Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: HPZ 3100 repair fix refurbishment DIY check list help needed  (Read 704 times)
dandeliondigital
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 224



WWW
« on: February 19, 2013, 01:57:31 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi all,
I use an HP Z3100ps 44" printer. I must first thank all of you (you know who you are) for the great contributions made to this forum over the years regarding the HPZ printer. Thanks for the help. I am very appreciative. This forum has gotten me out of quite a few "issues." 

Right now, it's time to change the drive belt, and more, and that's where I need some help.

Because I have to take a lot of the printer apart to do the belt replacement (thanks HP), I want to optimize my printer by replacing any other parts that might be worn out or maybe ready to go bad. My printer is close to 4 years, and I am aiming to take it back to a nice refurbished state. I love this printer (I wish I had a Z3200, but that's a long story).

I have seen other threads here posted with suggestions for various DIY repairs. Here is a list I've compiled after reading numerous threads here (if I am missing something please let me know):

A new drive belt (I have purchased one, am aware of the installation video, and have the tools and info)
A new service station (a big assembly on the right)
   & new spittoon (pads on the left)
Question: Is this the same as  waste tank assembly and the head cap station?
A new tensioner
A new disc knife
A new aerosol fan

Have seen the acronym: ESP. Does this stand for the "built-in spectrometer" or something else?

If anyone can elaborate on these items with important things like part numbers and best links/sources for parts, and user install techniques, tips, and tricks, I would be grateful.

Thanks in advance, and so long for now, TOM
Logged

www.dandeliondigital.com posters and prints
Colorwave
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 998


WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2013, 02:09:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Sorry for the tardy response, Tom.  This is the busy season for art in Hawaii, and I've been swamped.

For the service station, I had mine replaced by HP while I was under warranty, but don't think that a full replacement is absolutely necessary if the wipers are in good shape.  HP's solution to all repairs is to just swap out complete assemblies, and I'm sure that is the simplest thing, but I bet that part is pretty expensive if you have to buy it a la carte.  If it is mechanically sound, the critical part is the rubber wipers that clean the bottom of the printheads.  Those seem to hold up pretty well.  I haven't tried cleaning the ink tank in the service station, and would bet that it is rather messy to do, but see no reason why it couldn't be cleaned out in the interest of saving money.  You will probably find lots of ink, but take consolation that it is probably a fraction of what you would have to deal with if you owned an Epson wide format printer.

For the spittoon, that is an easy fix.  It's just an absorbent pad, and you can wash it out and revive it pretty easily.  I suggest that you clean it in a sink and then smash it between two flat plates of something with a vise or c-clamp to really wring it out, so it doesn't mildew.

I think that the belt tensioner is a pretty robust part, and am still on my first one.  Unless you have some sort of warning sign, I wouldn't expect you would need to replace it.

The cutter assembly is probably pretty cheap, so you might want to swap that out.  I replaced mine from my low mileage parts printer, just for good measure, but I never really had any issues with the original one.  It is easily replaced without opening the printer up (just remove the left end panel), so you might want to pull it out and lubricate the track and cutter and see how it performs afterward before buying a new one.

For the aerosol fan, I have replaced mine once, and cleaned it a couple of times.  You will probably be astounded how much ink collects on it, and I think that the added weight of the ink on the blades eventually wears out the motor.  It's also a pretty easy thing to replace without a complete teardown like the belt, and I'd probably just pull it out and clean it for now.  It looks to be a really run of the mill muffin fan, so you could probably find a replacement at almost any electronics supplier.

Other things:  I'd pull, clean and lubricate the plastic bushings in the carriage.  There are two c-shaped ones that run on the rail, and a little lubricated plastic glide on the back side.  It's astounding that they work with as many duty cycles as they do, and I would have expected a much more sophisticated linear bearing would be needed, but I guess the proof is in the pudding for them.

There is an oiler in the upper right side of the track that also lubricates the top carriage track/bearing.  It is a weird wick type fabric, and it seems to get chalky and brittle over time.  You would probably be well served to look up a part number for that and get another one.

