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Author Topic: HP LP2475W and this particular colour range I simply CANNOT see (easily.)  (Read 1206 times)
zxyz
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« on: February 12, 2013, 11:35:32 PM »
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I got this monitor in 2010, and as far back as I can remember, there has been a particular range of green I can barely see. All this time I've just ignored it but now I REALLY would like to know WHY. I've even uploaded and example:

http://ompldr.org/vaGczbw/Untitled-1.png

My calibrated settings are:

Native white point.
Contrast: 100
Brightness: 37.
Since I selected Native white point in my calibration software, It was never needed to adjust RGB, but they are at 255 across the board.

In any event, I have never ever been able to make out that shade of green, even at factory values. Is it because of the type of monitor this is (wide gamut)? Given the amount of money this was it really surprises me that I can see it on my families cheapo TFT samsung monitors but not on mine. Has mine been a factory defect all along?

Any answers are appreciated.
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Rocco Penny
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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2013, 08:34:31 AM »
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coupla things,
impossible to say about your particular screen colors compared to mine or any other due to your color management whichever is used even identical hard and software.
That said,
I have had 3 2475w.
There have been problems on 2 and the third is pretty durn good.
I was having trouble matching any realistic terms from shooting to print.
Over and over I adjusted to get things even just meh.
Then finally I returned the monitor because of another problem, (funny mist hard to explain unless you see it. Half the screen had cast differences all the time, second screen had a funny caterpillar looking blob down the side of the bezel- hard to miss unless you're blind.
So, 2 monitors and I couldn't get even close to the real colors of say a skunks nose,
THEN, after the caterpillar blob incident,
the third monitor is just so nice-
no kidding the 5% better equaled a world of opportunity for sharpening etc.
Now remember I bought the 1rst from B&H full price, then HP satisfied their warranty twice (I understand there may have been a change in warranty for new sold 2475w as too many were coming back
The third screen right away on the fur of a bobcat there was a certain depth and fine coloring I never could achieve on my first two monitors.
Now I only occasionally profile it and wonder if
this is just luck.
I wouldn't rule out those settings being off.
Mine are very different.
Practically factory settings.
Let me guess;
you cant get your luminosity in range unless you turn down the brightness?
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hugowolf
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2013, 08:54:54 AM »
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What hardware and software are you using to calibrate this monitor?

Brian A
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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2013, 09:09:53 AM »
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The big differences in a wide gamut display is in the green's (that's where Adobe RGB is much larger than sRGB). But without seeing a profile of the current display, mapped in 3D gamut next to the color you hope to view, it's impossible to say for certain.
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
zxyz
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« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2013, 02:23:47 AM »
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I wouldn't rule out those settings being off.
Mine are very different.
Practically factory settings.
Let me guess;
you cant get your luminosity in range unless you turn down the brightness?

Yes. Please let me clarify my situation a little bit. I'm not a photographer. I got this monitor because I like to get the best I can at good prices, and everwhere I read said IPS is the way to go. At the price this was, to me it was a steal. I was, however, told that to get the best out of it I needed to properly calibrate it. I do some have some background in graphic design though.  Calibrating is something I'm having a really hard time with. I use an X-rite Eye-One Display 2. Here are the supposed proper settings for the targets 6500k white point, 120cd/m2 and 2.2 Gamma:

Brightness: 60
Contrast: 100
R:174
G:183
B: 225

These settings look really dull and odd to me. it's like a blueish tint. I used the Ambient light Head to check my room temperature and it says it's 2800k (way off from where the software says it should be) and illuminance value of 54 Lux. I'm wondering if this is the issue. Oooor maybe I know nothing, and that's how a properly calibrated monitor looks. I'm just too used to inaccurate colours/blacks/greys. I mean calibration is really about accuracy for prints, soo...

ANYWAYS I'm rambling now. I definitely should have checked into this earlier, as I doubt I'm still under warranty. The fact is, if I can't see that range of green at factory settings this thing is probably faulty. Any other insight and wisdom is greatly appreciated though. Here's hoping I am still under warranty (do they even still MAKE these things?  Cheesy), or I'll have to fork out money I don't have (eventually).  Cry
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Fernando García
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« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2013, 10:09:34 AM »
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Although a long time reader of the website, this is my first post here, so ...well, to the topic.

I have that monitor and use the Colormunki to profile it (D65, 80 cd/m2 based on my ambient light, or lack thereof). I've no complains with the monitor but the most saturated greens in AdobeRGB are beyond its range.
I've downloaded your image and have no problem seeing the greens in the word "Drelmo".
Soft-proofing in LR4 shows that the green colors are within my monitor's profile gamut. It also shows that part of the greens get clipped in sRGB (not in AdobeRGB).
I would do as the digitaldog advises. You can download a demo of Gamutvision which is I see it's fully functional for a limited number of profiles.

Hope this helps.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2013, 10:14:53 AM »
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Here are the supposed proper settings for the targets 6500k white point, 120cd/m2 and 2.2 Gamma:

Supposed is the correct term here. While this has no affect on the gamut and your green issue, the settings you use should be those that produce a visual match to a print (assuming that's what you want to match from the display). As such, YMMV. See: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/why_are_my_prints_too_dark.shtml

Mapping in 3D that PNG you provided shows it falls within sRGB in greens, there are a few saturated blues that just fall outside sRGB gamut. But without your display profile, I can't see what would or would not fall outside it's gamut!
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Rocco Penny
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« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2013, 08:23:41 PM »
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You may need a wide gamut capable profiling solution

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