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Author Topic: Binocular Question?  (Read 712 times)
marcmccalmont
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« on: March 12, 2013, 05:11:21 AM »
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Does anyone know what optical properties cause binocular objects to appear paper thin but separated 3 dimensionally?
Is it 2 optical paths separated by 6" or maybe naked eyes integrate distant images differently?
Thanks
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 07:53:40 AM »
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Does anyone know what optical properties cause binocular objects to appear paper thin but separated 3 dimensionally?
Is it 2 optical paths separated by 6" or maybe naked eyes integrate distant images differently?

Hi Marc,

I assume most of it is due to the increased stereo base, coupled with magnification, that gives that impression. The stereo base determines the stereoscopic effect, also allowing to see a bit behind the edges of objects, and the magnification creates a seemingly flattening of depth due to perspective.

Cheers,
Bart
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 11:04:08 AM »
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Hi Marc,

I assume most of it is due to the increased stereo base, coupled with magnification, that gives that impression. The stereo base determines the stereoscopic effect, also allowing to see a bit behind the edges of objects, and the magnification creates a seemingly flattening of depth due to perspective.

Cheers,
Bart

Thanks Bart!
so I would guess the wider the spacing between the objectives the more pronounced the effect
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
k bennett
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 12:41:57 PM »
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Thanks Bart!
so I would guess the wider the spacing between the objectives the more pronounced the effect
Marc

Yes, and this is why porro prism binoculars have a more "3D" effect than roof prism models. The objective lenses are much further apart.

Of course, this is how a rangefinder camera works. The farther apart the RF windows, the more accurate the focus (in general.) Take a look at antique military optical rangefinders to see the extreme end.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 12:58:14 PM »
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Does anyone know what optical properties cause binocular objects to appear paper thin but separated 3 dimensionally?

The same thing I perceive in 3D movies and TVs: like paper cutouts positioned in different planes. Never occurred to me, until you mentioned it, that I observed it earlier in binoculars too.
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Slobodan

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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2013, 01:22:15 PM »
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Take a look at antique military optical rangefinders to see the extreme end.

see http://tedbrink.webs.com/germany20.htm or http://www.ebay.com/itm/German-WWII-Artillery-5-Meter-Coastal-Rangefinder-/300584834425?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item45fc409579 as examples of this
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Ellis Vener
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