ESP stands for Embedded Photospectrometer.  That's your color sensor.

For parts, I would read over the pertinent sections of the service manual and get the part numbers there.  I haven't found any source that carries a complete selection.  Most have somewhat limited selections, so you sometimes have to get them piecemeal.  There are several places run by ex-HP techs on eBay.  Use Google shopping, or other web searches to make sure you aren't getting ripped off.  When I thought I needed a Media Advance Calibration Tool, I found prices for that glorified screwdriver that ranged from $45 to $1,700, so you really need to do your homework.
Logged

dandeliondigital
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 224



WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2013, 04:53:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Ron,
You're the best. Thanks for all that information! I appreciate your taking the time.

Glad to hear it's busy there!

Thanks, and so long for now, TOM
Logged

www.dandeliondigital.com posters and prints
Charles Gast
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 250


« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2013, 11:04:09 PM »
ReplyReply

I did not replace the service station. I was able to partially unclamp the service station spittoon and use a disposable plastic spoon to scoop out around 180ml of ink. It was black goop and I highly recommend disposable gloves when working with that or anywhere around the spittoons. I don't do a great deal of printing so the spittoon was not to the point it actually required emptying.
 Once the carriage was off I took the opportunity to thoroughly clean the guide bar from end to end using the HP oil as cleaner/lubricant. When the printer is assembled this is not as easy. Be sure its the real HP oil. At least one reseller puts an HP part number on bottles of 3 in 1 oil. Maybe old news to you but worth mentioning.
 I'm not sure how familiar you are with disassembling things so here's a few pointers I think you may find useful. The ribbon cables for the carriage plug into a circuit board on the left of the printer. You need to carefully pry up the little rim around the socket until it pops up about 1.5mm. It does not come all the way off (unless you break it!) and once it pops up the cables are free to be pulled out of the sockets. When re-attaching the cables make sure the clamping piece is in the up position and you can fully seat the cables before pushing the little rim back down to secure the cables. These are little plastic parts which like to break so care is important.
  Removing the carriage with the ribbon cables requires care to avoid damaging the cables. Any hurry will mean ordering more parts. I did not bother to replace the double sided tape holding the ribbon cables down. I carefully pulled the cable up peeling it from the tape and when I put it back together it was still sticky and held the ribbon down just fine. Getting the ink tubes assembly out of the way while easing the carriage with the ribbon cables down the rail and free of the tubes assembly was a bit of a rumba dance. I was very careful about not pinching or scraping the tubes since they constantly flex back and forth during operation and a nick or scratch may lead to a split over time.
 While it was all apart I did a lot of vacuuming of the internals. I was surprised it wasn't more dusty after 6 years.  I also put the screws and hardware for each part I removed in a sandwich bag and taped it to that part. That kept me from wasting time figuring out which screws went with which part. Its always a good feeling to find no leftover screws after having a machine put back together  Grin
 
Logged
dandeliondigital
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 224



WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2013, 07:53:45 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Charles,
Thanks for adding your ideas to this thread.

I think I am in the same state as you are, because sadly, I haven't been doing a great deal of printing recently, still working to get back into a productive stage. I may not have to replace the service station, per your comments, and that would save some $$$.

I had to laugh when you said at least one reseller puts an HP part number on bottles of 3 in 1 oil.  I think I may have been the first one to fall for this fraud and bought a bottle years ago, and I did get a refund but what a hassle. FYI, I did eventually get a bottle of the genuine HP oil, and oil the rail religiously. Any other points need oil that I am overlooking?

"Put the screws and hardware for each part I removed in a sandwich bag and taped it to that part." I love reminders like this, (so smart and E-Z).

I'm a bit nervous hearing about the ribbon cables, but forewarned is the best.

I plan on tackling this refurb project in the next month or so, so thanks for the continued interest. If you remember any more gems, please let us know.

Thanks, and so long for now, TOM
Logged

www.dandeliondigital.com posters and prints
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad