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Author Topic: Architectural / interior photography - best equipment?  (Read 16818 times)
Yelhsa
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« Reply #160 on: March 23, 2013, 09:51:27 AM »
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however the client wanted darker and "moody"  (whatever that means...I simply hate this 'direction')  
To me, that would mean either a night time look or a late evening look - rather than the look one would except to see on a sunny day.

Example of dark & moody...

.. as opposed to bright & airy...

.. of the same room.


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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #161 on: March 23, 2013, 09:52:49 AM »
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Hi, looking at the images its obvious to me that its a VERY tough subject to shoot.

On your lighted image there are some very nasty shadows and the color temp of the flashes is a little too separated (in temperature) from the available lights. I would have gelled the flashes with about 1/4 CTO (maybe 1/2?), increased the ambient light exposure up a little bit so it mixes for with the flash (and filled in the shadows a bit) and turned on the fan so that the harsh shadow on the ceiling is smoothed a little bit.

Then in post try to adjust color and highlights/shadows to taste (which you obviously did to please your client) and maybe do a bit of dodging and burning here and there.

Regarding the styling I would have probably removed the basket near the window on the left, the bag in front of the coffee pot. Also, dunno about the carrots and the cloth on the foreground, look a little to unrealistic to me the way they are placed, maybe I wouldve used a cutting board as prop, dunno.

Composition wise its good (not much options there!) I might have tried to include the entire table in the foreground (maybe wider lens? or position the camera lower?) but dunno for sure.

Anyway, what matters is that the client is happy and just move on to the next job  Smiley

But thanks for posting, it shows how to make something out of nothing.

Interesting thoughts, thanks.  But dude, that was shot with a 12mm on a full frame 35mm...and the camera was flush with the back wall.

Styling is so personal but to be frank, we (my wife and I) shoot about 100 of these trailers a year.  And then they throw the images away and we shoot the same updated trailers again..and again...and again.  We have a pile of props and we buy constantly, but it gets very hard to keep the styling fresh. And generally we have a single day to shoot, often 10 or 15 images.  Gone are the days we would send an entire day on a major interior.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2013, 10:02:28 AM by Craig Lamson » Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #162 on: March 23, 2013, 09:55:15 AM »
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To me, that would mean either a night time look or a late evening look - rather than the look one would except to see on a sunny day.

Example of dark & moody...

.. as opposed to bright & airy...

.. of the same room.




What were you selling, the ambience or the fabrics, finishes and layout?
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Ken R
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« Reply #163 on: March 23, 2013, 10:12:32 AM »
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Interesting thoughts, thanks.  But dude, that was shot with a 12mm on a full frame 35mm...and the camera was flush with the back wall.

Styling is so personal but to be frank, we (my wife and I) shoot about 100 of these trailers a year.  And then they throw the images away and we shoot the same updated trailers again..and again...and again.  We have a pile of props and we buy constantly, but it gets very hard to keep the styling fresh. And generally we have a single day to shoot, often 10 or 15 images.  Gone are the days we would send an entire day on a major interior.

Oh my, thats a LOT of trailers!  Shocked  (good for business though Smiley )

I know the feeling of being against the wall with the widest lens available (mine is a 14mm L II) when shooting interiors. I used to have the Sigma 12-24 but the 14 L II was so much better I sold the Sigma and make do with 14mm although I might buy another one just for situations like the one you posted. That is one aspect where Medium Format lacks, well, there is now the HCAM-B1. Put a 14mm or 17 TSE on that and its probably the widest rectilinear image one can make. Would love to try it.
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Yelhsa
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« Reply #164 on: March 23, 2013, 10:24:23 AM »
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What were you selling, the ambience or the fabrics, finishes and layout?
I just sell the Rights to use my images  Wink

The client here, a hotel, was wanting me to provide them with some images to help them sell their various rooms - this being one of them.
So we shot it both ways, as they liked the idea of a dark & mood image - to appeal to the weekend market (couples / females).
However, for the business market (business people staying during the week), they liked the idea of a more bright & airy image.

