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Author Topic: printing on metal  (Read 1276 times)
BGemeiner
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« on: March 13, 2013, 04:17:54 PM »
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I've recently started printing on metal and I'm using a ground coat that I'm not entirely happy with.  I've read about Dass and InkAid.  Has anyone tried either of these?  Or do you have another suggestion?

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Dan Berg
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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2013, 06:04:49 PM »
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Have used both with Inkaid being my preference.
Dass is off my list due to their small packaging and pricing structure.($200.00 gal.)
Use light coats so your drying time will be shorter. Dust is a killer and also the reason I do not resell metal prints.
Several companies sell precoated metals and although somewhat more costly they are pristine and a joy to work with. Do a quick search on this site as you will find many good reference threads on the subject.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2013, 08:47:59 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

neile
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2013, 10:46:49 PM »
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Dan beat me to it. Do a search for "aluminum prints" and you'll find many of our old threads on the topic. Pre-coated is the way to go, and it's still a pain Cheesy

Neil
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Neil Enns
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jecxz
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« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2013, 01:57:05 AM »
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Last summer I created 16 hand sanded aluminum pieces, 8 to 9 sized approximately 34x26, for a solo gallery exhibition in Philadelphia. I also used Inkaid for the process, which was tedious, however, the results were stunning, each pieces was one of a kind and the show was quite successful. I did a small write up of my process and experiences here: http://jecxz.com/main.asp?article=goingaluminum.asp

Email me if you have any questions and I'd be glad to help in any way I can.

Kind regards,
Derek Jecxz
www.jecxz.com
www.facebook.com/derek.jecxz.photographer

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Darron Chadwick
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 06:09:21 PM »
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hey do any of you guys use the canon 8400 or 8300 to print on metal I just lost my Epson 10000 which i printed on metal without any problem and am in the market for a new printer. I planed on the Epson 9900 or 9890 but seems like canon has a strong following here and I  have always hated dealing with clogs on my Epson and the expense of the inks  just curious on anyone else's expirence
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hugowolf
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 09:59:36 PM »
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hey do any of you guys use the canon 8400 or 8300 to print on metal I just lost my Epson 10000 which i printed on metal without any problem and am in the market for a new printer. I planed on the Epson 9900 or 9890 but seems like canon has a strong following here and I  have always hated dealing with clogs on my Epson and the expense of the inks  just curious on anyone else's expirence

The 8300 and 8400 do not have a straight feed path - you cannot feed stiff material.

Brian A
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2013, 01:51:28 PM »
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I recall reading that the Canon 6300 model (unlike the 8300) has a straight-through path fed from the back.  You might want to check that out.  --Barbara
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David Sutton
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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2013, 04:10:46 PM »
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I recall reading that the Canon 6300 model (unlike the 8300) has a straight-through path fed from the back.  You might want to check that out.  --Barbara
Indeed it does. Works fine.
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