Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 ... 48 49 [50] 51 52 ... 75 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Re: Recent Professional Works 2  (Read 206158 times)
KLaban
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1671



WWW
« Reply #980 on: December 12, 2013, 02:41:33 PM »
ReplyReply

I'm fond of our lighting.


So am I.

I'm put in mind of the photorealist painters.
Logged

bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1094


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #981 on: December 12, 2013, 04:52:40 PM »
ReplyReply

So am I.

I'm put in mind of the photorealist painters.

Chris,

How many Hopper books do you keep on your bookshelf and that's not a dig.

I know of no living photographer that hasn't tried to search out a hopperesque (is that a word?) diner location.

Just like I know of no living portrait photographer that hasn't put someone in a corner of two set walls sitting on a stool because Irving did it why not?

BC
Logged

MrSmith
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 855



WWW
« Reply #982 on: December 12, 2013, 05:06:25 PM »
ReplyReply

True Rob.

Now, I'd like you to explain me something I never ended to understand about the british car industry:
In G.B it rains all the time init? Why then british cars are so bad in terms of oxydation?
I would have expected GB to be the best in oxyd protection, and they are the worst.



Not the worst. Lancia, Alfa, fiat. There was a class action against lancia as cars were turning to dust at an alarming rate so trading standards stepped in, that finished the brand off in the U.K.
Logged
Phil Indeblanc
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1104


« Reply #983 on: December 12, 2013, 05:44:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
here's a picture of someone's cubicle.  I'm fond of our lighting.

-CB


Very simple clean, Nice!
Logged

If you buy a camera, you're a photographer...
TMARK
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1834


« Reply #984 on: December 13, 2013, 02:18:59 PM »
ReplyReply

Ha ha! 





Just like I know of no living portrait photographer that hasn't put someone in a corner of two set walls sitting on a stool because Irving did it why not?

BC
Logged
bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1094


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #985 on: December 13, 2013, 02:28:44 PM »
ReplyReply

Ha ha! 





I think it's ok that someone does it, though it's kind of lame considering it was Irving's calling card, but I find it really strange that someone does it and thinks they're original and sticks their chest out.

I'd probably respect Penn copies more if someone stomped through the Amazon and shot the natives in a portable studio.  At least I'd give them an A for effort, but two corner walls?

I think I've seen that copied twenty two billion times.

It's the same with Hopper, who no photographer I know has copied well.  They find that corner diner on a wet 4am Sunday morning and shoot and shoot and think they invented it, or shoot straight angles and think that really is "their" style.

It's pretty funny.

BC
Logged

TMARK
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1834


« Reply #986 on: December 13, 2013, 02:38:02 PM »
ReplyReply

A friend did the corner set wall Penn thing recently but he had the subject trying to break out of it, climbing the wall, smashed into it. 

He said he was running out of ideas and then went to the corner, feeling shitty about the Penn-esque nature of it and he wanted to break it all down, so he directed teh subject to do just that.  I'll find a link and post it up.  It actually works.

Now the Hopper thing, well, its a vibe and people take it literally and try to find a diner with that mood, which is a scene that hasn't existed in Manhattan for years.  They even try to find THE diner, which was a composit of places and moods, and light it up with strobes and it looks like shit, or rather, it looks cheap.



I think it's ok that someone does it, though it's kind of lame considering it was Irving's calling card, but I find it really strange that someone does it and thinks they're original and sticks their chest out.

I'd probably respect Penn copies more if someone stomped through the Amazon and shot the natives in a portable studio.  At least I'd give them an A for effort, but two corner walls?

I think I've seen that copied twenty two billion times.

It's the same with Hopper, who no photographer I know has copied well.  They find that corner diner on a wet 4am Sunday morning and shoot and shoot and think they invented it, or shoot straight angles and think that really is "their" style.

It's pretty funny.

BC
Logged
fredjeang2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 791



« Reply #987 on: December 13, 2013, 02:55:07 PM »
ReplyReply

Hopper depresses me.
Logged
bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1094


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #988 on: December 13, 2013, 03:06:54 PM »
ReplyReply

A friend did the corner set wall Penn thing recently but he had the subject trying to break out of it, climbing the wall, smashed into it.  

He said he was running out of ideas and then went to the corner, feeling shitty about the Penn-esque nature of it and he wanted to break it all down, so he directed teh subject to do just that.  I'll find a link and post it up.  It actually works.

