Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Looking for Epson's 4 grease lubricants for my 9900  (Read 4945 times)
Dan Berg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1535



WWW
« on: February 19, 2013, 06:17:09 PM »
ReplyReply

On pages 415-422 of the Epson 7900/9900 service manual it covers in very good detail the lubrication process for these machines.
It requires 4 different lubricants. G-45,G-71 blue,G-84 and G-74
Has anyone here purchased any of these and if so,where?
Hopefully they are sold in affordable small tubes.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 06:20:30 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

Dan Berg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1535



WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 07:02:38 PM »
ReplyReply

After a little research it looks like Compass Micro in Oregon has them.
They are emailing the prices and availability. All the guy would tell me is that he knew it was pretty expensive.


Just got the email from Compass. $218.00 + shipping for the 4.
1.4 oz. each comes to about $40.00 an ounce.
Think I will go back to the manual and see if I really need all 4.
Anyone here using these and which ones?
« Last Edit: February 19, 2013, 08:24:50 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

Ernst Dinkla
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2890


« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 02:12:00 AM »
ReplyReply

To replace an HP oil I checked its specification (Nye 179) and found a 99% compatible one in Nye's Hobbyist Lubricant Kit. The Nye 179 itself was only available in large containers. The price difference was not that much (compared to HP's smaller bottle) but the same kit contained an excellent grease and a thicker oil next to the very fluid oil I needed. Ordered it from a company in Europe that supplies camera repair shops. I use the oils for any precision mechanism and the grease also for the monthly lubrication of the Saeco espresso machine, a very important machine in this building. The kit was less than $50. You do not know the Epson specs and it will be hard to get them but I think you will come a long way with this kit if used sensible; metal/metal, metal/plastics, fast light movements and slow heavy loaded movements. Read the specs of Nye or a Wiki on synthetic oils. A can with Teflon and a cloth does wonders on other parts like on ink tubes bending against one another etc.

--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 03:50:34 AM by Ernst Dinkla » Logged
Eric Gulbransen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 300


never surrender


WWW
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2013, 10:41:08 PM »
ReplyReply

I say a group purchase is in order.  Let's get a few 99/11880 owners and divy it up.  Too important.  Lube is everything.
Logged

Dan Berg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1535



WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2013, 08:30:49 AM »
ReplyReply

Let me look over the lube suggestions and I will let you know if all of these are needed right from the start.
Just a little info from the lube page. "Necessary lubrication to maintain the functions and performance" "Otherwise the printer may not operate normally"
So where is this important information in our printer guide?

Epson Stylus Pro 7700/7710/7900/7910/9700/9710/9900/9910/WT7900/WT7910
6.5 Lubrication LUBRICATION   10
This section describes necessary lubrication to maintain the functions and performance   11 of this printer. Make sure to properly lubricate the parts/units specified in this section as necessary when replacing or maintaining them.
Revision E
Reference
p.420 p.421
415
Lubrication No.
Corresponding Part
CR Guide Shaft (Full) Roll Paper Guide Rail
Name of Lubricant
Part name: G-84 Part code: 1516265 Part name: G-74 Part code: 1409257
CAUTION
␣ Make sure to perform the lubrication following the specified lubrication points, lubricants, and amount. Otherwise, the printer may not operate normally.
␣ When lubricating the originally installed parts, first wipe off the old lubricant completely.
LUBRICATION POINTS LIST
Lubrication No.
Corresponding Part
Name of Lubricant
Part name: G-45
Part code: 1033657
Part name: G-45
Part code: 1033657
Part name: G-45 Part code: 1033657
Part name: G-45
Part code: 1033657
Part name: G-45
Part code: 1033657
Part name: G-71 (BLUE) Part code: 1480655
Part name: G-84 Part code: 1516265 Part name: G-84 Part code: 1516265
Part name: G-84 Part code: 1516265
Reference
p.416 p.416 p.417 p.417 p.418 p.418 p.419 p.419 p.420
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 08:51:50 AM by Dan Berg » Logged

Ernst Dinkla
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2890


« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2013, 10:46:45 AM »
ReplyReply

I say a group purchase is in order.  Let's get a few 99/11880 owners and divy it up.  Too important.  Lube is everything.

Not too many owners I would suggest, the oil will be 50 ML in one tube per quality :-)


--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.

Logged
darlingm
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 349


WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2013, 11:32:35 AM »
ReplyReply

I'd have to know more details, but I might have interest in a group purchase if someone puts one together.  My 9900's carriage assembly makes a squeaking noise sliding along its rail when it's around 40-44" (on the left.)
Logged

Mike Westland Printworks
Fine Art Printing Amazing Artwork Reproduction Photography
http://www.westlandprintworks.com (734) 255-9761
bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2711


WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2013, 03:22:53 PM »
ReplyReply

Maybe a little WD40, Lithium grease, Vaseline, nose oil, or just about any lubricant applied sparingly would be better than nothing.  Yeah, my 9880 used to make those left-side squeeks, too.  Does Jiffy Lube do 9900's?

What I learned in my forays into industrial design is that the properties of lubricants and other manufacturing consumables are often more geared to the requirements of the automated machinery dispensing them, rather than to the end device itself which generally has much wider tolerances.
Logged
na goodman
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 356


« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2013, 06:00:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Dan you may want to look around a little bit more. For some reason I think it may be made by 3M but I'm not sure. Here's a site that carried it
that does not any longer but you may want to contact them and get more information.
http://www.lambda-tek.com/1480655-GREASE-G-71-BLUE-~cs/B557507
Logged
Dan Berg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1535



WWW
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2013, 06:48:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Thank you Nancy,exactly what I am doing.
Will let you folks know what I find out.
Logged

Eric Gulbransen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 300


never surrender


WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2013, 11:22:43 PM »
ReplyReply

I'd have to know more details, but I might have interest in a group purchase if someone puts one together.  My 9900's carriage assembly makes a squeaking noise sliding along its rail when it's around 40-44" (on the left.)

Please I agree with bill, anything is better than nothing.  The Juggler's 11880 squeaked too, then the band broke.  Most machines I've taken apart the carriage glides like butter, which leads me to think that's the way they should be.  

I wonder, out loud, among all the moving parts on the bikes I race at 180mph, no oil, no grease, no fluid and no lube costs more than $20 a quart - full retail.  And this is 400lbs being thrashed around at 12,000 rpm in 110 degree heat with boiling coolant bursting at the seams of the radiator.  ....And dirt and dust in the air as well!  Let's keep this in perspective here - we're talking about a 1lb carriage sliding back and forth on fixed steel rails at the ever threatening pace of a Koala Bear in hot pursuit of a Ucalyptus branch.  

Am I missing something here?
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 11:24:15 PM by Eric Gulbransen » Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad