Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Icebergs, eastern coast of Canada  (Read 815 times)
marvpelkey
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


« on: March 01, 2013, 09:17:33 PM »
ReplyReply

I am contemplating a trip to the east coast of Canada, specifically Iceberg Alley. My question is, does one have to use a boat to really get good photos or can they be captured properly from land with a medium (70-200 zoom) length lens? And I understand the best time of year is June-ish?

Thanks,

Marv
Logged
churly
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 523


« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2013, 09:53:51 AM »
ReplyReply

Marv - A good place to look for information on icebergs viewing along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador is www.icebergfinder.com.  Yes, June is likely best.  I would say the latter part of June to early July.  Whether or not you need a boat depends on which way the wind has been blowing but there are a lot of tour boat operators along the northeast coast.  Grounded icebergs are often accessible from shore.  Come prepared for the weather.  It could be just about anything but it there will be a chill in the air particularly if the sea ice is in close to the coast.  You will want to be mobile so if you are renting a car you need to get a reservation pretty early as there is often a shortage in the summer.

Chuck
Logged

Chuck Hurich
marvpelkey
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2013, 09:37:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Chuck,

Thanks for the info and link. Some comments in the link and yours about renting a vehicle cause me to wonder if iceberg time in that area is similar to the leaves turning in Vermont et al, where the visitor population increases drastically. Although I haven't decided between driving my truck and travel trailer from BC or flying, I wonder if accommodations will be in short demand as well.

Marv
Logged
churly
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 523


« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2013, 02:41:59 PM »
ReplyReply

Marv, I wouldn't worry about accommodations at that time of year.  If there are any issues at all it would be in St. John's due to conventions.  The thing about iceberg chasing is that you have to be mobile enough to go where they are.  If you are interested in birds, the Witless Bay reserve is good for puffins but you have to be on a tour boat.  When the capelin are in, Witless Bay is a great place for humpbacks and the occasional grey whale.  The Cape St. Mary's reserve is outstanding for gannets and kittiwakes and is completely accessible on foot.  You just need to get a clearish day or you will be in the famous Newfoundland fog.  They are both on the Avalon peninsula.

Chuck  
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 04:46:57 PM by churly » Logged

Chuck Hurich
marvpelkey
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2013, 09:20:08 PM »
ReplyReply

Chuck,

Thanks for the follow-up info. I don't plan on spending much time in St Johns so that is no issue. Good to know about the birds. As to fog, that is my favourite environment in which to shoot so I would consider it a bonus rather than an impediment (as long as I can get some views to the bergs).

Marv
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad