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Author Topic: Re: Recent Professional Works 2  (Read 189796 times)
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #120 on: March 15, 2013, 01:39:42 PM »
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Fair enough.

I was speaking more from a perspective of an end-user (of the magazine or catalogue). My first thought seeing it was not "socio-ecologic," but simple common sense: why is the lamp on with so much sunlight and overall brightness? Yes, lamps looks better lit than not, but in situations where our brains expect them to be lit.
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SecondFocus
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« Reply #121 on: March 15, 2013, 08:39:22 PM »
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I just opened up the latest edition of PDN to find our friend James Haefner featured about his top-secret photo shoot of the latest Corvette. The photo of the Corvette in it's car carrier is just incredible and creative and so very much shows his very enviable talent and professionalism!

Very Cool!
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Ian L. Sitren
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Chris Livsey
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« Reply #122 on: March 16, 2013, 03:41:39 AM »
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So much to love here. Brief, big tick. Lighting, brilliant, crop/frame as always, inch perfect. Especially love that typewriter, quirky but not intrusive, great colour and placement. Even the pencil stack leaning the "right" way.
Just the tiny point that I find the lamp (Oh NO! not the lamp Wink ) reflection, which I know should be there and would be difficult? to remove just not looking right. I know, I feel so bad picking but a would be interested in your thought.
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Chris Livsey
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« Reply #123 on: March 16, 2013, 09:24:06 AM »
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The reflection doesn't bother me at all, putting carbon footprint thoughts aside.  Bravo for client who doesn't want to suck the life out of a photo by turning it into an some kind of illustration. 

But, Chris paying more attention to the light made me appreciate what you did here.  Very deft handling of the combination of warmth and and cool color balance.  I have found trying to do any retouching with gradations like that, even on a bare wall, can be really tricky.  Is all this on one file?

Getting back to the light, do you interior photographers ever use a light in a frame that is not turned on?  Even when "daylight" dominates the photo?  I can't imagine the photo working as with the light turned off.  The warm tone balances nicely with the red on the chair seat.  My first thought would be, if is a problem, take it out of the frame.  I would be curious, Chirs, what discussions on this you had with stylists, or in your head, when you were setting up the photo.

Nice work, enjoyed looking at the rest of the set.  Need to buy myself a new chair.  Problem is, the rest of my workspace doesn't look like this.  But that is a discussion for a different forum.

Best, John
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ACH DIGITAL
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« Reply #124 on: March 16, 2013, 11:21:16 AM »
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Chris, nice set of photos.
The discussion is pretty interesting and I guess there was a great team behind working on styling and others.
The lamp is in my point of view, an element included to add warmth to an otherwise cool image. See that there are lots of white and mainly daylight.
Also the warm lamp counter balances the red chair.
For that lamp to be as bright as it is, I can guess there is a strong wattage bulb inside.
Again, millimetric composition on all images. I really like number 1 in the blog.

ACH
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Antonio Chagin
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Yelhsa
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« Reply #125 on: March 16, 2013, 11:28:47 AM »
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Getting back to the light, do you interior photographers ever use a light in a frame that is not turned on?  
Yes.
You can see lots of example here: Interiors.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 10:04:40 AM by Yelhsa » Logged

FredBGG
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« Reply #126 on: March 16, 2013, 12:04:49 PM »
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Dude.  I think that's a little silly.  Lamps look better lit.  We're making photographs not socio-ecologic edicts. If we thought it was really a valid issue I would have removed the lamp and used a different prop rather than have it off.

Actually I think the lamp itself would have looked nice off. With it on it's texture is lost. You can see more of it's geometry in the reflection in the window.

Also form what I have seen there is a trend that is liked by leading Architects that is more about how the environment looks in reality.
An architects true skills show through how he or she uses the environment as it is in reality and as it will be in use.
I also find that too much order does not reflect reality... well unless it's Adrian Monks house.

But all of this is subjective, without doubt it's well executed work.
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FredBGG
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« Reply #127 on: March 16, 2013, 12:16:47 PM »
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Yes.
You can see lots of example here: Interiors.

These are really really good. They have a very good balance between tidiness and a credible homely livable in feel. Natural light when used right is
just so nice. Also these images are true to what one would see visiting the houses. This is a very important point. If you are selling something
you want the enthusiasm of the buyer or viewer to mount during the process. It is totally counter productive to show something better than it is
in photos and then when you are there in reality it looks less appealing or whatever.

This is also for example many fashion designers don't really show too much of the cloths in their ads. For example the Guess campaign is one of the best out there.
They show style and emotion and just build and build on the iconic aspect of the brand.



This leaves the boutique staff something to do with the client... more to discover, try on all sorts of things, let the boutique staff
choose what works. It's all about and upward path in the whole fun and games of shopping fashion at the higher level.
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ACH DIGITAL
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« Reply #128 on: March 16, 2013, 04:04:58 PM »
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Provably ambiguity have a to do with everything we do in live, nothing is just one way.
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Antonio Chagin
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LKaven
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« Reply #129 on: March 17, 2013, 03:47:23 AM »
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Yes.
You can see lots of example here: Interiors.

Ashley, are you working with strobes outside the window in this one?  If so, you did it very seamlessly, as in your other work.  I've long suspected that your mastery of creating window light involves quite a clever bag of tricks.  Not to say that you don't have a number of lower-powered instruments working for you on the inside as well.  High finesse all around.
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Yelhsa
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« Reply #130 on: March 17, 2013, 06:27:03 AM »
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Ashley, are you working with strobes outside the window in this one?  
Putting a large light outside the window will definitely help add to the main direction of light - as well as add a sparkle sometimes, to any area of the room you want to highlight.
So (as many of you will already know) light can be used to help create depth, as well as to help draw the viewer's eye through the image, to what you want them to look at.

No real rights or wrongs when it comes to lighting - it usually just a personal taste thing - however, the masters of light (i.m.h.o.) are those who work in the Movie business - where they have to the budgets to play with, to achieve some truly amazing results.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 10:00:37 AM by Yelhsa » Logged

Chris Barrett
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« Reply #131 on: March 17, 2013, 09:26:41 AM »
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back to my shot above....
@ Chris, yeah I don't love the lamp reflection either.  The easy way to handle that is to take an exposure with it off and drop in that window.
@ John, I set the distance of the lamp from the walls to get just the level of light and falloff from it that I desired (while keeping it centered between the storage). This would have been one file except the rug was barely wide enough to fit the chair on.  After exposing the main shot, we removed the desk and chair, I slid the rug to the left and exposed that to composite and "widen" the rug later.  And... at home, my chairs are way nicer than the rest of my office.


- however, the masters of light (i.m.h.o.) are those who work in the Movie business - where they have to budgets to play with, to achieve some truly amazing results.


Ditto, Man.  The more narrative films I shoot (and we're small productions with 15-20 man crews) the more I realize that most still photographers know barely anything at all about lighting... and I include myself in that.

Not to mention how fun films are... just look how much we're all smiling!  LoL

« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 09:32:59 AM by Chris Barrett » Logged
Chris Livsey
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« Reply #132 on: March 17, 2013, 12:56:42 PM »
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back to my shot above....
@ Chris, yeah I don't love the lamp reflection either.  The easy way to handle that is to take an exposure with it off and drop in that window.

Duhh!! Of course, you can tell that's not my area of expertise, if indeed I have any area.

Looked back at the rug, easy when you know how, they should buy a new one that size.
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Chris Livsey
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #133 on: March 17, 2013, 04:07:19 PM »
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back to my shot above....
@ Chris, yeah I don't love the lamp reflection either.  The easy way to handle that is to take an exposure with it off and drop in that window.
@ John, I set the distance of the lamp from the walls to get just the level of light and falloff from it that I desired (while keeping it centered between the storage). This would have been one file except the rug was barely wide enough to fit the chair on.  After exposing the main shot, we removed the desk and chair, I slid the rug to the left and exposed that to composite and "widen" the rug later.  And... at home, my chairs are way nicer than the rest of my office.



Ditto, Man.  The more narrative films I shoot (and we're small productions with 15-20 man crews) the more I realize that most still photographers know barely anything at all about lighting... and I include myself in that.

Not to mention how fun films are... just look how much we're all smiling!  LoL


Funny, I was talking to photo consultant who began his career as a gaffer in Hollywood.  After doing that for a while, he began assisting; first shoot was an architectural shoot.  He said he showed up, look at the lighting equipment they were going to use and said "is this it?"

LOL
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Joe Kitchen
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« Reply #134 on: March 17, 2013, 05:44:07 PM »
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I wouldn't say one is better than the other (film/stills) from talking with dp's they certainly don't look down on stills photographers who know how to light, and we can learn from each other.
Not every photographer is a good crafter of light and you see plenty of adverts on tv with big budgets lit with a sledgehammer.
Once the technical details are sorted somebody who understands lighting could light a room or a portrait whatever their background.

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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #135 on: March 17, 2013, 07:53:29 PM »
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I just opened up the latest edition of PDN to find our friend James Haefner featured about his top-secret photo shoot of the latest Corvette. The photo of the Corvette in it's car carrier is just incredible and creative and so very much shows his very enviable talent and professionalism!

Very Cool!

Ian, Thanks for the compliments!!  I was thrilled about PDN's interest in running a story about the shoot.  Here's a link to some of the other shots taken that day.  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=28709.4200  Jim
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SecondFocus
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« Reply #136 on: March 17, 2013, 08:26:42 PM »
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Tell me you got to keep the car as a bonus for job well done Smiley

Just kidding... I never get to keep the girls I shoot either.

Ian, Thanks for the compliments!!  I was thrilled about PDN's interest in running a story about the shoot.  Here's a link to some of the other shots taken that day.  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=28709.4200  Jim
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Ian L. Sitren
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« Reply #137 on: March 17, 2013, 08:45:03 PM »
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I wouldn't say one is better than the other (film/stills) from talking with dp's they certainly don't look down on stills photographers who know how to light, and we can learn from each other.
Not every photographer is a good crafter of light and you see plenty of adverts on tv with big budgets lit with a sledgehammer.
Once the technical details are sorted somebody who understands lighting could light a room or a portrait whatever their background.



You should see the brief from an agency on lighting and mood for those sledgehammer lit ads. My favorite quote describing a desired light quality is "directional, shadowless, bright". Yeah, what they mean is "rent every Arri sun you can find and turn them all on at once, with no scrims or gobos". Its flat and bright. TV commercials are he'll, but it's a dry heat.
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jsch
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« Reply #138 on: March 18, 2013, 02:59:26 AM »
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Funny, I was talking to photo consultant who began his career as a gaffer in Hollywood.  After doing that for a while, he began assisting; first shoot was an architectural shoot.  He said he showed up, look at the lighting equipment they were going to use and said "is this it?"

LOL

If I remember it right: At a 1/50 of a second a 3200 Ws flash is worth 150 kW tungsten continuous. So small gun but big bang. Or as they say in this famous western: "If a man with a gun meets a man with a rifle ..." So if you spent one dollar more for the light, you don't have a guarantee to get the better image. Usually the better man wins, not the one with the better equipment.
For good skin tones tungsten is not bad, because the near IR in tungsten helps to render skin tone better [source: ARRI].

Only the best illumination,
Johannes
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fredjeang2
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« Reply #139 on: March 18, 2013, 09:53:55 AM »
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It's amazing how small the Red is compared to what it's capable to. I'll never get used to it. It's 1/3 of the Alexa's body. Even rigged it still is tiny.

Man, the engineers at Red are genuises.

For good skin tones tungsten is not bad, because the near IR in tungsten helps to render skin tone better [source: ARRI].
I do think so too.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 09:57:21 AM by fredjeang2 » Logged
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