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Author Topic: Samyang 24 T-S f3.5  (Read 15484 times)
mcbroomf
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« Reply #20 on: April 29, 2013, 02:51:18 PM »
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http://www.ephotozine.com/article/samyang-t-s-24mm-f-3-5-ed-as-umc-lens-review-21853?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Ephotozine+%28ePHOTOzine%29
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Mike Broomfield
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« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2013, 06:29:35 AM »
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Seems to perform pretty well in that write-up.  He says there is no auto-metering but other Samyang/Rokinon lenses have the option of a metering/auto-aperture chip for Nikon so I'd expect this one will too.
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jwstl
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« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2013, 11:41:09 AM »
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Here are some sample images from this lens via Pop Photo:

http://www.popphoto.com/gear/2013/04/sample-image-gallery-rokinon-t-s-24mm-f35-tilt-shift-lens
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Quentin
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« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2013, 12:11:32 PM »
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It looks remarkably like the Nikon equivalent.  Surely it must be made in the same factory. 
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
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« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2013, 01:55:41 PM »
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I'd highly doubt it. 
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2013, 06:09:19 PM »
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It looks remarkably like the Nikon equivalent.  Surely it must be made in the same factory. 

I believe that the Nikon 24mm t/s is manufactured in Nikon's Tochigi factory.

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
Quentin
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« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2013, 10:49:22 AM »
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Its is quite obviously the same design as the Nikon, so one wonders why that is the case - same designer, shared IP,  who knows?
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Quentin Bargate, ARPS, Author, photographer entrepreneur and senior partner of Bargate Murray, Law Firm of the Year 2013
Paul2660
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« Reply #27 on: May 02, 2013, 11:05:12 AM »
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Not quite the same design, as the Samyang will allow tilt and shift in the same plane by default. Cheesy  Nikon's 24 has to be modified for this, either by Nikon or user. 

Are the number of elements/groups the same?  I have not checked on that yet. 

Still have high hopes for this lens.

Paul Caldwell

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Paul Caldwell
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KLaban
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« Reply #28 on: May 02, 2013, 11:49:16 AM »
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Nikkor

13 lens elements
10 lens groups

Samyang

16 lens elements
11 lens groups
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Paul2660
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« Reply #29 on: May 02, 2013, 12:00:56 PM »
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KLaban:


Thanks, excitement grows!

Paul
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Paul Caldwell
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langier
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« Reply #30 on: May 02, 2013, 12:18:02 PM »
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As I would say..

If you need one now, rent or buy the Nikkor and move on. If you can wait, try them both and then decide.

In the mean time, rather than sitting around in anticipation, go out and use what you have getting more practice and experience on what you already have and become a better photographer!
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Larry Angier
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Quentin
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« Reply #31 on: May 02, 2013, 12:46:21 PM »
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I have the Nikon but if the Samyung is better, I'd be interested.
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jwstl
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« Reply #32 on: May 06, 2013, 12:35:43 PM »
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Here's a "First Look" report from Lensrentals.com. It sounds like it's not great wide open but quite good stopped down to f/8-f/11.

http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2013/05/first-look-at-the-rokibowyang-24mm-f3-5-tilt-shift-lens-part-1#more-13648
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« Reply #33 on: May 06, 2013, 01:51:16 PM »
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Difficult to really tell what he's doing.  The sample images on PBase have no explanation of how they were shot.  There is no aperture information.  In a few of the images it appears nothing is in focus on the full size versions so what was he doing for focus?  Whatever it was, it apparently wasn't very good.  Can't put a lot of stock in this evaluation, I don't think.
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sunnycal
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« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2013, 05:49:19 PM »
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the digital picture has the resolution chart up along with shift (click on focal length drop-down to see shift options).