So it was more about selling the look in this case - as the fabrics, finishes and layout didn't change - which is why I posted them.  



 
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #165 on: March 23, 2013, 10:27:52 AM »
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Oh my, thats a LOT of trailers!  Shocked  (good for business though Smiley )

I know the feeling of being against the wall with the widest lens available (mine is a 14mm L II) when shooting interiors. I used to have the Sigma 12-24 but the 14 L II was so much better I sold the Sigma and make do with 14mm although I might buy another one just for situations like the one you posted. That is one aspect where Medium Format lacks, well, there is now the HCAM-B1. Put a 14mm or 17 TSE on that and its probably the widest rectilinear image one can make. Would love to try it.

Lack of a really wide lens is what has kept me out of MFD.  Used to use the 65 and 75  when we shot 4x5 film.  The Sigma is far from perfect, but it works so well for my needs.  And quite frankly none of my clients would notice the difference if I could shoot MFD.  Most of this stuff never goes beyond 11x17 on press.

For perspective, this is the floor plan for the original photos I posted. 39 feet long and 8 feet wide without the slide outs.

BTW, I do appreciate the the comments and suggestions from everyone, thanks.

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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #166 on: March 23, 2013, 10:35:46 AM »
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I just sell the Rights to use my images  Wink

The client here, a hotel, was wanting me to provide them with some images to help them sell their various rooms - this being one of them.
So we shot it both ways, as they liked the idea of a dark & mood image - to appeal to the weekend market (couples / females).
However, for the business market (business people staying during the week), they liked the idea of a more bright & airy image.

So it was more about selling the look in this case - as the fabrics, finishes and layout didn't change - which is why I posted them.  



 

I know why you posted them, but my point, which I think you know as well, was that different client needs require different approaches to fulfill a similar client demand, like "dark and moody".

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Doug Peterson
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« Reply #167 on: March 23, 2013, 11:01:36 AM »
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Lack of a really wide lens is what has kept me out of MFD.  Used to use the 65 and 75  when we shot 4x5 film.  The Sigma is far from perfect, but it works so well for my needs.  And quite frankly none of my clients would notice the difference if I could shoot MFD.  Most of this stuff never goes beyond 11x17 on press.

I don't understand, an IQ260, HCam or Alpa FPS, and a 17mm TS or the new Canon Fisheye are great ultra-wide options in medium format.

Or a Rodenstock 23HR. The equivalent to a 13mm or 15mm FF dSLR lens (depending on if using vertical, horizontal, or diagonal for comparison).

Resolution (size of print) is only one image quality advantage of medium format. It's easy to focus on because there is an easy-to-reference number. But the visual rendering (color, tonality, file-malleability, dimensionality, microcontrast) are all different.
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MrSmith
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« Reply #168 on: March 23, 2013, 11:29:02 AM »
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I don't understand,

happy client, easily acquired depth of field(cramped working conditions and lots of depth of field for the whole trailer to be in focus) and a not insignificant amount of $ saved. makes perfect sense to me.
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Ken R
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« Reply #169 on: March 23, 2013, 12:21:38 PM »
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happy client, easily acquired depth of field(cramped working conditions and lots of depth of field for the whole trailer to be in focus) and a not insignificant amount of $ saved. makes perfect sense to me.

Exactly, it's all about the service.

This image I am posting is for a aluminum and glass window manufacturer. Its part of layout (which I dont have right now) that includes some text and lines (hence some space had to be left for it) and its before it was retouched and cropped. This was just my output from lightroom. I had to use about 4 profoto heads IIRC. At least one was outside off-frame with the magnum reflector. This is a combination Architecture / People  shot that usually HAS to be lit. I have done the same with ARRi tungsten lights but this time I needed a lot more power being it was full daylight (client request). I wanted it to be more of an evening shot, oh well. (I used a "lowly" Canon 5D3 and the 24mm TSE II)

« Last Edit: March 23, 2013, 12:23:12 PM by Ken R » Logged
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