Now the Hopper thing, well, its a vibe and people take it literally and try to find a diner with that mood, which is a scene that hasn't existed in Manhattan for years.  They even try to find THE diner, which was a composit of places and moods, and light it up with strobes and it looks like shit, or rather, it looks cheap.




When photographers look at work from the past, they tend to forget that a lot of the "style" is just the period of the time.  Robert Kennedy in Manhattan with a white shirt, small collar and skinny tie and everyone around him is in suits and  white shirts with khaki pants makes for an amazing photography regardless of who shoots it with any camera.

Today if you step out on broadway, everybody is wearing sweats with Jet's logos and orange knee socks which is fine, but doesn't make for a cohesive simple, background.

Alsoi people in America have grown really wide, which isn't that pretty.

We were shooting motion in the London Tube and had a simple shot of the talent walking onto a escalator and riding it down, with me tracking in front.  Talent was great, lighting was good given the budget, but wrangling civilians was impossible, due to permits and it's almost impossible to find a cut where someone doesn't have a sweatshirt on that says I heart something, but even if you have total control sometimes crazy s--t happens.

The best story I have is when I started this biz I was hired to shoot the advertising and a book for a movie.  It was a 4 month project.   Getting to the end the production was way over budget and time and we needed a sunny day on a restaurant patio and of course it was a trillion degrees below zero.

Everything was going wrong and it was a big scene where the murder scene happens.  

We'd shoot, get close, someone would knock over a light, the director would yell keep rolling and of course we'd run out of film.
This went on and on for hours until at one moment, one very special moment, everything was going perfect.  You could feel it and I just knew in thirty minutes I'd be out of there doing something a lot more fun.

The moment the lead actor pulls out the prop gun, points it and is ready to shoot, one of the extras, right in the left center of the camera view pulls out a point and shoot with a flash and fires it.

The director (who was brilliant but insane) goes postal.  He leaps over the table, slides across it, grabs the extra by the throat, tumbles to the floor and is choking him to death.  Seriously.

Being camera and being at the end of what felt like a tour of occupied Germany,  we really had no respect for anything, so when security tried to jump in to stop the real murder, we kept yelling leave them alone, we've bet serious money on this.  

BC
« Last Edit: December 13, 2013, 03:11:12 PM by bcooter » Logged

TMARK
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1834


« Reply #989 on: December 13, 2013, 08:48:41 PM »
ReplyReply

Violence at the end of an ordeal like that can be very gratifying.  Sounds like a wild ride.

You'll like this.  Bridgeport Connecticut.  They want films shot there.  They offer incentives, discounts on police, easy permiting, tax breaks etc.  Its an interesting looking place as well, lots of 30's and 40's facades, lots of deco.  Reflects the money the place had before it went rust belt, before the ships stopped coming to the port.

So my ex-partner, who is from Fairfield, is all hot on shooting in Bridgeport.  I'm not convinced.  The local film/tv commission are out of it, and teh cops are not enthused.  So we agree to shoot a music video as a test case.  Its 17F outside.  We had a few streets blocked off.  We had a hot rod and driver, pulling brodies and burning rubber.  We had a fight and a shoot out with squibs.  It was a difficult shoot, made harder by:  1. a drunk woman in a Lexis runs up a curb, knocks over an Ari Sun.  She gets out, in our shot, mind you, and bottles fall out of her car.  She vomits.  Its 8:00AM.  2. The local drug dealer saunters over and offers us coke.  The cop chases him off and tells us about the guy and how he killed two people.  Its 10:00AM, really behind schedule.  At 1:30PM said drug dealer was stabbed.  Cops come in force, we were shut down for the day.  The next day we shot exteriors, no sound, natural light, just the Red on a steady cam, got out of there ASAP.  I'm glad our first try in Bridgeport was a pro bono video.  A paying client would have been pissed.


When photographers look at work from the past, they tend to forget that a lot of the "style" is just the period of the time.  Robert Kennedy in Manhattan with a white shirt, small collar and skinny tie and everyone around him is in suits and  white shirts with khaki pants makes for an amazing photography regardless of who shoots it with any camera.

Today if you step out on broadway, everybody is wearing sweats with Jet's logos and orange knee socks which is fine, but doesn't make for a cohesive simple, background.

Alsoi people in America have grown really wide, which isn't that pretty.

