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Author Topic: Which light brush ?  (Read 4034 times)
Alan Matuka
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« on: February 19, 2013, 05:48:41 AM »
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For some time I've been looking for a light brush, it would be a great help in my type of work.
When asked for recommendations Hosemaster and Broncolor were mentioned. As far as I know Hosemaster is far more complex and produces better result.
At some point I bought this light brush, it has no brand name on it so i don't know what make it is. Also, it seems there is a piece missing - focusing attachment at the front of the ' pistol '.

Does anyone know what make is it and where I could get light modifying attachments ?
Kind regards,
Alan
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Alan Matuka
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« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 06:46:25 AM »
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here is another picture of it...
sorry about the quality, shot with mobile  Roll Eyes
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DanielStone
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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 08:09:38 PM »
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don't know about a manufacturer, but what about getting some thing sheet metal(aluminum/galvanized steel, THING stuff) and making your own? That way you'd have EXACTLY what you need, from pin-point, to wide "brush" attachments.

some flat-black spray paint would help reduce reflections also.

just an idea

-Dan
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 09:12:58 PM »
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Hello,

I have a light brush nearly identical to yours.

The brand I have is called Light FX brush which I bought from the states back in ‘80s and comes with a hugh array of light modifiers which I have collected over the years. At the time it was the best of the bunch and it was day light balanced

Now the bad news is they don’t make it any more. I use it all the time and now with digital there's no mucking around with polaroids and film to worry about. I've even used it to light car interiors.

Ciao

Simon
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 11:09:23 PM by HarperPhotos » Logged

Simon Harper
Harper Photographics Ltd
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2013, 04:36:58 PM »
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Hello,

This is all the info I have about the light brush I have.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
Harper Photographics Ltd
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Auckland, New Zealand
bill t.
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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2013, 05:29:29 PM »
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Go down to Lowes and grab a half dozen flashlights covering the range of available sizes.  Tape some Kleenex and such over a couple of 'em, or for a more versatile system use rubber bands.  Bingo!  High quality CRI 100 lighting.  Have gotten very nice results from such, although it is not a look I chose to purse, even though Aaron Jones is one of my favorite people.  I knew the style had run its course when I started seeing lightbrushed forklift ads.

Bottom line, though, is that you need a range of brushes going all the way from small and rather spot-like, up to large and diffuse, and a few intermediate, mix&match possibilities.  Pick up a couple lens diffusion filters while you're at it.

Also, although exposure stacking was not available on the first go around for this stuff, it is available now and puts the potential for the process in a whole new ballpark.

edit...well, it's too late.  All those darned flashlights now use CRI 20 LED's.  Gone is the day.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 05:32:40 PM by bill t. » Logged
Colorwave
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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2013, 08:09:52 PM »
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Wow, seeing mention of Hosemaster takes me back.  I was around Aaron as his set designer/modelmaker when he was still developing the project.  At one point, it was housed in a metal bucket and affectionately nicknamed Bucket o'Rays.  I wasn't thrilled about the Hosemaster name for some time, but it grew on me, and it was unquestionably better than Bucket o'Rays. 

Those hour plus exposures with Aaron performing a hundred little gestures and effects within effects seem like ages ago.  Of course, almost everything was in camera still, too (except for a little occasional help from Raphael, the first real digital retoucher).  Aaron led the charge in killing off the hi-tec movement in advertising photography, when everything was as sterile as humanly possible.  Even CG renderings have more soul than what was in vogue at the time.  At his pinnacle, Aaron Jones represented one of the more extreme swings of the photography pendulum towards a painterly, romantic approach.

When Aaron moved to Washington State and got into motion control, it was astounding to see him using a dozen or so of the then commercially produced Hosemaster systems at once as a replacement for conventional lighting.  I doubt anybody else ever had the means to have that many of them at once, all in one studio, especially as substitutes for Dedo lights.

Shout out to Chris Harlocker, who put the final polish on the Hosemaster system and brought it to market, and is now a VP at Calumet.

(Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming . . .)

BTW:  If I had some money that I was wanting to dispose of, and I wanted the most badass glorified flashlight imaginable, I think I might pick up one of these:  http://gl1hotlight.com
Given the price, though, I think I'll wait around for the knockoffs, since the technology is pretty straightforward.
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Alan Matuka
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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2013, 04:03:06 AM »
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thank you for your replies  Smiley

first I'll take lightbrush for service ( fan is a bit noisy and after few minutes of working something plastic starts burning )...
I'll definitely make some light modifiers myself, and experiment.
Also, I expect there would be some Light FX on ebay ...
I've been told that Hosemater produced far superior result, and that is probably true. However, it does cost a fair bit.
Also, I had a look at old Broncolor model, and was not impressed at all.

I will let you know about results
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bill t.
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« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2013, 01:01:55 PM »
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Hosemaster could produce excellent results indeed.  Partly from design, and partly from the fact that a lot of the users attended Aaron's famous Hosemaster workshop.  IIRC, he even dragged along a large automated Ektachrome processor to those things.  Now that's dedication! It's only partly a matter of how good your hose is, it's mostly how you use it.  Light is light, however modest its source.
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Alan Matuka
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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2013, 02:31:27 PM »
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True, it's mostly how you use it.
However, if you need a pen-like tool to add some precise highlights it's hard to do it with a torch.
In any case it takes a lot of practice, and that's the key.


Hosemaster could produce excellent results indeed.  Partly from design, and partly from the fact that a lot of the users attended Aaron's famous Hosemaster workshop.  IIRC, he even dragged along a large automated Ektachrome processor to those things.  Now that's dedication! It's only partly a matter of how good your hose is, it's mostly how you use it.  Light is light, however modest its source.
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