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Author Topic: IQ LiveView and heating up  (Read 2427 times)
Pics2
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« on: March 29, 2013, 03:52:33 PM »
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I plan to use IQ160 on a view cam. I'll be using LiveView for composing and focusing (no sliding back, just LiveView adapter).
Will the back be heating up a lot generating noise during LiveView composing and focusing? How long do I have to wait before making an exposure to let it cool down and avoid noise? Is this smart decision at all, is it better to use a sliding back (sliding back costs much more)?
Thanks!
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 03:54:57 PM by Pics2 » Logged
michael
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2013, 06:44:18 PM »
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I've been using an IQ180 with Live View on an Alpa, and have never experienced a heat/noise issue, even in the desert.

Michael
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Pics2
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« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2013, 03:28:14 AM »
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Great, thank you Michael!
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Schewe
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« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2013, 02:47:02 PM »
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Just a small note regarding focusing...Mike uses a rangefinder to focus and doesn't try to use LV...since the frame rate of the LV is 4-6 frames/second, it makes focusing very, uh, twiddly....it's fine for framing though. Also note you'll prolly need to get some NDs if you are planing on using LV in sunlight because the sensor will overexpose without an ND.
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Pics2
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2013, 03:14:20 PM »
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Thanks Schewe for explanation.
I'll use it in studio for still life. Now, I'm still not sure what to do. There is Schneider 120mm TS for DF body which is extremely expensive and it's still not a macro lens. On the other side if I can't focus properly with LiveView on LF camera, I have to buy a sliding back which makes the set up not cheap either. I wanted to build up a "starving student" Tilt/Shift option for DMF, but it looks like it's not possible Undecided
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Marlyn
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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2013, 04:11:32 PM »
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Using an IQ160, focus using the Focus Mask.   Yes you take a bunch of shots, but it is extremely accurate.
I do framing and basic focus with the live view (or pre-determined settings when using tile),  and main focus with the built in Focus mask. 

Note: I am using a Cambo Tech Cam, not the DF body.

Regards

Mark.


PS:    Not sure "IQ160 / Digital Medium Format"   and "Starving Student"  belong in the same hemisphere, never mind same sentence Smiley Smiley
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Pics2
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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2013, 04:52:18 PM »
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  PS:    Not sure "IQ160 / Digital Medium Format"   and "Starving Student"  belong in the same hemisphere, never mind same sentence Smiley Smiley

Ha -ha,Great point! I became a starving student by buying IQ160 Tongue
Thanks, that's a great tip. I need this for a Cambo, too.
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Guy Mancuso
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 05:32:38 PM »
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I almost never used live view with the DF or with tech cam. I relied pretty heavily on focus mask as I was shooting than comfirmed usually with a double tap to get 100 percent view. Trick on focus mask is figuring out the settings for each lens you had. For instance on my tech cam with a SK 60mm which is extremely sharp my setting was as high as 70 but on the DF with 110 it was more like 55 or 60.

What you don't want is seeing a lot of green focus mask. Get it to some smaller amount as
That would be more critically sharper. It's contrast based and if your number is too low you'll see a lot of green and some of it is sharp but not critically sharp. Really need a illustration here but you need to figure out your best setting on your lenses.

Honestly I specifically waited until I got a IQ back before I bought a tech cam.

Now in the studio live view is very workable in the field it's okay and frankly maybe more a pain than its worth.

Btw I had the IQ160 and IQ 140 for a short time as well.

« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 05:38:12 PM by Guy Mancuso » Logged

Pics2
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2013, 06:06:54 PM »
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What you don't want is seeing a lot of green focus mask. Get it to some smaller amount as
That would be more critically sharper. It's contrast based and if your number is too low you'll see a lot of green and some of it is sharp but not critically sharp. Really need a illustration here but you need to figure out your best setting on your lenses.
Guy, I think I understand what you are saying, no illustration needed. Thanks!
So, sharper lenses ask for higher Focus mask setting. That's great to know, it'll help me determine setting for specific lenses (MF and LF).
Now it's time to master IQ's LiveView and Focus Mask, before even acquiring LF. Your are right about that, too.
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Guy Mancuso
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« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2013, 07:04:03 PM »
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Correct and there are some settings for live view as well for best viewing. I don't know the best settings here so maybe someone can help on this end.
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Paul2660
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« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2013, 09:25:35 AM »
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Another thing to consider on Focus Mask, is that it seems to like contrast.  Many times in the early morning on early evening, I find that I have slightly over expose the first frame so to allow Focus Mask to really get the best read on the image.  After checking, I will then get the exposure where I need it.

However as a Tech Camera user, the LCD image review to me is still the most important.  Being able to double tap, and see the image at 100%, then make 4 quick finger movements to the corners for a check of focus made a big difference to me.  The P65+ which I was also considering at the time, just does not make this process easy.  I found it took much longer to get the image to 100% and then trying to navigate around at 100% took forever.   Also I found the image quality at 100% very hard at times to determine critical focus. 

Paul Caldwell
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Paul Caldwell
Little Rock, Arkansas U.S.
Photography > http://photosofarkansas.com
Blog> http://paulcaldwellphotography.com
Pics2
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« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2013, 09:51:46 AM »
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Thanks Paul!
I've been using a piece of printed paper for focusing still life for a long time, for the same reason - to have something contrasty to aid focusing process (the closer you get the smaller letter you need ). I guess it will come handy for Focus mask method, too.
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Guy Mancuso
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« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2013, 09:06:53 PM »
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Paul is correct sometimes to really see the focus mask especially when your settings are on the high side giving it a extra stop of exposure really works well. I know folks say tech cams are slow to work with but just ask anyone that has been working them a bit, you can really get fast at it. It's a process and its also a lot of fun too. I really enjoyed it.

My first moves with a tech cam is always the same . Get tripod at height you think you want second was always level the camera. Third which is usually the case with landscapes was the horizon line always falls to the middle of frame so pretty much standard was a 5mm rise on the back. Than its a quick shot and frame better and check focus. Than maybe by the 3 rd frame I'm damn close to a final image if not already nailed it.after that it was a LCC open up a stop or two .place LCC in front and pop shot off. Done

Maybe a few more steps than a DSLR type cam but certainly not really that slow.
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FredBGG
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« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2013, 09:46:29 PM »
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Thanks Schewe for explanation.
I'll use it in studio for still life. Now, I'm still not sure what to do. There is Schneider 120mm TS for DF body which is extremely expensive and it's still not a macro lens. On the other side if I can't focus properly with LiveView on LF camera, I have to buy a sliding back which makes the set up not cheap either. I wanted to build up a "starving student" Tilt/Shift option for DMF, but it looks like it's not possible Undecided

One possibility is a Fuji gx680 with a digital back adapter by kapture Group.
The Fuji gx680 is a system with tilt shift lenses from 50mm to 500mm. Tilt and shift are in both directions and independent.
It has a bellows focusing system so with the 80mm rail extensions you can get very close focus with nearly all the lenses.
The system also has several viewfinder options, including a movable high magnification loup view finder.



Here it is with a digital back.



Lens quality is very good... Fuji makes Hasselblads lenses....

There is also an adapter for large format lenses.

« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 09:51:57 PM by FredBGG » Logged
Pics2
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« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2013, 01:39:54 PM »
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Thanks, Fred!
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torger
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« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2013, 08:28:36 AM »
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If you're going to shoot still life with long lenses (say 80mm and up) a second hand 4x5" camera say a Sinar X (I'd choose a camera with geared shift and tilt as a minimum), and a second hand digital arts sliding adapter can be a good solution, and cheap. The weakness of 4x5" view cameras is that it's hard to achieve 100% parallelism which is important for wide angles, but tolerances are much higher for longer lenses. You can do wide angles on this camera too (heavily recessed lens boards required), but it will be tricky and high risk of image degradation due to accidental tilt.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2013, 08:34:02 AM by torger » Logged
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