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Author Topic: Film for Interiors  (Read 5319 times)
Scott Hargis
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« Reply #40 on: April 10, 2013, 11:05:05 PM »
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haha! Not sure if this is a compliment to my film skills, or a knock on my digital images....I shall choose to be complimented...

I actually prefer the film version of the one with the lit fireplace. The others....maybe my sensibility is skewed towards digital since that's what I'm used to.
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fredjeang2
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« Reply #41 on: April 11, 2013, 03:40:31 AM »
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Film somehow has a more credible look, it's probably in part because we looked at film images for years and years.....
before digital came along.

Anyway goole images :

gregory crewdson

he shoots interiors with 8x10 film...
Crewdson is great.
I've been following his work for years.

 He is in the high-end art gallery market.
In this niche market, the process
And film has a big value. More the
Imagery has a craft component in
All the chain, the better. The exception
Being digital instalations. The size
Of the image is very important too.
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Rob C
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« Reply #42 on: April 11, 2013, 08:54:00 AM »
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Thanks for the link, Fred. I don't really like Ms Unwerth, never did - but I do like the girls she sometimes uses. She reminds me of a weaker, female version of Helmut. A lot of her b/white work used to feature years ago in French PHOTO which I used to buy...

I sometimes listen to digital radio, Gold, from London, and they are running advertisements from the UK Foreign Office warning people driving in Spain with UK number plates or in rental cars to be careful because thieves are stopping such cars by telling the drivers that they have a problem with the car. When they stop, they mug them. It used to be flavour of the month around the Ferry Terminal in Barcelona years and years ago: boys on bikes would puncture tyres at the lights - multi-laned roundabout there - and somebody has obviously learned the lessons and expanded the operational base. Happened to people I know. Coños.

Rob C
« Last Edit: April 12, 2013, 03:51:22 AM by Rob C » Logged

Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #43 on: April 11, 2013, 09:48:58 AM »
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haha! Not sure if this is a compliment to my film skills, or a knock on my digital images....I shall choose to be complimented...

I actually prefer the film version of the one with the lit fireplace. The others....maybe my sensibility is skewed towards digital since that's what I'm used to.

Of course you could give any of those digital versions the "look" of film in post. I got good at this as I oftentimes was hired to reshoot some of my earlier projects, first shot in film, now only working commercially in digital. Wanting the complete set to have the same look anf feel I never found it that hard to tweak color and contrast to get the digital to look like earlier chromes (or color negs). Personally I find it a big advantage to have only shot film for 25 years and know what that looks and feels like when I am processing digital now-that is also true for my personal b&w work.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 10:18:29 AM by Kirk Gittings » Logged

Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
Architecture and Landscape Photography
WWW.GITTINGSPHOTO.COM

LIGHT+SPACE+STRUCTURE (blog)
Rob C
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« Reply #44 on: April 11, 2013, 12:55:08 PM »
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Of course you could give any of those digital versions the "look" of film in post. I got good at this as I oftentimes was hired to reshoot some of my earlier projects, first shot in film, now only working commercially in digital. Wanting the complete set to have the same look anf feel I never found it that hard to tweak color and contrast to get the digital to look like earlier chromes (or color negs). Personally I find it a big advantage to have only shot film for 25 years and know what that looks and feels like when I am processing digital now-that is also true for my personal b&w work.


Without that background I would have been lost today.

Rob C
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TMARK
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« Reply #45 on: April 11, 2013, 01:18:08 PM »
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Crewdon uses Phase backs now.

About Crewdson, man, I just hate his work.  Images are beautiful, but the thinking behind it is sophmoric, superficial Freudian analysis of hackneyed topics.  Yeah yeah, suburban American life feels like you are downing.  So here is his pic of a suburban American house filling with water, a housewife floating in it.  Deep.  heavy.  Calculated to sell.  Come on.  This world view was addressed in 65-70 years ago in novels and documentary photography. Its contrived and easily arived at.  The only thing he did that I liked was this series of small black and white fireflies.  It's honest work without the art world, or rather, art market, bull shit.  Its a shame that Mass MoCA adopted him as their star art photographer when better art makes the pages of W every month.

The kicker is that the intro to one of his books is written by Rick Moody, who is a bloodless boring author addressing upper middle class angst in the same manner as Mr. Crewdson.  
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 03:27:46 PM by TMARK » Logged
jsch
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« Reply #46 on: April 11, 2013, 02:51:49 PM »
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Crewdon uses Phase backs now.

About Crewdson, man, I just hate his work.  Images are beautiful, but the thinking behind it is sophmoric, superficial Freudian analysis of hackneyed topics.  Yeah yeah, suburban American life feels like you are downing.  So here is his pic of a suburban American house filling with water, a housewife floating in it.  Deep.  heavy.  Calculated to sell.  Come on.  This world view was addressed in Its contrived and easily arived at.  The only thing he did that I liked was this series of small black and white fireflies.  It's honest work without the art world, or rather, art market, bull shit.  Its a shame that Mass MoCA adopted him as their star art photographer when better art makes the pages of W every month.