We were shooting motion in the London Tube and had a simple shot of the talent walking onto a escalator and riding it down, with me tracking in front.  Talent was great, lighting was good given the budget, but wrangling civilians was impossible, due to permits and it's almost impossible to find a cut where someone doesn't have a sweatshirt on that says I heart something, but even if you have total control sometimes crazy s--t happens.

The best story I have is when I started this biz I was hired to shoot the advertising and a book for a movie.  It was a 4 month project.   Getting to the end the production was way over budget and time and we needed a sunny day on a restaurant patio and of course it was a trillion degrees below zero.

Everything was going wrong and it was a big scene where the murder scene happens.  

We'd shoot, get close, someone would knock over a light, the director would yell keep rolling and of course we'd run out of film.
This went on and on for hours until at one moment, one very special moment, everything was going perfect.  You could feel it and I just knew in thirty minutes I'd be out of there doing something a lot more fun.

The moment the lead actor pulls out the prop gun, points it and is ready to shoot, one of the extras, right in the left center of the camera view pulls out a point and shoot with a flash and fires it.

The director (who was brilliant but insane) goes postal.  He leaps over the table, slides across it, grabs the extra by the throat, tumbles to the floor and is choking him to death.  Seriously.

Being camera and being at the end of what felt like a tour of occupied Germany,  we really had no respect for anything, so when security tried to jump in to stop the real murder, we kept yelling leave them alone, we've bet serious money on this.  

BC

Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #990 on: December 14, 2013, 03:11:30 AM »
ReplyReply

A friend did the corner set wall Penn thing recently but he had the subject trying to break out of it, climbing the wall, smashed into it. 

He said he was running out of ideas and then went to the corner, feeling shitty about the Penn-esque nature of it and he wanted to break it all down, so he directed teh subject to do just that.  I'll find a link and post it up.  It actually works.

Now the Hopper thing, well, its a vibe and people take it literally and try to find a diner with that mood, which is a scene that hasn't existed in Manhattan for years.  They even try to find THE diner, which was a composit of places and moods, and light it up with strobes and it looks like shit, or rather, it looks cheap.




Isn't that supposed to be the spirit of the concept of 'diner'?

Rob C
Logged

Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #991 on: December 14, 2013, 03:18:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Hopper depresses me.


But isn't he wanting to? That's what happens when there's no tit 'n' ass in your life! I used to be a very happy photographer.

Rob C
Logged

bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1094


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #992 on: December 14, 2013, 03:28:40 AM »
ReplyReply


But isn't he wanting to? That's what happens when there's no tit 'n' ass in your life! I used to be a very happy photographer.

Rob C

Well, you know he answer to that.

Break open the wallet Rob.

BC
Logged

bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1094


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #993 on: December 14, 2013, 03:40:03 AM »
ReplyReply

T

That's the problem with small markets.  The don't know s__t or how to spin it professionally.

When we bought the Dallas studio, we did a lot of work there (not local as I don't do much local anywhere) but anyway made use of it.   Most of my crew came in from NY a few from LA and a few local pick ups.

The locals wanted more money than the NY crews, (of course), so one night one of the third assistants we called Mr. cheese (you can guess why) wouldn't leave so we invited him to dinner.

He ate the most expensive entree on the menu (though I really didn't care) parked in valet and didn't have any cash(at this point I'm starting to care)  and then a week later I get an invoice where he bills me overtime for the dinner.

When I got the invoice I laughed and had to give him a call.  I said you know, I've seem so stupid stuff in my life and I'm not cheap, but what possessed you to bill me for eating dinner,especially charing overtime?

His reply "I thought that's the way you new york guys work".

My reply, you need to intern for Seleger, Klinko or T-bone, then get back to me.

BC
« Last Edit: December 14, 2013, 04:44:21 AM by bcooter » Logged

MrSmith
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 855



WWW
« Reply #994 on: December 14, 2013, 04:50:36 AM »
ReplyReply

Lol. Assistants always order the lobster but then billing you for the time to eat it??
I know an assistant (now photographer) who was given 4 by the photographer "to get me a sandwich".
 "What about lunch for me? "
"Oh you can get your own"
He handed the money back and said "see you in an hour, I'm off for my lunch".
 I learned quickly to never take any crap from photographers when assisting and just worked with ones who you could have a laugh with but also happy to pull out the stops for because they paid you well and appreciated your efforts.
Apart from the time a photographer I had never worked with before suddenly put his jacket on to leave and told me to finish the shoot and put the studio key back through the door... Huh I was just left with a load of product, film and Polaroid and a late evening. I didn't work for him again.
Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #995 on: December 14, 2013, 05:46:58 AM »
ReplyReply

Well, you know he answer to that.

