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Author Topic: Film for Interiors  (Read 5132 times)
Scott Hargis
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« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2013, 05:59:27 PM »
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Well, here's an example. One (the darker one) is shot with a 5dMii and a 24TS -- it's a flat stitch. I'd estimate that it's about 70% ambient, 30% strobe. If memory serves, the strobes were gelled about 1/2 CTO. This is a workshop photo, so don't judge it too harshly; I've got way too much going on during workshops to make quality images!

The lighter one was shot on a Mamiya RB67 with a 50mm lens (note the barrel distortion: yikes!). Same lighting setup, and the film was Kodak E100. The color came back incredibly warm; I've imported this into Lightroom and messed around with the temp/tint sliders and also the camera calibration sliders in an attempt to find realistic color.

I'm also not sure these were made on the same day. I was in this place on three separate days, and built the same shot on all three days. I can't seem to find the date/time exif on the film shot, haha!

All I can say is -- I've got mad respect for anyone who can do this and keep the color consistent when shooting mixed lighting! I'll keep at it. I can see that this is going to make me much better at assessing color and correcting it in the field. I feel like my digital camera is much more forgiving, even without messing around with RAW adjustments. My digital "straight-out-of-camera" images don't show this level of color cast.

« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 06:04:51 PM by Scott Hargis » Logged

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Ed Foster, Jr.
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« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2013, 06:36:15 PM »
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Scott,

Well, there is a nice "feel" to film images. Seeing these brought back memories of the days of extensively using chromes and the PIA we would go though balancing emulsions only to have to repeat the process for every new order of different batch numbers. At least 4 x 5's provided a starting point for corrections. Of course all the correcting in the world doesn't help much at times with mixed lighting and casts.

I do think you are right though, it helps ones in-camera digital thinking.

Ed
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2013, 08:16:07 PM »
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Quote
My digital "straight-out-of-camera" images don't show this level of color cast.

One of the reasons I wouldn't think of going back to film for my commercial AP.
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Kirk Gittings
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DanielStone
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« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2013, 10:46:47 PM »
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.....

The lighter one was shot on a Mamiya RB67 with a 50mm lens (note the barrel distortion: yikes!). Same lighting setup, and the film was Kodak E100. The color came back incredibly warm; I've imported this into Lightroom and messed around with the temp/tint sliders and also the camera calibration sliders in an attempt to find realistic color.

......

Just out of curiosity, how has your "E100" been stored, and which "E100.." emulsion were/are you shooting? There were a few:

E100G, E100GX, E100VS, E100SW, etc...

E100GX and E100VS were more warmtoned, especially E100GX, which was like E100G, but with an 81A-81B filter built into the film...

Also, chrome has a tendency to go magenta/reddish(especially in lower tones, like shadows) if expired a few years past-date. Especially if non-refrigerated or frozen during storage.

So don't go blaming the film just yet, there may be some "culprits" in the mix, just so we're all understood Wink

-Dan
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Scott Hargis
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« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2013, 10:12:56 AM »
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Busted! It was expired film. Stored in the fridge, but several years past it's date. And, it was E100VS. So I guess that explains the magenta/warm issues.

Stay tuned. That was the last of the expired film, and I've made it a priority to get at least one film capture per shoot this year. Really appreciate the comments here.
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amsp
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« Reply #25 on: March 27, 2013, 11:52:30 AM »
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Busted! It was expired film. Stored in the fridge, but several years past it's date. And, it was E100VS. So I guess that explains the magenta/warm issues.

Stay tuned. That was the last of the expired film, and I've made it a priority to get at least one film capture per shoot this year. Really appreciate the comments here.

That would do it, yes  Grin Also, the E100 series was known for being somewhat warmer, and E100VS the most warm and saturated of the bunch. Try Provia next time maybe?
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DanielStone
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« Reply #26 on: March 27, 2013, 03:21:35 PM »
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I've found that E100G shot @ 80, and then PULLED 1/3 stop in processing gives a nice shoulder(highlights) vs 100asa ratings and "normal" developments. A little bit more information in the shadows(not much more, but just a bit), but the highlights(carefully metered mind you) are placed right where I want them on the exposure scale.

But since E100G isn't being made anymore Sad, Provia 100F @ box speed if you want a bit more "pop" color-wise, or rating it @ 80, and them processing -1/3(just like the E100G) helps "mute" the colors down a tad.

Fuji can also go a bit blue w/ underexposure FYI, so having a slight warming filter(say an 81A) can help balance things out pre-digital post/scanning. It just makes things easier in the end IMO Wink

Mr. Collins explains it pretty well in this video here(starting about 1:35 in):

http://youtu.be/ekRet4v2LR8

best of luck!

-Dan
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Scott Hargis
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« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2013, 04:14:19 PM »
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Cool. I'll have a go at the video later tonight.

Provia was on the short list, but based on earlier comments I bought a pack of Fuji Reala, which is in the camera right now. I'll have some results from that soon. (I really need to be less precious about film. Takes forever to finish a roll. Maybe I should bracket a little more.)

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rethmeier
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« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2013, 11:06:54 PM »
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In my early film days, I shot  Kodak 64T  and used filters for colour balance.The reason for the 64T was the long exposure times.
Later I only used Fuji Provia and the Fuji 64 T stock. Towards the end of my film use I switched to using Fuji Color Neg 160 asa .