The kicker is that the intro to one of his books is written by Rick Moody, who is a bloodless boring author addressing upper middle class angst in the same manner as Mr. Crewdson. 

Yes, yes and yes. You are so right.

Best,
Johannes
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fredjeang2
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« Reply #47 on: April 11, 2013, 03:26:05 PM »
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Crewdon uses Phase backs now.

About Crewdson, man, I just hate his work.  Images are beautiful, but the thinking behind it is sophmoric, superficial Freudian analysis of hackneyed topics.  Yeah yeah, suburban American life feels like you are downing.  So here is his pic of a suburban American house filling with water, a housewife floating in it.  Deep.  heavy.  Calculated to sell.  Come on.  This world view was addressed in Its contrived and easily arived at.  The only thing he did that I liked was this series of small black and white fireflies.  It's honest work without the art world, or rather, art market, bull shit.  Its a shame that Mass MoCA adopted him as their star art photographer when better art makes the pages of W every month.

The kicker is that the intro to one of his books is written by Rick Moody, who is a bloodless boring author addressing upper middle class angst in the same manner as Mr. Crewdson.  

Curious you hate his work.

I think he is the Hopper of photography. Well, yes, cliché certainly but very well processed at all stages and honest. I bite personaly.

Upper middle class angst, well yes; for who are the current art-gallery spheres to since decades? Some time ago I met Robert Longo at his representant in Madrid. And nuclear explosions etc etc...that's what I thought also: upper middle class angst. And there was this Little shy man (he is smaller tan me wich is difficult) on the corner with a big nuclear explosion.
The same who build the BS glass arquitecture of our big cities buy those.

They rule the world.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 03:29:21 PM by fredjeang2 » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2013, 03:36:23 PM »
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Curious you hate his work.

I think he is the Hopper of photography. Well, yes, cliché certainly but very well processed at all stages and honest. I bite personaly.

Upper middle class angst, well yes; for who are the current art-gallery spheres to since decades? Some time ago I met Robert Longo at his representant in Madrid. And nuclear explosions etc etc...that's what I thought also: upper middle class angst. And there was this Little shy man (he is smaller tan me wich is difficult) on the corner with a big nuclear explosion.
The same who build the BS glass arquitecture of our big cities buy those.

They rule the world.



I wish they'd buy my stuff, too.

;-(

Rob C
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TMARK
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« Reply #49 on: April 11, 2013, 03:37:38 PM »
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EDITED

Upper middle class angst, well yes; for who are the current art-gallery spheres to since decades? Some time ago I met Robert Longo at his representant in Madrid. And nuclear explosions etc etc...that's what I thought also: upper middle class angst.
The same who build the BS glass arquitecture of our big cities.

They rule the world.

Fred, you put your finger on it.
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TMARK
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« Reply #50 on: April 11, 2013, 03:40:56 PM »
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I wish they'd buy my stuff, too.

;-(

Rob C

I sold them several buildings in Brooklyn that I bought at tax sales in the late 90's. 
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fredjeang2
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« Reply #51 on: April 11, 2013, 03:43:05 PM »
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superficial Freudian analysis of hackneyed topics

I totaly agree on this. But it's like Descartes and his "I think so I am" and the desastrous consequences of this that we still have.

 
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MrSmith
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« Reply #52 on: April 11, 2013, 04:13:21 PM »
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Crewdon uses Phase backs now.



He probably doesn't pay for them either. I worked for a well known U.S based photo artist who used a phase back that was given to them for a project, there was a phase camera and lenses too (that never even got taken out of the box) Reminds me of a line in one of my favourite films:
"free to those who can afford it, very expensive to those that can't".

I'm surprised phase don't make more of the art use in their marketing, the guy in the lab coat and the insipid pics are starting to grate.
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amsp
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« Reply #53 on: April 11, 2013, 04:31:31 PM »
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He probably doesn't pay for them either. I worked for a well known U.S based photo artist who used a phase back that was given to them for a project, there was a phase camera and lenses too (that never even got taken out of the box) Reminds me of a line in one of my favourite films:
"free to those who can afford it, very expensive to those that can't".

I'm surprised phase don't make more of the art use in their marketing, the guy in the lab coat and the insipid pics are starting to grate.

Here's some nice use of sponsored Phase equipment that as far as I know they haven't used in any marketing either.

https://vimeo.com/63175278

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FredBGG
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« Reply #54 on: April 11, 2013, 06:13:20 PM »
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I find Crewdsons's work very interesting.
While I love documentary photographic art I like his completely constructed work.

In a sense he is a sculpter... he starts with a big chunk of something. In his case a rather plain and boring intersection for example.
He then wonders around it and sees an image in his head.

Quote
I'm not behind the camera because I feel Like.....
I'm more concerned with an image that is in my mind.
Quote

In a certain sense photographers have an eyes and see an images and capture it. This fellow looks at something quite bland and closes his eyes
and the image is invented in his head and the production process starts.

I also find it interesting how he achieves an almost complete detachment and distance in the mood of a completely constructed and directed image.

I think he would make an extraordinary portrait photographer when he gets around to it....
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