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Author Topic: Re: Recent Professional Works 2  (Read 187589 times)
JoeKitchen
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« Reply #720 on: September 21, 2013, 07:03:59 AM »
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Shot these recently, very cool project.  That curved wall is actually 1x3 inch (about that size) rectangles of vinyl sown together and wrapped around a somewhat soft material.  Kind of cool. 
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
Rob C
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« Reply #721 on: September 21, 2013, 09:20:11 AM »
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When I click the image, my browser opens a small window with a bigger version of the image. The grain does not look sharp in that window, because it is too small for the image. The browser uses its internal scaling function to fit the image to the window.

When I move my mouse pointer in that small window, it changes to a magnifier. When I click with this magnifier, it tells my browser not to scale the picture and I get to see the picture in its original resolution. The picture looks noticeably sharper.

Your browser may use a different symbol than the magnifier. Internet Explorer, for example, displays a symbol at the lower right side of the picture.


Thanks, Jerome -

I have Windows Explorer, and what I get when I click on the thumbnail is the enlarged image in a new window, along with a scale system that allows for magnifications/reductions by clicking on the enlargement percentages that run down the right hand side. I have it at 100%.

Alternatively, I can move the pointer over the image and that gives a small + or - symbol that, on clicking, does a small change in magnification.

But there's no visible change in definition beyond the expected degradation on going larger than 100%.

Best -

Rob C
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ACH DIGITAL
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« Reply #722 on: September 21, 2013, 09:38:53 AM »
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Antonio, Real tough but successful results. Like the two.

Thanks Sean. It indeed was tough. Many people involved and many decisions to make, but I love it!
It is part interior photography and part still life.
 
The forum (Recent Professional Works 2) has been moving these days. That is a good sign. Sorry to be away too long.

ACH
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Antonio Chagin
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Chris Barrett
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« Reply #723 on: September 21, 2013, 11:36:12 AM »
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Joe, nice stuff... a quick pointer from my toolbox.  If you can turn off those overhead cove lights, then you can grab an exposure of the windows with no reflection.  It's usually a very quick composite in post and makes things feel a bit nicer.


Sean, thanks!  That's out of the IQ 260 which recently replaced my P65+.


CB
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #724 on: September 21, 2013, 04:00:07 PM »
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Joe, nice stuff... a quick pointer from my toolbox.  If you can turn off those overhead cove lights, then you can grab an exposure of the windows with no reflection.  It's usually a very quick composite in post and makes things feel a bit nicer.


Sean, thanks!  That's out of the IQ 260 which recently replaced my P65+.


CB
Chris, thanks and nice tip; I have done that before.  For this project, the cove lights in the lobby were on the emergency breaker, however maybe I should have done that with the board room image.

Oh well; I'll have to remember this for Tuesday.  Shooting an arboretum, reflection heaven.   Undecided
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Joe Kitchen
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"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
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« Reply #725 on: September 23, 2013, 09:24:30 AM »
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Some more from last week shooting. For all, previous photos and theses ones I used Nikon D800 60mm G Macro, 85mm G 1.8, Pentax 645 120mm Macro with adapter.





ACH
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Antonio Chagin
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #726 on: September 23, 2013, 10:01:35 AM »
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Nice work Antonio. Were you working with a stylist and art director? I require such for work like this even if it is low budget editorial as I have enough to do working out the lighting.
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Kirk Gittings
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Aphoto
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« Reply #727 on: September 23, 2013, 11:22:43 AM »
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Two new city houses in Berlin:





HCAM + Aptus II8 + Zork PSA + Pentax 645 A 35mm
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #728 on: September 23, 2013, 12:41:10 PM »
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Aphoto. Nice clean shots. I generally avoid cars as they date the architecture. Unless the architecture is really trendy it will look contemporary for maybe a decade or even more-but the car will look dated in much less time as car styles change more rapidly.

Twilight shots of those would be really juicy too.
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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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Chris Barrett
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« Reply #729 on: September 23, 2013, 01:03:10 PM »
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the car will look dated in much less time as car styles change more rapidly.


GLK 350?  I kinda want one of those, but what I really need is a cargo van.  Ugh.
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« Reply #730 on: September 23, 2013, 01:45:15 PM »
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Nice work Antonio. Were you working with a stylist and art director? I require such for work like this even if it is low budget editorial as I have enough to do working out the lighting.

