks like when the green and yellow portions of the image have been neutralized, what is the quickest way of doing so? Is it a job that lends itself to Photoshop and masks (or something else that can work with masks)? Or is there a better way?
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bill t.
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« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2013, 05:18:08 PM »
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It's an old standby...warm cozy refuges contrasted against cold, hard edged places.  You've got a pretty good aesthetic balance already.  Just for fun, don't try to correct it but take it even further.  A lot of color theory books throw a lot of words at this kind of situation.  But all you need to know is, unusual color sells, and so does cozy when the weather outside is frightful, but inside it's so delightful.  Good photo, it made me look!
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2013, 05:18:34 PM »
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Temperature and Tint adjustment brush in Lightroom. A several seconds job.
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Slobodan

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Damon Lynch
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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 05:21:11 PM »
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Thanks Bill and Slobodan! I didn't even know about that brush.
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bretedge
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2013, 10:11:17 PM »
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It's already been said but the adjustment brush in Lightroom 4 would make short work of this.  Alternatively, Nik Software Viveza 2 would also allow for very easy local editing of those areas using Control Points.  Two ways to accomplish the same thing with very similar results.

Crazy thing is, not that long ago this would have been a much more complicated procedure in Photoshop.  Gotta love technology.
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