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Author Topic: Moving on up from 35mm  (Read 1467 times)
Gilgamesh
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« on: March 04, 2013, 04:11:08 AM »
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Hi all.
I think I am about ready to re-kindle my relationship with my Mamaiya 7, although I'm only using an 80mm lens - good discipline / skills, I hear you mutter!


I had contemplated a replacement for my old, now sold, 'Blad 500c, but it does seem the D800e has ecilpsed it somewhat. I had set my sights on something "more" and thought the new 'Blad system might fulfil the brief, but the review here of the "D800e verses" has not convinced me there'd be any real advantage. I am sure someone else will proves links to scotch this idea!



My other interest is moving into some 5x4, and have booked a Calumet "Intro to LF" next month in London.

I have a few projects I am working on an as they're tripod mounted and shot mostly at dusk and night time, though not exclusively, I wanted to pick your collective brains if  may

1) it's obvious you need top-notch prime lenses to extract the very best from the D800e. I was looking at possibly the R series Leica lenses or the Carl Zeiss for starters. Any firm recommendations in the 24 - 135 range? The best I have are the 50mm and an 85mm circa 2000, which give almost identical results.


2) I want a 5x4 Field camera and lens set up and should be making myself more familiar with them.


I am aware of the Wista and Ebony but should I be looking at others, and if so, which ones?


I want a relatively compact system, one where I can go from 24mm - 135-ish (35mm equivalent) with one system.


Other considerations I have not set in stone yet, such as being able to shoot 120mm film or instant film with the 5x4.


My project is much like Stephen Shore's and Paul Grahams classic works and since I am taking time and effort to compose and really take considered images, I see no harm in moving up from the 35mm format.


I appreciate this is the proverbial can o' worms, but if you have any feelings on the above, please, do comment.


Thanks

Gil
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 04:14:06 AM by Gilgamesh » Logged
Gilgamesh
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2013, 04:15:09 AM »
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Hi all.
I think I am about ready to re-kindle my relationship with my Mamaiya 7, although I'm only using an 80mm lens - good discipline / skills, I hear you mutter!


I had contemplated a replacement for my old, now sold, 'Blad 500c, but it does seem the D800e has ecilpsed it somewhat. I had set my sights on something "more" and thought the new 'Blad system might fulfil the brief, but the review here of the "D800e verses" has not convinced me there'd be any real advantage. I am sure someone else will proves links to scotch this idea!



My other interest is moving into some 5x4, and I have booked a Calumet "Intro to LF" next month in London.

I have a few projects I am working on an as they're tripod mounted and shot mostly at dusk and night time, though not exclusively, I wanted to pick your collective brains if  may

1) it's obvious you need top-notch prime lenses to extract the very best from the D800e. I was looking at possibly the R series Leica lenses or the Carl Zeiss for starters. Any firm recommendations in the 24 - 135 range? The best I have are the Nikon 50mm and an 85mm circa 2000, which give almost identical results.


2) I want a 5x4 Field camera and lens set up and should be making myself more familiar with them.


I am aware of the Wista and Ebony but should I be looking at others, and if so, which ones?


I want a relatively compact system, one where I can go from 24mm - 135-ish (35mm equivalent) with one system.


Other considerations I have not set in stone yet, such as being able to shoot 120mm film or instant film with the 5x4.


My project is much like Stephen Shore's and Paul Grahams classic works and since I am taking time and effort to compose and really take considered images, I see no harm in moving up from the 35mm format.


I appreciate this is the proverbial can o' worms, but if you have any feelings on the above, please, do comment.


Thanks

Gil
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2013, 04:25:32 AM »
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Shooting with Large format is fun, but a bit annoying now that Quickloads have gone.

I have to confess that this pretty much put an end to the usage of my excellent Ebony 45SU.

I hear good things about a chinese brand called Chamonix that, major difference compared to Shen Hao, does innovate in terms of materials and is pretty affordable. The 45F1 seems interesting, assymetrical tilt is a critical function to use Scheimpflug.

http://www.chamonixviewcamera.com/

But since quickload is dead, why stick to 4x5 and not consider 8x10 or even larger? I am personnally contemplating 11x14 but will probably not proceed due to time constraints.

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 05:44:43 AM by BernardLanguillier » Logged

A few images online here!
Gilgamesh
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2013, 04:26:54 AM »
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Interesting.
Not considered beyond 5x4 due to its compact size really.
Open to suggestions though!
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Rob C
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2013, 10:30:37 AM »
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Shooting with Large format is fun, but a bit annoying now that Quickloads have gone.

I have to confess that this pretty much put an end to the usage of my excellent Ebony 45SU.

I hear good things about a chinese brand called Chamonix that, major difference compared to Shen Hao, does innovate in terms of materials and is pretty affordable. The 45F1 seems interesting, assymetrical tilt is a critical function to use Scheimpflug.

http://www.chamonixviewcamera.com/

But since quickload is dead, why stick to 4x5 and not consider 8x10 or even larger? I am personnally contemplating 11x14 but will probably not proceed due to time constraints.

Cheers,
Bernard


To that, may I add Chinese Chablis, taken very cold. Excellent with prawns.

Rob C
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Gilgamesh
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2013, 11:07:04 AM »
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Chablis can only be called chablis if it originates from..... Chablis!
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Rob C
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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2013, 01:35:01 PM »
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Chablis can only be called chablis if it originates from..... Chablis!


That was the fight Spain fought with France over Champagne!

However, though I agree with the idea of appellation d'origine contrôllée, I must vote for the excellence of the Chines white experienced in Singapore. They did call it by the French name, and I think their reasoning was that the vines were real enough, but imported. I'm not about to claim any sympathy with using falsehoods, and I know that the casks, the soil, and even the side of the hill are all factors supposed to change the flavour of the juice, but I have to give them credit where it's due!

;-)

Rob C
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epines
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2013, 05:16:25 PM »
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I wouldn't eliminate 4x5 as an option just because Quickloads are gone. Cleaning and loading holders is no big deal. If you're shooting thoughtfully, you won't blow through a ton of film. 8x10 is much more costly (gear, film, processing), sizable and heavy than 4x5.

There is so much excellent 4x5 gear available at dirt-cheap prices now, it's a crime not to get yourself some of it. Another camera to add to your list is the Linhof Technika, although they're probably more pricey since they've held their value well. I will never sell mine.
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