Thanks Kirk, yes we had stylist and art director, although the agency art director limits himself to diagrammatic matters.

We are thinking, in the near future to establish ourselves in the United States. I don't know if you guys run things the same way we do here in South America, but provably very similar.

There's too much political intrusion in our lives and it somehow gets on you.

So that's the next move in my career. Thanks God Hopefully!
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Antonio Chagin
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #731 on: September 23, 2013, 01:49:25 PM »
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GLK 350?  I kinda want one of those, but what I really need is a cargo van.  Ugh.

I'm interested to know if you agree "in general" with my point about cars?
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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #732 on: September 23, 2013, 02:08:51 PM »
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Yeah, the last house we shot, we were actually able to get permits to post no parking all in front for a week.
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #733 on: September 23, 2013, 02:33:16 PM »
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Yeah, the last house we shot, we were actually able to get permits to post no parking all in front for a week.

Yes when I shot the new history museum in Santa Fe a couple of years back we got all parking along the street in front of the museum blocked off. Then when we were ready to shoot the assistants would pull all the barricades out of the way and chase cars away trying to park. I then had to Photoshop out all the parking meters and their shadows. All in all a PITA but it sure made for some clean exterior shots.
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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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Harold Clark
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« Reply #734 on: September 23, 2013, 03:14:02 PM »
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I'm interested to know if you agree "in general" with my point about cars?

I agree about cars, except for one of my clients who manages shopping centers. They want lots of cars in the parking lot to make the place look busy, this is a different purpose than most architectural photography though.
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Harold Clark
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« Reply #735 on: September 23, 2013, 03:23:03 PM »
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Here are a couple from a Rec Center shoot:
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #736 on: September 23, 2013, 04:03:31 PM »
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Yes when I shot the new history museum in Santa Fe a couple of years back we got all parking along the street in front of the museum blocked off. Then when we were ready to shoot the assistants would pull all the barricades out of the way and chase cars away trying to park. I then had to Photoshop out all the parking meters and their shadows. All in all a PITA but it sure made for some clean exterior shots.
Interesting.  A lot of firms I have been meeting with and work with in NYC and Center City Philly like the congested look; want to keep it looking natural. 

But, alas, I would prefer the clean look you describe above; he who pays the piper calls the tune I guess. 
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #737 on: September 23, 2013, 04:29:17 PM »
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Quote
A lot of firms I have been meeting with and work with in NYC and Center City Philly like the congested look; want to keep it looking natural. 

Joe,
My theory is get rid of everything possible that distracts from the architecture. Its worked for me for 35 years. FWIW that museum I referred to above in Santa Fe was for SaylorGregg Architects in Philly. You can see a couple of the shots here-one of the street shots is included: http://www.saylorgregg.com/projects/NMHM.htm. Cars, meters etc. would draw your eye and your interest away from the architecture.

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Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #738 on: September 23, 2013, 05:12:13 PM »
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Hi Antonio,

This series of images are lovely. There has definitely been a lot of preparation in making these images and the lighting is beautifully.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #739 on: September 23, 2013, 09:07:06 PM »
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Joe,
My theory is get rid of everything possible that distracts from the architecture. Its worked for me for 35 years. FWIW that museum I referred to above in Santa Fe was for SaylorGregg Architects in Philly. You can see a couple of the shots here-one of the street shots is included: http://www.saylorgregg.com/projects/NMHM.htm. Cars, meters etc. would draw your eye and your interest away from the architecture.



Saylor Gregg, great firm.  I have been trying to get in front of them for a while.  However, for local shoots they are very loyal to Tom Crane, a local Philly photography legend (been in the biz for over 40 years and started off with Ezra Stoller). 

Funny thing is that I really want to travel for projects, like Tim Griffith, and see the world.  But looking at those images you took and knowing that a native South-Westerner captured them, it makes me wonder is someone not native to the Southwest could capture the essence as well as you did.  Kind of makes it a hard sell to convince clients to send you to exotic locations.  I wonder, do I see city architecture differently because I live in Center City Philadelphia and am I better at photographing it? 

Anyway, great job on Sante Fe, Kirk. 
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
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