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Author Topic: What can we expect from 9900 replacement? Is Epson listening?  (Read 1868 times)
iCanvas
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« on: March 27, 2013, 06:41:48 AM »
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Well, it's coming up 4 years since the 9900 was announced. I have had mine for about three years. What can we expect from the 9900 replacement? I would like to see less clogs and easier switch between matte black and photo black. What are your thoughts? To date I have not had a problem with my 9900. I print about twice a week.

Gar
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Czornyj
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2013, 07:09:33 AM »
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I expect it will never be announced.

Epson made a lot of new SureColor solvent/sublimation/dye machines, and concentrated on production market. So it's very likely there will be no new waterbased pigment x900 series machines for niche GA market.
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Marcin Kałuża
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2013, 01:46:01 PM »
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Epson's 7900/9900 are their 2 top of the line printers with great reviews since they came out.  No word on anything new coming out vs the S, T & F series that just came out.  The S series are Solvent printers, T series are the 5 color printers (sublimation) that replaced the 77/9700 and the F series are 4 ink Dye printers.

The Epson 4900 was their newest pigment printer from 2 years ago to match the 79/9900 series colors in a 17" printer.
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kdphotography
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2013, 01:51:14 PM »
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It seems like the 11880 (64" printer) would be next in line to update---and probably the easiest to update borrowing from the 9900 series...

ken
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Czornyj
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2013, 02:20:04 PM »
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It seems like the 11880 (64" printer) would be next in line to update---and probably the easiest to update borrowing from the 9900 series...

ken

I believe it alredy has an update - S70670 Wink Supersmall droplet, gray ink...
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Marcin Kałuża
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« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2013, 05:56:46 PM »
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I would like to see less clogs and easier switch between matte black and photo black. What are your thoughts?

That printer already exists, It's a Canon iPF8400. Bazinga!
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kdphotography
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2013, 07:33:54 PM »
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I believe it alredy has an update - S70670 Wink Supersmall droplet, gray ink...

But that's a solvent printer.  I see it as more for commercial print, signage, vehicle wraps, and not a fine art printer.  Otherwise I would have expected Epson to inundate my mailbox with samples and goad me to buy one already...   Grin
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Czornyj
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« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2013, 02:25:44 PM »
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But that's a solvent printer.  I see it as more for commercial print, signage, vehicle wraps, and not a fine art printer.  Otherwise I would have expected Epson to inundate my mailbox with samples and goad me to buy one already...   Grin

I saw few prints on some photo papers, and the results were impressive. In comparison to water based pigment there's still a difference, but it's not night and day as it was. I wish Mark would test permanence of these prints, I suppose it might be pretty durable.

It has potential to make funny things with silver or white ink, print on various media, achieve high dmax on matte papers and so on, and it doesn't stink that bad alredy.
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Marcin Kałuża
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« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2013, 02:38:13 PM »
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these day are long gone. the new ink are more durable, have more gamut and they claim  are not harmful anymore (i'll let you know in a few years if I'll have feathers on my back Cheesy ). durability is superior to water inks, especially outdoor. inks are partially melting the vinyl and pigments combines with the vinyl after the solvent evaporates, thus the pigments are sealed in the media. they can last years unlaminated outdoor.
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iCanvas
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« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2013, 10:38:21 AM »
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I just noticed that the Epson 9900 printer was announced in May of 2008, over 5 years ago. It would seem like Epson would improve the printhead technology, less clogs etc. I don't think they have ever waited this long to come out with a new product like this printer. I have had my 9900 for over three years and the warranty can't be extended beyond three years.

What improvement could Epson make on the 9900? Any thoughts?

Gar
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2013, 11:47:25 AM »
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User replaceable head that is affordable too.

--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2013, 12:34:54 PM »
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Aqueous ink printer innovation is slowing down as a plateau has been reached. I'd personally like to see a gloss optimizer and more grey inks in aqueous inksets. The inkset in the 13" Canon Pro-1 is pretty awesome and large format inksets can't match it yet. Solvent innovation is the exciting area right now and more and more manufacturers (like Epson and HP) are choosing to focus their efforts on catering to high volume production environments. From what I've heard, they will not be catering to the home office, low volume, "photo" enthusiast like they have in the past. Publicly they'll say the opposite of course.

What most people in the know can't say (but I still can) is that Epson is working on a new head for both the x900 series and the Surecolor printers (which appear to share the same heads) that they'd like to get out ASAP (its been in the works for a while already). How that will come to market I don't know. Onsite affordable head replacement would be nice but a new printer designation might be another approach they may choose to take. We'll see. That part I don't know.
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deanwork
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« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2013, 05:05:28 PM »
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Finally in the Canon 13" we have three gray inks and mk or pk  black on the fly plus gloss optimizer channels. That is a real quad set and the first I've seen.

This configuration IS what we need in all these machines from now on.

Are there any reviews that discuss the comparisons between the 2 gray and the three gray Lucia sets?  I've always wondered why they didn't remove the green and do that. I've read three reviews and no one even gets into the third gray ink aspect.  But why is this huge thing a 13" printer? They need a 17" to even think about competing with the 3880 I would think.

john
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shadowblade
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« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2013, 06:20:32 PM »
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Aqueous ink printer innovation is slowing down as a plateau has been reached. I'd personally like to see a gloss optimizer and more grey inks in aqueous inksets. The inkset in the 13" Canon Pro-1 is pretty awesome and large format inksets can't match it yet. Solvent innovation is the exciting area right now and more and more manufacturers (like Epson and HP) are choosing to focus their efforts on catering to high volume production environments. From what I've heard, they will not be catering to the home office, low volume, "photo" enthusiast like they have in the past. Publicly they'll say the opposite of course.

What most people in the know can't say (but I still can) is that Epson is working on a new head for both the x900 series and the Surecolor printers (which appear to share the same heads) that they'd like to get out ASAP (its been in the works for a while already). How that will come to market I don't know. Onsite affordable head replacement would be nice but a new printer designation might be another approach they may choose to take. We'll see. That part I don't know.

There are still a few things that could be done easily with aqueous inks, that wouldn't require any new technology - just a few more parts in a printer, which should be no problem for those machines aimed at high-end fine-art printing, like the 9900.

1. Printing on thicker media. It'd be nice to be able to print on thick, custom-made paper, or coated aluminium panel, without having to modify the printer for a 5mm clearance. All it requires is a raised print head and a straight paper path. Nothing too difficult there.

2. More inks. Six or seven black inks, plus a regular colour set, would give much better tonality, particularly where the tonality is in the luminance channel rather than the A or B chroma channels. Again, this doesn't require new technology - just three or four extra print heads.

3. A new yellow pigment. The one that Epson uses is known to be unstable, relative to the others. Stable yellow pigments are nothing new - all they need to do is grind up a different yellow pigment and encapsulate it, just like with any other pigment.

4. New pigments based on inert nanoparticles of varying size. These are already being used in paint, among other things. You can produce any colour in the spectrum with a carbon or gold nanoparticle of the right size, including different tones of black. It's a quantum effect of the particle's size, rather than a property of the pigment's chemical structure. These can be encapsulated in the same way as current pigments, are no more difficult to produce (just grind the solid to the right size) and won't fade at all. This would be a bit more of an investment than the others, since it would require a new line of inks, but the same pigments could also be used in solvent-based and UV printers (just suspended in a different solvent or monomer mix).

5. Pre- and post-heating elements for inks and paper. Faster drying = better results, whether on coated or uncoated papers. It would also allow up the printer to be used for both solvent and aqueous inks, opening up solvent printing to the home and small-studio markets.
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2013, 06:42:06 PM »
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Finally in the Canon 13" we have three gray inks and mk or pk black on the fly plus gloss optimizer channels. That is a real quad set and the first I've seen. This configuration IS what we need in all these machines from now on.

Are there any reviews that discuss the comparisons between the 2 gray and the three gray Lucia sets?

Yeah - you get it! It *is* cool and a sign of things to come. No reviews that I know of but I've used these and the output is fantastic as one would expect...
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