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Author Topic: high precision photographs - print option  (Read 1064 times)
mstevensphoto
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« on: February 25, 2013, 04:06:11 PM »
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when/why/why not do you select "high precision photographs" when printing directly from cs6? I notice a real difference in things with text, but it's hardly worth the 4x time spent making a print...what's the setting good/best for?
Mark
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aaronchan
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2013, 04:25:47 PM »
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are you talking about the canon ipf printers?

aaron
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bill t.
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2013, 04:41:02 PM »
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Relatively small prints from very high resolution images with near-pixel-level detail such as grasses, when you are printing on perfectly smooth paper, and you are jamming more than about 600 file pixels onto an inch of print surface.  I have seen differences in those conditions.  Would be a wasted effort for canvas or most papers with even a small amount of surface texture.
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Ken
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2013, 08:14:07 PM »
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Quote
select "high precision photographs"

Photoshop CS6? Where?
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bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2013, 10:12:23 PM »
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In the Photoshop File->Print dialogue.  Thus, except with smaller prints on smooth paper and definitely not on canvas...


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hugowolf
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« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2013, 10:22:04 PM »
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In the Photoshop File->Print dialogue.  Thus, except with smaller prints on smooth paper and definitely not on canvas...
That is the Canon 6300 dialog, it has nothing to do with Photoshop.

Brian A
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bill t.
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« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2013, 10:53:19 PM »
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That is Photoshop's default printer dialogue, tailored in this case to an iPF8300.  Or more exactly, it is the properties box for that particular printer.  My Epson printers had basically the same dialogue available, with a few printer-specific customizations including an available high resolution mode.  Quite separate from that there is an elaborate and somewhat bloated printer dialogue from Canon, which I think is available through File->Export, but the dialogue shown above is not that.
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2013, 07:28:03 AM »
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The screen shot is Canon's print dialog accessed through Photoshop.
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Randy Carone
hugowolf
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« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2013, 01:49:38 PM »
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That is Photoshop's default printer dialogue, tailored in this case to an iPF8300.  Or more exactly, it is the properties box for that particular printer.  My Epson printers had basically the same dialogue available, with a few printer-specific customizations including an available high resolution mode.  Quite separate from that there is an elaborate and somewhat bloated printer dialogue from Canon, which I think is available through File->Export, but the dialogue shown above is not that.
It has nothing to do with Photoshop. You can access the same 6300 dialog from several other apps and directly by going to Printers, then right clicking on the 6300 icon and selecting Printing Preferences.

Brian A
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mstevensphoto
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« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2013, 01:32:35 PM »
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whether the option is photoshop, canon or a sticky note on your monitor, I was hoping the discussion would be about why to/not use it....thanks for answering that Bill.
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Schewe
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« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2013, 01:38:14 PM »
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...I was hoping the discussion would be about why to/not use it....

Try reading this and come back with any questions...The Right Resolution
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Ken
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« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2013, 01:38:42 PM »
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whether the option is photoshop, canon or a sticky note on your monitor, I was hoping the discussion would be about why to/not use it....thanks for answering that Bill.
Your question was "what's the setting good/best for?" Apparently it was specific to your Canon printer. If I had known that, I wouldn't have wasted my time trying to figure out what you were looking for.
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2013, 03:15:38 PM »
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ms

In order to get an answer, you have to ask the right question. The Canon setting to which you refer slows down the print process to reduce printer movement and to facilitate a more precise dot pattern. I believe it also prints at a higher resolution.
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Randy Carone
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