Break open the wallet Rob.
BC


It wouldn't work BC; even when I did stock I couldn't make it work if I shot for myself - there simply had to be a client to provide both the money and the motivation. On the very rare occasion when I paid for the shoot myself, I was worried about everything; when it was on a client, I mostly enjoyed it and brought back what he wanted and then I used the extras (with permission) for stock.

I'm not sure why - maybe a deep insecurity about money, maybe just that I needed the affirmation that an assignment brought with it.

The exception to that rule was in my early photographic life, when I had a muse/model who was as into and informed about fashion photography and photographers of the day as was I. We often went off together for a day and just shot whatever she picked up from the boutiques, which being from a very notable Glasgow family, she was easily able to do. There was no money involved in those shoots, just the happiness of a mutual learning process and no sex, honestly, just an slight undercurrent that kept it all alive and fresh. I suppose, in a way, she was my local Penelope Tree or Marisa Berenson to my David Bailey, because at the time, even he needed the money and the ladies didn't.

I suppose muses are thin on the ground today. As are David Baileys.

A shot from the period, below, and with Twiggy eyelashes...

Rob C
« Last Edit: December 14, 2013, 08:04:31 AM by Rob C » Logged

Chris Barrett
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 230


« Reply #996 on: December 14, 2013, 06:19:03 AM »
ReplyReply

Cewdson, Freidlander, Gowin, Sugimoto, Abelardo Morell.... but no Hopper on the shelves.
Logged
KLaban
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1671



WWW
« Reply #997 on: December 14, 2013, 07:03:53 AM »
ReplyReply

Hopper's light tended to be harsh and directional, quite unlike the 'cubicle' shot.
Logged

TMARK
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1834


« Reply #998 on: December 14, 2013, 03:31:42 PM »
ReplyReply

T-Bone would not have handled that situation well, at all, especially in the old days.  Things could get ugly very quickly back then, in the Mars Bar days.



T

That's the problem with small markets.  The don't know s__t or how to spin it professionally.

When we bought the Dallas studio, we did a lot of work there (not local as I don't do much local anywhere) but anyway made use of it.   Most of my crew came in from NY a few from LA and a few local pick ups.

The locals wanted more money than the NY crews, (of course), so one night one of the third assistants we called Mr. cheese (you can guess why) wouldn't leave so we invited him to dinner.

He ate the most expensive entree on the menu (though I really didn't care) parked in valet and didn't have any cash(at this point I'm starting to care)  and then a week later I get an invoice where he bills me overtime for the dinner.

When I got the invoice I laughed and had to give him a call.  I said you know, I've seem so stupid stuff in my life and I'm not cheap, but what possessed you to bill me for eating dinner,especially charing overtime?

His reply "I thought that's the way you new york guys work".

My reply, you need to intern for Seleger, Klinko or T-bone, then get back to me.

BC
Logged
TMARK
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1834


« Reply #999 on: December 14, 2013, 03:32:20 PM »
ReplyReply

GREAT SHOT ROB!!



It wouldn't work BC; even when I did stock I couldn't make it work if I shot for myself - there simply had to be a client to provide both the money and the motivation. On the very rare occasion when I paid for the shoot myself, I was worried about everything; when it was on a client, I mostly enjoyed it and brought back what he wanted and then I used the extras (with permission) for stock.

I'm not sure why - maybe a deep insecurity about money, maybe just that I needed the affirmation that an assignment brought with it.

The exception to that rule was in my early photographic life, when I had a muse/model who was as into and informed about fashion photography and photographers of the day as was I. We often went off together for a day and just shot whatever she picked up from the boutiques, which being from a very notable Glasgow family, she was easily able to do. There was no money involved in those shoots, just the happiness of a mutual learning process and no sex, honestly, just an slight undercurrent that kept it all alive and fresh. I suppose, in a way, she was my local Penelope Tree or Marisa Berenson to my David Bailey, because at the time, even he needed the money and the ladies didn't.

I suppose muses are thin on the ground today. As are David Baileys.

A shot from the period, below, and with Twiggy eyelashes...

Rob C
Logged
Pages: « 1 ... 48 49 [50] 51 52 ... 75 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad