Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Next Lens Addition  (Read 2120 times)
Slim
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 190



WWW
« on: February 25, 2013, 11:51:21 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Everyone,

First time posting in this section.
Looking for ideas and things I'm not considering it my search for additional lenses.

I have 4 lens in my arsenal currently.  Canon's F4 24-105L, F4 100-400L, F2.8 100mm macro, and Zeiss ZE 2/35.  I've got two bodies, a FF 6D and 1.3x 1D Mark ii.  FF is getting more use now since it's FF and I take landscapes more (obviously).

With the exception of the macro lens, the other three really cover a broad range of applications in landscape photography.
The Zeiss 2/35 is currently my favorite, although I get more use out of the 24-105L.  And despite the 24-105L being the broad kit L lens that most people have,
I find it's pretty darn sharp.  The F2.8 24-70 seems to be the preferred lens of many photographers because of the bokeh that 2.8 provides, but since my focus is on landscapes, I think the F2.8 will not get used much at all.  The 100-400 gets used occasionally, and the F2.8 100mm macro is for other things.

On my last trip to urban areas, I kept wishing I had the TSE-24.  I felt that the Tilt Shift capability would give me a capability that I cannot get any other way.

Other lenses I'm also considering are the Zeiss 21mm - Wide Angle Prime lens.  I don't think i need auto focus for wide angle primes generally, but looking for feedback here.
Another one is the 85mm 1.2 L - I'm just liking this lens only because of the F1.2 capability and it might inspire me to be a people photographer, but I have a feeling I would find little practical use out of it.
Also, what is an ideal lense to stitch with on Canon?  Could the 85 be ideal here too?

Other lens suggestions, ideas, feedback, questions, (maybe even derision?!)?  
« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 10:16:37 AM by Slim » Logged

dhancock
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 136



WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2013, 07:35:19 AM »
ReplyReply

I've heard some good things about the Canon 50mm f/1.8. I've heard it has surprising quality for the price - comparatively disposable.
Logged

DanielHancockPhotography.com

Don't stop shooting!
markmullen
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 53


WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2013, 08:20:34 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm in a similar situation, using a 5D3 and 1Ds2 with 17-40, 24-105, 135 F2 and 100-400, so a very similar lineup.

I think the TS-E 24mm is going to be my next purchase, possibly this weekend at the Focus On Imaging show here in the UK. I am torn between that and a Zeiss 21mm. My thinking is that as I'm not shooting wide open I won't miss a huge amount, other than IQ, from the 21mm but the TS-E brings in a whole new raft of possibilities.
Logged
snoleoprd
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 425



WWW
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2013, 08:43:22 AM »
ReplyReply

It is hard to beat the Zeiss 21mm for the micro contrast, I really like mine a lot. The 24mm ts is a great lens however it is expensive, I would probably wait to see what the Samyang 24mm ts looks like and wait for some reviews. Samyang makes excellent lenses and their 24mm ts is due this year and for $1,000, so way less than the Canon. If the optics are as good as their other lenses this will be a great buy.

Alan
Logged

Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA
markmullen
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 53


WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2013, 09:24:31 AM »
ReplyReply

I had a play with the Samyang 24mm tilt shift at Photokina last year, was a nicely made piece of kit. I couldn't try it out but no reason to suggest it won't be good.
Logged
francois
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6819


« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2013, 09:28:11 AM »
ReplyReply

I've heard some good things about the Canon 50mm f/1.8. I've heard it has surprising quality for the price - comparatively disposable.

Yes, the cheap 50mm f/1.8 is a good performer. With its current retail price and weight/size it's a lens to consider.
Logged

Francois
DaveCurtis
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 455


WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2013, 01:19:41 AM »
ReplyReply

I can second the Zeiss 21mm. It's my favourite wide.

Very nice colour and high micro contrast. The 24mm TSE is at least as sharp but the images dont have the same zing.
Logged

Slim
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 190



WWW
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2013, 09:13:09 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for the feedback everyone.  An update from the Asset Acquistions Department:

- TSE 24L mk ii is on the way.

For those of who gave me other advice on getting something else.  Don't worry as I will eventually get the Zeiss 21.

I was also given something else to think about which I am thinking more seriously about is -
Getting the best lowest distortion, extremely sharp longer focal length lens - Let's say between 50mm to 100mm and learning to stitch photos together.  This will help me make up for my low 20MP count camera. Grin

Any advice here from Canon EF users?  Cost is not as issue, but don't want to spend it unnecesarally.
Logged

DeanChriss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 280


WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2013, 12:08:33 PM »
ReplyReply

...
I was also given something else to think about which I am thinking more seriously about is -
Getting the best lowest distortion, extremely sharp longer focal length lens - Let's say between 50mm to 100mm and learning to stitch photos together.  This will help me make up for my low 20MP count camera. Grin

The 90mm TS-E  is extremely sharp. Using the shift and moving the camera body the same distance in the opposite direction makes images completely free of parallax that stitch perfectly. There's no need for everything to be level since there's no rotation of the setup. This technique keeps the lens in a fixed position while moving the sensor behind it. Because the extremes of shift produce only 2 overlapping shots (though it's best to use one in the middle also) this won't make extremely wide panoramas, but it's great for high MP "semi-panoramic" images and it works well for macro also.

Added: Using the same technique but shifting a vertical image horizontally gives a stitched high MP image with a fairly "normal" aspect ratio of around 4:5.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2013, 12:15:56 PM by DeanChriss » Logged

- Dean
Jim Pascoe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 789


WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2013, 12:54:46 PM »
ReplyReply

I can say that the Zeiss 50/2 Macro lens is really superb.  Even at f2 it's beautiful, and that's how I use it mostly.  But on a trip to Tuscany last year I used it for landscapes and at f8 it was outstanding.

Jim
Logged
Ellis Vener
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1801



WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2013, 12:55:59 PM »
ReplyReply

The lenses I most use when making stitched panoramas are the EF 50mm f/1.4 and EF 85mm f/1.8 . I stitch using PTGui Pro. Most of my panoramic work is of cityscapes.
Logged

Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
JohnBrew
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 746


WWW
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2013, 01:16:35 PM »
ReplyReply

No Canon here, but another vote for the 85 as a stitching lens. I recently finished a 20" x 5' stitched pano which had all the detail and micro-contrast one could want.
Logged

mgear
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2013, 04:56:14 PM »
ReplyReply

This might sound dumb compared to other suggestions, but what about the 40mm 2.8?

It isn't very fast but it's sharp wide open and has super quick and quiet AF.

One downside though is that it will make your camera look silly due to its pancake construction.
Logged
Slim
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 190



WWW
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2013, 10:49:05 PM »
ReplyReply

This might sound dumb compared to other suggestions, but what about the 40mm 2.8?

It isn't very fast but it's sharp wide open and has super quick and quiet AF.

One downside though is that it will make your camera look silly due to its pancake construction.

Definitely not silly.  I try to remind myself not to make photography too much about expensive equipment.  Work with what works.
However I already have a 35mm, so for that reason alone the 40mm is not on my radar as a priority purchase.
Logged

francois
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6819


« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2013, 03:14:24 AM »
ReplyReply

I can say that the Zeiss 50/2 Macro lens is really superb.  Even at f2 it's beautiful, and that's how I use it mostly.  But on a trip to Tuscany last year I used it for landscapes and at f8 it was outstanding.

Jim

I'm with you, Jim. The Zeiss 50/2 Macro is wonderfully, even fully open. I'm using it for landscape photography and other stuff. Compared to my Canon EF 50 f/1.8, it is in another league for image quality (but also for price and weight).
Logged

Francois
jeffreybehr
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 275


WWW
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2013, 04:52:49 PM »
ReplyReply

I've been wrestling with the same sort of question, for me on the WA end.  I've had and loved a TS-E24, and its shifts gave me 3 frames to stitch quickly and seamlessly in PS.  One can get to about 2.25:1 AR with the shifts.  These high-AR images worked well with a 24 "-wide printer printed as small as c. 22X10" and as large as c. 50X22".


But I'm now limited to a 19X13" printer, and I too have a 24-105 on a 6D.  After having and loving a Zeiss Distagon T* 28/2.8 in my 1Ds days, I just bought a ZE-version 21/2.8.  I hope I love that as much.
Logged

PhotoEcosse
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 617



« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2013, 05:40:55 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Everyone,

First time posting in this section.
Looking for ideas and things I'm not considering it my search for additional lenses.



With respect, this seems a very strange way to choose a lens. The rational process would be to wait until you have a photographic requirement that cannot be adequately met by any of your existing lenses and then decide which additional lens might solve that problem.

Otherwise you will end up with a collection of lenses that meet other photographers' needs rather than your own.
Logged

************************************
"Reality is an illusion caused by lack of alcohol."
Alternatively, "Life begins at the far end of your comfort zone."
Slim
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 190



WWW
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2013, 07:33:43 PM »
ReplyReply

With respect, this seems a very strange way to choose a lens. The rational process would be to wait until you have a photographic requirement that cannot be adequately met by any of your existing lenses and then decide which additional lens might solve that problem.

Otherwise you will end up with a collection of lenses that meet other photographers' needs rather than your own.

My requirement is to take the best possible high quality photos in different situations and have maximum flexibility on how I want to take them.  I have limited time to shoot and to me this is the real expense.  It's not the expense of the lens.  I don't want to be in a location and find out that I don't have the ideal lens to shoot with.  Then I've essentially wasted my time, and an opportunity that may never arise again.

I was considering three options:  Tilt Shift, Wider Angle Prime, and longer focal length prime that I can stitch with.  I ultimately decided on the TSE as it gives me the most bang for my buck and it can do things that can not be faked or worked around.  But I will also eventually get other lenses as well.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad