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Author Topic: Re: Recent Professional Works 2  (Read 228201 times)
slackercruster
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« Reply #780 on: October 03, 2013, 07:16:14 AM »
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Recent personal / portfolio series. The first one is coming out in Workbook in the next week or two. It's a single capture, H3DII-39, HC 50mm lens.

The shoot was a ton of fun, but it's also hell shooting that close to the tide. Sand gets in everything. The water occasionally comes much higher than you expect, potentially drenching gear. Whether the tide is rising or receding, you're constantly moving the talent and lights with it.


Nice work, very creative.
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slackercruster
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« Reply #781 on: October 03, 2013, 07:20:41 AM »
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Naw.  Dallas, regardless of perception would much rather be picked up and moved to the east cost.   Dallas is corporate money, Bentleys and Armani, the 25 year olds eat fusion and are foodies, well most of them.

There's still some Texas left in the area, if you go to Ft. Worth, but most of that is for tourists that still think we all ride horse and shoot on sight.

The name of this bar sounds politically incorrect, but for a long, long time Dallas lived under the stigma of that awful day and I think just grew tired of it

I've never heard a Dallasite mention it, but the national and international news mentions that time as if it were yesterday.

Anyway, the patrons of this bar just wanna have fun, sit out in the gravel lot, listen to music, get a little loaded, go home with a boy/girl and not worry about life.

To them the name Lee Harvey has about as much impact as saying John Wilkes Booth.  Both tragic, both way in the past.

But no you won't get shot with a gun.  There is more guns per capita in LA than Dallas, though perception and reality are way different animals.

Actually the most liberal county in American is the most caucasian centric, Marin County, North of San Francisco.  Dallas proper has more percentage of ethnic's groups than most American Cities, so  . . .

Once again, perception and reality.



Love this shot, love this model.  Kathryn is not anorexic, or afraid to eat a meal, she's just a good hard working damn pretty woman.

Not Retouched.

IMO

BC

Beautiful, natural look. I enjoyed all your shots.
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slackercruster
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« Reply #782 on: October 03, 2013, 07:22:01 AM »
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Two of my favorite.

Same talent, left during makeup, right after.

Left, a trillion iso, right much less.

Both p30+, contax



BC

OK, not an anorexic, but she is pretty thin...nice work!
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slackercruster
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« Reply #783 on: October 03, 2013, 07:23:11 AM »
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Hello,

This is a personal shot I did working with a great retoucher and all round nice guy Dan Coroian-Vlad.

http://www.retouching.co.nz/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/D2-creative-retouching/166300943405238

The car was shot with a Nikon D800E, Nikon 70-200mm F2.8G @F16.0.

Lighting was Dedos my new home made strip light and some light painting.

I have another shot of the Aston Martin DBS coming soon.

Cheers

Simon

Very nice. Reminds me of that guy that does all the sports shots.
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slackercruster
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« Reply #784 on: October 03, 2013, 07:25:18 AM »
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Skylabs, Heidelberg, Germany:











I'm not too much for architecture. But you put out some nice clean work...beautiful!
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MrSmith
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« Reply #785 on: October 03, 2013, 07:48:18 AM »
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a chemex coffee brewer for a mag cover all about coffee



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MichaelEzra
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« Reply #786 on: October 03, 2013, 10:12:23 AM »
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Beautiful work.

She has a wonderful symmetrical body. I love the 3 ribs! One of the best studies in gray tones I've seen.

Why did it take so long to bring to light?

Thanks. Simply not enough time to process images. I still have many from even 2002.
A lot of retouching time is spent on the background behind the model. Paper is never as smooth as I like it to be.
Even a fresh roll of paper quickly develops some bumps on the surface. I suppose due to humidity, although it is very dry in my studio.
I was thinking of trying vinul, not sure if it is as matte as the paper, but even then it would get quickly stretched under the model's weight... well unless she is levitating:)
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BobDavid
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« Reply #787 on: October 03, 2013, 10:50:59 AM »
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Thanks. Simply not enough time to process images. I still have many from even 2002.
A lot of retouching time is spent on the background behind the model. Paper is never as smooth as I like it to be.
Even a fresh roll of paper quickly develops some bumps on the surface. I suppose due to humidity, although it is very dry in my studio.
I was thinking of trying vinul, not sure if it is as matte as the paper, but even then it would get quickly stretched under the model's weight... well unless she is levitating:)

I appreciate the effort it takes to render a smooth bkg. when working with seamless. I've found that increasing the distance of the subject in relationship to the background helps. But of course, I've only got about 20 feet lengthwise, so that severely limits what I am able to shoot. I'm fanatical about smooth bkgs. for my doggie portraits http://www.topdogimaging.net/dog-photos.html. I am stunned by how much the price of seamless has gone up over the past few years. Nothing turns me off more than seeing ripply backgrounds.

By the way, I love the image. You really have an incredible knack for taking interesting minimalist photos. I know how much perfection it takes to pull it off.

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BobDavid
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« Reply #788 on: October 03, 2013, 10:56:44 AM »
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In re Russel and Rutherford's picture: Not to be a fuddy duddy, Michael Ezra's photos truly enter the realm of fine art. To me, this picture of the sultry woman looks well ... slutty. I've seen this type of picture ten million times in one form or another. The execution is fine. ... Not to be harsh, but I just don't get it, and I'm not trying to be mean-spirited.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 11:01:50 AM by BobDavid » Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #789 on: October 03, 2013, 11:23:57 AM »
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Thanks. Simply not enough time to process images. I still have many from even 2002.
A lot of retouching time is spent on the background behind the model. Paper is never as smooth as I like it to be.
Even a fresh roll of paper quickly develops some bumps on the surface. I suppose due to humidity, although it is very dry in my studio.
I was thinking of trying vinul, not sure if it is as matte as the paper, but even then it would get quickly stretched under the model's weight... well unless she is levitating:)
Now I understand why your models are usually levitating!  Grin

This one, like the levitaters, is stunning. And they are truly fine art, as BobDavid says.
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KLaban
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« Reply #790 on: October 03, 2013, 11:51:34 AM »
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In re Russel and Rutherford's picture: Not to be a fuddy duddy, Michael Ezra's photos truly enter the realm of fine art. To me, this picture of the sultry woman looks well ... slutty. I've seen this type of picture ten million times in one form or another. The execution is fine. ... Not to be harsh, but I just don't get it, and I'm not trying to be mean-spirited.

Hmm, let me think, Cooter’s earthy, colourful women or clinical, grey mannequins? ...Not to be harsh, but I just don't get it, and I'm not trying to be mean-spirited.
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BobDavid
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« Reply #791 on: October 03, 2013, 05:18:09 PM »
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Hmm, let me think, Cooter’s earthy, colourful women or clinical, grey mannequins? ...Not to be harsh, but I just don't get it, and I'm not trying to be mean-spirited.


Have you ever tried to photograph a model in a minimalist setting? If you study Ezra's work, it's clear to see that he has the eye of a sculptor along with total mastery of the aesthetic and the technical aspects of making a timeless image. Perhaps the difference between the "grey mannequins" and "colorful women" is akin to the difference between great literature and pulp fiction. Ezra has a consistent vision and his execution is exquisite. I've been looking at his nude studies for years. More often than not they are masterpieces that I think are as compelling as Rodin's sculptures. I like the fact that he uses an obsolete entry-level  Mamiya/22MP camera.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 05:22:37 PM by BobDavid » Logged
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #792 on: October 03, 2013, 06:36:33 PM »
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Have you ever tried to photograph a model in a minimalist setting? If you study Ezra's work, it's clear to see that he has the eye of a sculptor along with total mastery of the aesthetic and the technical aspects of making a timeless image. Perhaps the difference between the "grey mannequins" and "colorful women" is akin to the difference between great literature and pulp fiction. Ezra has a consistent vision and his execution is exquisite. I've been looking at his nude studies for years. More often than not they are masterpieces that I think are as compelling as Rodin's sculptures. I like the fact that he uses an obsolete entry-level  Mamiya/22MP camera.
Exactly! Well said, Bob.
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Jeffery Salter
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« Reply #793 on: October 03, 2013, 08:06:17 PM »
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Art is in the eye of the beholder.  Sometimes it's easy to mix up an artfully done photograph with *fine art*.  I guess we all have our own definitions of what is fine art.  

Why compare?  Cooter's contemporary classics are rooted in a sense of place and mood, with eye to making a statement about the "now".  Looking at his images it's easy to connect and understand him as a visual artist.
Ezra's images are past views of Greek Classic nudes.  Well done and beautifully toned.  It's difficult for me to really connect with his wonderful images because I don't understand what he's trying to say, however that's doesn't diminish any visual pleasure I may derive from the work.

No need to rehash the f/64 group's manifesto. Comparing pictorialists to modernists.  Let's continue to learn and enjoy the vision of the artists who freely choose to share their images with us.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 08:08:16 PM by Jeffery Salter » Logged

Jeffery Salter
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jeremydillon
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« Reply #794 on: October 03, 2013, 11:07:33 PM »
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Thanks. Simply not enough time to process images. I still have many from even 2002.
A lot of retouching time is spent on the background behind the model. Paper is never as smooth as I like it to be.
Even a fresh roll of paper quickly develops some bumps on the surface. I suppose due to humidity, although it is very dry in my studio.
I was thinking of trying vinul, not sure if it is as matte as the paper, but even then it would get quickly stretched under the model's weight... well unless she is levitating:)

Hi Michael,
Do you store your paper on the wall or off?  I tend to get 'dimples' if I keep my background paper up on the wall. I think it sags slightly in the middle and when it unrolls the dimples appear. Rolls which I store off the wall, rolled up in their boxes standing vertically don't seem to have this problem.
Cheers
Jeremy
« Last Edit: October 03, 2013, 11:09:06 PM by jeremydillon » Logged
BobDavid
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« Reply #795 on: October 03, 2013, 11:29:00 PM »
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Greek sculpture has fascinated artists, historians, and regular folks for millinia. I think Ezra's work certainly exhibits a classical aesthetic. But, I've yet to encounter a Greek sculpture able to capture the female form as Ezra does. His models are real. The synergy between all of the elements--artist, model, space, and moment in time fit together in a manner that is truly sublime,rare. My guess is that he has spent years cultivating his skill. And his images are mysterious. His models have obviously been on a journey exploring the limits of body and mind. There is a certain contemplative/mediative aspect of his work that satisfies.

The picture of the girl in the bar is not a bad picture, nor is it a great one. It is not mysterious or subtle. It's a one-liner. And it's common. I see a lot of work like that in portfolios from enthusiast photographers that are workshop junkies. Michael's work is not like that. I cannot even imagine how beautiful one of his images would look as an artisan print. I see silver, not grey.
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epines
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« Reply #796 on: October 03, 2013, 11:34:00 PM »
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a chemex coffee brewer for a mag cover all about coffee

No one's mentioned it yet, so I will -- this shot is gorgeously done. Nice composition, lighting and retouching. Great work.
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MrSmith
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« Reply #797 on: October 04, 2013, 02:35:37 AM »
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Thanks. The blue and wood is a bit more subtle that that, save for web>sRGB>browser seems to have given it some punch that wasn't there in the original.
Client was happy which is the important thing. Grin

(Edit: must be settings in Safari, the colour tone is fine on iPad, new retina MBP so I need to make safari profile aware)
« Last Edit: October 04, 2013, 02:38:18 AM by MrSmith » Logged
KLaban
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« Reply #798 on: October 04, 2013, 04:00:36 AM »
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I think Ezra's work certainly exhibits a classical aesthetic. But, I've yet to encounter a Greek sculpture able to capture the female form as Ezra does.

Gosh!

Having spent a great deal of time during my formative years as an art student viewing the classical Greek statuary I still see it as a celebration of life and the personification of human sexuality and form.

Conversely…

Thankfully it is the differences between us that make for an interesting life.
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Aphoto
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« Reply #799 on: October 04, 2013, 02:19:19 PM »
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I'm not too much for architecture. But you put out some nice clean work...beautiful!

Thank you  Smiley

I've got some more:









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