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/ISO-12233-Sample-Crops.aspx?Lens=841&Sample=0&FLI=0&API=0&LensComp=0&CameraComp=0&SampleComp=0&FLIComp=0&APIComp=0

Pretty soft wide open, but by f/8 pretty good. Comparing to Nikon, Nikon shifted up and Samyang shifted down, are very good and very close.

http://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/ISO-12233-Sample-Crops.aspx?Lens=841&Camera=453&Sample=0&FLI=1&API=3&LensComp=632&CameraComp=614&SampleComp=0&FLIComp=4&APIComp=3
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stevesanacore
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« Reply #35 on: May 09, 2013, 06:29:17 PM »
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It sounds to me that the Samyang is quite inferior to both the Nikon and Canon equivalent. I can say from experience with both camera systems and shift lenses that construction quality is of paramount importance with a shift lens. Optical quality is of course most important, but if a shift lenses doesn't lock or stay put with solid knobs and positive locks, they are awful to use. I just don't see a market for a cheap shift lens.

I guess time will tell...
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free1000
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« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2013, 10:36:46 AM »
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Completely agree. The performance would need to be stellar to overcome problems with tricky knobs.

I'm intrigued by the lens rentals test more for its implied comparison of the Canon 24 TS-E and the Nikon PC-24, the resolution numbers are very close in those tables, but I'd heard that the Nikon lens was inferior.

That article fails to mention whether he was testing the I or II version of the Canon TS,  the II is far superior.

Also the locking mechanism on the II is great. I had some real problems with the version 1  tilt knob coming unstuck on jobs when I was in a tight time situation, very dodgy.
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Glenn NK
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« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2013, 01:28:05 PM »
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That article fails to mention whether he was testing the I or II version of the Canon TS,  the II is far superior.

I believe that it's a Mark II.  I can see (barely) the II just below where the hood attaches.

It reads:  "CANON LENS  TS-E  24mm  1:3.5 L  II

Also, I'm sure that the original doesn't have a "I".

At least it sure looks like mine (a II).

One feature I really like is that it's just about as good at f/3.5 as it is stopped down - which can be useful to keep shutter speeds up on low light situations (it actually falls off a f/8).

http://www.photozone.de/canon_eos_ff/603-canon24f35tse2?start=2

Glenn
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NancyP
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« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2013, 02:55:21 PM »
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Due to the poor performance wide open, this lens would seem to be a one trick pony, the one trick being tilt for deeper focus for landscapes, which is a large part but not all of my interest in trying TS. I am put off a bit by Cicala's observation about the tiny plastic components in the tilt-shift-rotate components, and his crack that there may be a 3D printer fabrication market for these tiny bits in a few years. The Samyang-origin lenses don't have authorized repair in the US, so potentially frail tilt-shift-rotate components make me very nervous about buying this at present, particularly because I have never had a TS lens before. If a year from now there are no reports about the lens breaking, I might reconsider - but I may have saved more for the Canon 24TS by then. And it is possible that Samyang may fine-tune the design.

All that said, I have a lot of fun with the Samyang 14mm f/2.8.
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jwstl
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« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2013, 04:09:24 PM »
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Due to the poor performance wide open, this lens would seem to be a one trick pony, the one trick being tilt for deeper focus for landscapes, which is a large part but not all of my interest in trying TS. I am put off a bit by Cicala's observation about the tiny plastic components in the tilt-shift-rotate components, and his crack that there may be a 3D printer fabrication market for these tiny bits in a few years. The Samyang-origin lenses don't have authorized repair in the US, so potentially frail tilt-shift-rotate components make me very nervous about buying this at present, particularly because I have never had a TS lens before. If a year from now there are no reports about the lens breaking, I might reconsider - but I may have saved more for the Canon 24TS by then. And it is possible that Samyang may fine-tune the design.

All that said, I have a lot of fun with the Samyang 14mm f/2.8.

I decided to pass on this one. I love my Rokinon 14 and like the 85, and 35 but those were purchased for less than $400 ea. That I can justify not having a repair facility. Based on reviews, the tilt/shift isn't in the same class optically or mechanically as the 3 I have and it will cost me as much as I paid for the 3 others combined. It's just not worth it. I'll either put that $1000 toward the Nikon 24 PC_E or wait for Nikon to update it and buy the new one.
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