I really like the way it scanned and it also gave me excellent exposure latitude.
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Jeffreytotaro
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« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2013, 07:42:27 AM »
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Just scanned this one quickly, but I didn't see a mention of Fuji NPS and NPL. Are they still available? Color Neg films that handled mixed lighting and especially fluorescent really well. Once these came out I virtually stopped shooting chrome on interiors unless it was all one light source. Sorry if this was already mentioned.....
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Jeffrey Totaro
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DanielStone
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« Reply #30 on: March 28, 2013, 05:56:08 PM »
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Just scanned this one quickly, but I didn't see a mention of Fuji NPS and NPL. Are they still available? Color Neg films that handled mixed lighting and especially fluorescent really well. Once these came out I virtually stopped shooting chrome on interiors unless it was all one light source. Sorry if this was already mentioned.....

NPL is long-gone
NPS is now gone Sad. Great film, but only available on the Japanese market it seems now (now called 160"NS")
http://www.japanexposures.com/shop/product_info.php?cPath=29&products_id=474

Here in the USA, Portra 160/400 is now the "standard" affair for color neg, Fuji for chrome(Kodak killed E-6 last year)

-Dan
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aviv1887
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« Reply #31 on: March 28, 2013, 10:14:28 PM »
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I used to shoot AD images on the Fuji 64T aswell because it was more forgiving in pushing and creating less color shifts/casts compared to Kodak.  I'm with Jeffrey that when I switched to NPS colorneg it would push certain problems with nasty color shifts out of the spectrum.  I just was asked to shoot something on 4x5 again not to long ago and couldn't believe all the flims and polaroids had completely disappeared.
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Scott Hargis
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« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2013, 01:12:31 PM »
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A few results coming back....here's a side-by-side comparison. Film version is the 8x10 (with switchplates on the walls), shot with Fuji Reala on a Mamiya RB67 with a 50mm lens. I've corrected some barrel distortion, and rotated the image slightly to make up for my crappy field technique and cheap lens. And, I cooled down the white balance about 6 points in Lightroom. Otherwise, this is a straight-out-of-the-scanner image.

The digital version has the wider aspect ratio, and no switchplates (I cloned 'em out in Photoshop). It's 5dMii with a 24TS + 1.4 extender. This one has seen some LR adjustments and of course I took out the switchplates and any other blemishes I could find, for delivery to client.

We were flagging off the windows around the corner to the right but I see that I neglected to tell my PA to re-do that when I shot the film version, hence the extra glare on the right-end cabinetry. Under-cabinet fluorescents were gelled minus green, and there's light being added in the farthest recessed spaces, as well as some for the floor and foreground where the stools are.

So, Fuji Reala works pretty good! It was slightly too warm, but not bad. I recently acquired a Sinar F1, and I've been shooting 4x5 Fuji Provia all week, so in another week or 10 days I'll (hopefully) have some of those to put up. Assuming any of them come out, haha!
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 01:18:52 PM by Scott Hargis » Logged

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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2013, 01:35:11 PM »
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Looking at these makes me think of one really big obstacle, there are so many different types of light sources we use today in our buildings.  I would assume 10+ years ago, there was just incandescent or mercury vapor, so we only had those to worry about.  Now there are those plus a few more; I think for this reason film is just not an option anymore.  It just would take too long to gel every light to the same color. 
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Joe Kitchen
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Jeffreytotaro
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« Reply #34 on: April 10, 2013, 01:37:33 PM »
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Nice shots Scott!
Have to say I prefer the digital version. The Reala records the wood on the island too green. I actually like the light on the cabinets in the film shot though. Thanks for the comparison!
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Jeffrey Totaro
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Scott Hargis
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« Reply #35 on: April 10, 2013, 01:43:05 PM »
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Looking at these makes me think of one really big obstacle, there are so many different types of light sources we use today in our buildings.  I would assume 10+ years ago, there was just incandescent or mercury vapor, so we only had those to worry about.  Now there are those plus a few more; I think for this reason film is just not an option anymore.  It just would take too long to gel every light to the same color. 

Joe, we spend time on pretty  much every shoot gelling lights, or replacing the bulbs. But it's worth it to get good color! And not having to light a kitchen to match the exposure on a 100-watt pendant light is pretty nice, too...

Nice shots Scott!
Have to say I prefer the digital version. The Reala records the wood on the island too green. I actually like the light on the cabinets in the film shot though. Thanks for the comparison!


Thanks, Jeff, and I agree about the green in the shadows. Probably coming from camera right, where there are windows and foliage.
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Scott Hargis
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« Reply #36 on: April 10, 2013, 03:43:00 PM »
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Two more side-by-sides. Didn't do as well on these. Still with the Mamiya + Fuji Reala, vs. the 5dMii w/ LR adjustments.
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amsp
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« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2013, 04:07:55 PM »
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I personally think the film shots look much more "alive" and inviting.
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fredjeang2
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« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2013, 05:01:43 PM »
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pffff....side by side the difference is abysmal ! (in favor to film)

The same as going into a Haute-Couture salon vs Les gallerie Lafayette.

A Little bit of Paris couture lingerie, the real one, like film:  http://www.chantalthomass.fr/#/accueil

« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 05:05:55 PM by fredjeang2 » Logged
FredBGG
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« Reply #39 on: April 10, 2013, 07:07:06 PM »
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I personally think the film shots look much more "alive" and inviting.

Film somehow has a more credible look, it's probably in part because we looked at film images for years and years.....
before digital came along.

Anyway goole images :

gregory crewdson

he shoots interiors with 8x10 film...
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