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Author Topic: How to convert a pano to a triptych  (Read 1694 times)
Justan
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« on: February 26, 2013, 11:33:48 PM »
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Someone asked me to convert one of my panos to a triptych. I haven’t done this before. Can anyone suggest a good way to do this with either CS5 or Qimage Ultimate?

The border will be .5” for all 4 sides of each segment. They are requesting the segments to be ¼ ½ ¼

Is it as simple as copying the segments to their own file and increasing the canvas size for the border or is there another way?

It would be great to print the 3 segments as 1 contiguous print and then cut after the print is made.

Thanks in advance!!
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 04:05:10 AM »
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The Photoshop way explained below. (From an online tutorial.)
I personally use Perfect Resize from OnOne Software,simple and quick.
Turn tiling on and fill in the size boxes. Apply and save to folder,done.

Here is one way using guides make sure snap to guides is currently active using menu view> snap to.
Lay down guide line using menu view> new guide (Shift+Ctrl+R)
In the Dialog use Percentage

Horizontal 0% and 100%
Vertical 0%, 33.333%, 66.666% and 100%


 Use the rectangle selection tool set to normal pull out a selection 0%,0% to 33.333%,100% Ctrl+C Ctrl+V Copy paste

re-target the background drag out a center selection 0%,33.333% to 66.666%,100% then Ctrl+C Ctrl+V Copy paste

re-target the background drag out a right selection 0%,66.666% to 100%,100% then Ctrl+C Ctrl+V Copy paste

You should not have four layers
The full pano background layer and three layers above it each 1/3 of the pano

Dupe the document three time and in the dups delete all layers but for one of the 1/3 so you have layer 1, 2 and 3 in their own document. Ctrl+Click on the layer icon in the layer palette to select the layers pixels the use menu Image crop
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 04:12:37 AM by Dan Berg » Logged

Justan
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2013, 09:37:41 AM »
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^^!!THANK YOU, Dan!!^^
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LoisWakeman
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2013, 02:28:02 PM »
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Justan - off topic, but I have been wondering whether to buy Qimage ultimate. Do you think it is worth the upgrade?

(FWIW, I did a triptych by calculation, sizing in Qimage pro, then working out the overlaps necessary in px to allow for gallery wrapping. It was pretty tedious and until I saw the finished product I was never convinced it would match up, so any more automated route is well worth doing, I would think!)
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2013, 04:38:36 PM »
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Lois,
You really should give Perfect Resize's tiling feature a try.
Has a simple overlap function where all you do is insert the overlap dimension.
The last one I did took no more then a couple of minutes.

I do large Phototex wall panels and the tiling and overlap function is invaluable.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 04:47:06 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

bill t.
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2013, 08:38:50 PM »
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Here's how people who actually know how to use PS do it, as opposed to the way I do it.  I wouldn't have even watched it, but she's wearing a ponytail, and I even learned something.  And she's one of those folks who can do EVERYTHING with keystrokes, which I have not been able to do since the original DOS Wordstar.

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/the-complete-picture-with-julieanne-kost/creating-a-triptych/

BTW those who are are using Resize 7 should definitely upgrade to the fairly recent 7.5.  Big improvements all around including (I'm pretty sure) in the basic resize algorithm, and much faster.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 08:40:34 PM by bill t. » Logged
Justan
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« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2013, 07:47:44 AM »
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Justan - off topic, but I have been wondering whether to buy Qimage ultimate. Do you think it is worth the upgrade?

I do. I use it for printing everything from business cards to 8' long panos. I have not used even a small part of its overall capabilities.

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(FWIW, I did a triptych by calculation, sizing in Qimage pro, then working out the overlaps necessary in px to allow for gallery wrapping. It was pretty tedious and until I saw the finished product I was never convinced it would match up, so any more automated route is well worth doing, I would think!)

I don't do wraps so can't comment on that.
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Justan
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« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2013, 07:51:36 AM »
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Here's how people who actually know how to use PS do it, as opposed to the way I do it.  I wouldn't have even watched it, but she's wearing a ponytail, and I even learned something.  And she's one of those folks who can do EVERYTHING with keystrokes, which I have not been able to do since the original DOS Wordstar.

http://tv.adobe.com/watch/the-complete-picture-with-julieanne-kost/creating-a-triptych/

BTW those who are are using Resize 7 should definitely upgrade to the fairly recent 7.5.  Big improvements all around including (I'm pretty sure) in the basic resize algorithm, and much faster.

Thanks. I saw that video before posting. It doesn’t address what I’m after, which is to break a single looooong image into 3 parts and put some space between the parts, but the video does a great job of addressing how to take 3 different images, even of different sizes, and put them together into a triptych with uniform sizes for each panel.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2013, 08:15:41 AM »
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Justan, are you printing each segment separately then framing them individually (within a tryptych mat) or are (were) you printing it as a single document to be framed within a tryptych cut mat?

If the latter you could increase your canvas size, create a fixed size rectangle of the dimensions of the required segment, place it on one edge of the image then use the Move tool to simply move the segment the required distance.  Repeat on the other side.  The space between the segments will be black but will be covered by the mat.  If you want to make it white, make another fixed size rectangle the same width as the space between the segments, place it in the proper place and fill it with white.  Example attached.

Keep in mind that you aren't restricted to the 1/3 segments either.  You could make the left and right segments larger or smaller than the middle segment, although both of those outer one should be the same size.
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Justan
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« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2013, 08:30:24 AM »
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The goal is to frame as 3 separate panels at roughly 24” + 48” + 24” on the long side.

This will be printed on canvas and coated with Glamour II.

For printing and coating, I want to put suitable white space around each segment.

After the coating has cured, I’ll cut into 3 segments and trim out most of the white space, then mount on gator and put in 3 frames.

You’ve presented the simplest solution I’ve come across.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2013, 10:49:51 AM »
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If you're printing on a single sheet then cutting later, then I think the approach I outlined makes sense.  You don't even need to be as precise in the gap between the segments.  Glad it might work for you.
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bill t.
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« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2013, 12:14:19 PM »
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The basic aesthetic question is...do you want to present your image as though it was a continuous, unsevered view seen through a three-pane window, or do you want to slice off the wings of the image and move them to the sides.

The "window" technique loses parts of the image but preserves the continuity of perspective lines over the entire set of panes.  The "move" technique preserves all pieces of the image, but upsets perspective lines.  So in your particular image is the preservation of perspective more important than the parts of the image that might be window-blocked?

Triptych's are really hot on ebay right now.  Better jump on this little trick before the competition does...

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7167/6762489377_631491f76b_o.jpg
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Justan
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« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2013, 12:20:53 PM »
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It will be a one-off by request from one of my HS clients.

I prefer continuous images.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2013, 12:38:56 PM »
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The basic aesthetic question is...do you want to present your image as though it was a continuous, unsevered view seen through a three-pane window, or do you want to slice off the wings of the image and move them to the sides.


The image would go a long way in determining that, wouldn't it?  And whether that 'continuity' is visually important.
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bill t.
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« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2013, 02:00:18 PM »
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The image would go a long way in determining that, wouldn't it?  And whether that 'continuity' is visually important.

It's not an obvious call.  In the your excellent "tryptch.jpg" a few posts above the break in the perspective lines sort of lifts the overall set, the side panels act like wings in a way.  With aligned perspective lines I think the side panels might pull it down a bit.  Always better to have a soaring image than a sagging one.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2013, 02:20:38 PM »
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Fair points.  Not really something I've given much thought to since it's not something I produce.
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