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Author Topic: Experiences with the Schneider Vari-ND filter?  (Read 1018 times)
Thomas Geist
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« on: March 25, 2013, 06:54:44 AM »
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I am looking for a variable ND filter, mostly for use on wide angle lenses and also mostly used at very high densities (8-10 stops).

I have seen from many variable ND filters that they show a strong cross pattern under those circumstances. Does anybody have experience with the Schneider Vari-ND?

Thanks!
Thomas
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2013, 03:43:31 PM »
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Some (maybe all) of that is down to the geometry and physics of how t;ight and these things work. You might consider using a fixed ND filter + variable ND filter combination.
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Ellis Vener
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Thomas Geist
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2013, 06:55:49 PM »
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Thank you!

After talking to a lot of people, I am now strongly gravitating towards a fixed 10 stop (ND3) filter.

At first, Schneider's Tru-Match Vari-ND, that is based on a LEE filter holder with a 4x4" polarizer and a screw-on polarizer, seemed very interesting, albeit not cheap. However, further reading made me abandon this thought:

"Schneider True-Match Vari-ND Filter Disclaimer
Please note: An anomaly may occur when using a Variable ND filter when shooting wide angle (50mm and below) near to or at the highest ND point on the filter. The anomoly can be a very dark area in the center of the image, or an “X” pattern with lighter frame edges.

While all other manufactures only go up to a maximum of 8 stops Neutral Density, the Schneider Optics Vari-ND Filters boast a maximum of 11 stops ND. And because the anomaly only happens at the Max ND, no matter if the max of the filter is 6, 8, or 10 stops, that means when you use the Schneider Vari-ND filter at 8 stops, there is still no distortion in the image, where there would be in the competitor’s filter that maxes out at 8 stops.

For optimal performance, we always recommend using these filters on manual exposure. Vari-ND filters are best used for video capture at any aperture or wide aperture, high shutter speed still shooting.

Schneider Optics does not recommend Vari-ND filters for smaller aperture, long exposure still shooting."
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ScoTTTokar
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2013, 07:30:31 PM »
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You can MAKE your own variable ND filter by using two linear polarized filters stacked... That is all it takes, works great! Enjoy!
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2013, 12:18:49 AM »
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Hello,

I have wasted good money on a vari-ND filter which was a piece of rubbish.

I now keep a 6 stop and 10 stop ND filters in my Nikon D800 kit which work a charm.

Personally don’t waste your money with a vari ND filter.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2013, 12:43:28 AM »
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Hi,

I have used a Kenko Variable filter last year. It doesn't go to 10 stops but it is quite OK at 8 stops.

I tested on both wide angle 24-70/2.8 and telephoto 70-400.

Best regards
Erik






I am looking for a variable ND filter, mostly for use on wide angle lenses and also mostly used at very high densities (8-10 stops).

I have seen from many variable ND filters that they show a strong cross pattern under those circumstances. Does anybody have experience with the Schneider Vari-ND?

Thanks!
Thomas
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