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Author Topic: Intercourse PA  (Read 584 times)
cjogo
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« on: February 14, 2013, 09:54:55 PM »
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Trying to stay my distance -- respect the Amish rules ..200mm lens from a cross the fields .. early 100 film
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cjogo
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2013, 12:37:31 PM »
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I really liked the boy on top the bails >  with a straw in his mouth  Wink
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amolitor
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2013, 12:41:34 PM »
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I quite like it, the geometry and the personalities are nice.

I don't like the noise, and I feel like the horse team is mis-placed. Not that you're in a position to go moving it around, of course, but I think this would have been stronger a minute or two earlier, always assuming the boys where equally fortuitously placed. It definitely has that Long Lens feel to it, which gives it a slightly uncomfortable look, like surveillance footage. I don't really know if that uncomfortableness adds, detracts, or is neutral.
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2013, 12:45:01 PM »
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Trying to stay my distance -- respect the Amish rules ..200mm lens from a cross the fields .. early 100 film
Putting aside everything involving the color, grain, and all those technical aspect of the photograph - which I don't quite get here  - I think the subject and the framing is very interesting. It's quite peaceful in a Norman Rockwell sort of way, and has a nostalgic feel. There's a lot to look at and get interested in here. However when I zoom in the detail fizzles. So, I won't talk about that aspect of it.

Farm photographs like this can be very romantic and if there is a danger it is that it turns too sentimental. I don't think that's the case here, but it is close. It has an almost too perfect set of characters. Anyway, I find it enjoyable to look at, even with the rendering problems.

If this rendering was on purpose - as a technique - I don't think it supports the subject very well.
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cjogo
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2013, 01:11:28 PM »
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I'm sure poorly processed film back in the early 80's  > doesn't  help the noise problem .  I worked several hours on this one , just trying to remove specs/dust. The color aberrations ,etc were really difficult to try and diminish. Have you ever tried scanning 100 color film --yikes.  Shocked
 I was pretty far away ( since you can't approach /photograph this group of Amish)  zoomed out max.    Had a chance for just one shot --before I was detected .
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2013, 01:23:59 PM »
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I'm sure poorly processed film back in the early 80's  > doesn't  help the noise problem .  I worked several hours on this one , just trying to remove specs/dust. The color aberrations ,etc were really difficult to try and diminish. Have you ever tried scanning 100 color film --yikes.  Shocked
 I was pretty far away ( since you can't approach /photograph this group of Amish)  zoomed out max.    Had a chance for just one shot --before I was detected .
I understand the issues in the difficulty of scanning. No problem. I just didn't want to make that the center of my opinion. I've never had too much luck with scanning either. It is tedious, to be sure.
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dmerger
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2013, 02:37:02 PM »
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Itís interesting that they appear to be using a gasoline powered hay baler, but just horse power to cut the hay.
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Dean Erger
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« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2013, 02:45:40 PM »
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They're out of the picture Dean but I'm sure that the baler is pulled by horses too.

Later,
Johnny
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Johnny Johnson
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cjogo
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« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2013, 02:58:38 PM »
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I understand the issues in the difficulty of scanning. No problem. I just didn't want to make that the center of my opinion. I've never had too much luck with scanning either. It is tedious, to be sure.

Digital is such a different world --  Grin  Besides being able to shoot 100 images for every 1 image you take with a 12 exposure camera ..a 20+meg chip just looks good ..& no noise /grain if properly exposed.
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RedwoodGuy
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« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2013, 03:04:31 PM »
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Digital is such a different world --  Grin  Besides being able to shoot 100 images for every 1 image you take with a 12 exposure camera ..a 20+meg chip just looks good ..& no noise /grain if properly exposed.
Yes, I know. Until last summer I was using 120 film cameras--->develop my film--->scan--->print. Although it was very enjoyable for many years, I wanted to downsize into a more compact operation. I don't miss taking specs off the scanned images and all that. Scanning was so time consuming in all respects. Good luck with your work!
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cjogo
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« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2013, 03:14:31 PM »
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I rarely shoot anymore -- stopped back about 10 years ago.  I have way too much to scan from 30+ years of travels ==sheets of 120 /4X5/35 negatives    ~~ Color and B&W   waiting to be scanned.    Just waiting for the PLUSTEK to get on the market --our Minolta Pro died  back a year ago.  Sad

I have new EOS system and good glass --but thats for business  Cool
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dmerger
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« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2013, 03:19:10 PM »
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They're out of the picture Dean but I'm sure that the baler is pulled by horses too.

Later,
Johnny

It may be pulled by horses, but what's that contraption at the top right of the baler?  Sure looks like a gasoline engine to me.
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Dean Erger
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« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2013, 03:36:54 PM »
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It may be pulled by horses, but what's that contraption at the top right of the baler?  Sure looks like a gasoline engine to me.

Yes, that's typical. The baler or combine, etc.will be powered by an engine but propelled by horses. Those same dairy farmers won't have electricity run to their houses or but will have a diesel generator in the milking barn to keep the milk cool until it is picked up for processing.

Later,
Johnny
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Johnny Johnson
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dmerger
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« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2013, 06:54:14 PM »
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I grew up in an area with a lot of Amish.  Sure they were a little different, but nobody made a big deal out of it.  I donít mean any disrespect, but the photo made me wonder why, for them, itís okay to use a gasoline engine for some purposes but not others.  I donít know the answer, but found it interesting. Thatís all.
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Dean Erger
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