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Author Topic: Coffee Pot Recommendations  (Read 14833 times)
Sheldon N
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« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2013, 03:55:00 PM »
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Forget a drip coffee machine. Get yourself a nice burr grinder (I have a Barazta Virtuoso) and make yourself either a small french press or learn how to do pour over coffee. Finally, make sure you get some decent coffee beans that were recently roasted (not more than a couple weeks old). I'm partial to Stumptown since it's local for me in Portland, OR. If I go to the coffee shop on the right day of the week I can get beans that were roasted just the day prior.

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WalterEG
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« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2013, 04:27:16 PM »
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To stay within the usual stereotypes, shouldn't Brits (and Scots?) refrain from giving advice on coffee or food? Grin

So true Slobodan,

The only good cup of mocha-java I could ever get in Blighty was at Café Diana near Notting Hill Gate and opposite the back door to Kensington palace.

Just as well I love a cup of tea.

Much as I do use the Bialetti for convenience, my preferred brew is powdered Turkish coffee made over very low heat in an ibrik.

Cheers,

W
« Last Edit: April 08, 2013, 04:28:48 PM by WalterEG » Logged
Gordon Buck
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« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2013, 05:13:41 PM »
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... do NOT want one of those premade cup devices.
 


Although I don't refill my own coffee pod, it can be done, see

http://www.wral.com/refillable-coffee-pods-are-affordable-alternative-to-k-cups/12290633/
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NancyP
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« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2013, 05:20:57 PM »
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I am afraid that I run low-tech for American style coffee. Grind the coffee in a rotary motorized grinder, dump into cone-shaped paper filter sitting in a funnel, drip. I do espresso in one of those aluminum two-piece pressure cooker pots (Bialetti moka). Turkish coffee - that is too strong for me, unless it comes with a piece of honey pastry (baklava). Mississippi mud, that Turkish stuff is.

Tea is easier. Plus, you get a free fortune in each cup.  Wink
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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2013, 05:59:56 PM »
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To stay within the usual stereotypes, shouldn't Brits (and Scots?) refrain from giving advice on coffee or food? Grin

Any tea advice would be, however, highly appreciated.

New York (pop as at 2011 - 8,244,910) has about 70,000 more people than London (8,174,100), and one more Michelin star restaurant. Just saying.
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luxborealis
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« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2013, 06:01:24 PM »
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It's not a "pot" or a "perk" but it makes a great cup of coffee: a Melita filter, a heaping measure of fresh grind with a kettle of not-quite-boiling water does the trick.
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WalterEG
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« Reply #26 on: April 08, 2013, 06:01:35 PM »
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Tea is easier. Plus, you get a free fortune in each cup.  Wink

I have a Greek friend who, in over 40 years, has never once offered me a coffee without tipping over the finished cup and read the dregs.

A piece or two of Turkish Delight can be a wonderful accompaniment — Rose or Almond?

Regards,

Walter
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2013, 06:33:39 PM »
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... my preferred brew is powdered Turkish coffee made over very low heat in an ibrik...

Ah, the true connoisseur! That's the type of coffee I grew up with.

Also known as Greek coffee (though in Greece only - where you would get a death stare if you'd order "Turkish" coffee Wink)
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #28 on: April 08, 2013, 06:36:02 PM »
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New York (pop as at 2011 - 8,244,910) has about 70,000 more people than London (8,174,100), and one more Michelin star restaurant. Just saying.

Right, Bill. That's like judging the quality of life in third-world countries by their fenced, five-star resorts Wink
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« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2013, 10:21:14 PM »
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Being from the home to some of the bigger thugs in coffee I thought I’d add a few coffee details.

Green Mountain coffee has their own brand of beans and is also the new mother ship for Tullie’s. They offer the Keurig line which is a complete “capsule” kit, just add water http://www.greenmountaincoffee.com/keurig-brewers?cm_mmc=Brand+Sites-_-Tullys-_-Products+Page-_-Keurig+Learn+More

Illy coffee has a wide variety of coffee makers, and some of my favorite coffee.
http://shop.illy.com/online/store/category_machines_us

Illy also offers “capsule” machines, similar to the ones that Green Mountain offers.
http://shop.illy.com/online/store/category_iperespresso-capsule-system_us

That other coffee company who’s name escapes at the moment has a wide variety of coffee makers
http://www.starbucksstore.com/verismo/verismo-machines,default,sc.html?cm_sp=HPA1US-_-verisimosale-_-040413

Lastly, these guys have some of the nicest coffee makers in the area. the following link is their home selection and they also provide several retail sized offerings http://www.visionsespresso.com/home-machines/

Of course, in this area, you have to plan very carefully to go more than a few blocks without finding a coffee shop, or two…
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Peter Mellis
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« Reply #30 on: April 09, 2013, 09:58:05 AM »
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Best coffee and easiest cleanup is either "pour over" (Melitta type set up) or a French Press; you will also need a decent grinder and air tight storage for your beans. Currently, I make one 32oz. press (2 people) every morning; grind beans, boil water, let the stuff sit 4-5 minutes and you get a really good cup. Very little space required and minimal cleanup; the press can be washed and left to dry. My biggest issue is finding beans that I like.

Aeropress is good also, once you get th hang of it.
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captzoom
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« Reply #31 on: April 09, 2013, 02:25:38 PM »
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Why let the paperfilters absorb all flavorful oils? French press is the way to go.  The other benefits have already been described.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #32 on: April 09, 2013, 05:35:48 PM »
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The pot makes little difference unless you use top quality beans, freshly roasted and freshly ground. I get my beans from local roasters (organic, fair trade, etc., of course) and mix my own blend, which always includes some Sumatra in a dark roast.

Naturally, I always play late Beethoven string quartets to the coffee while it is brewing...

Yum!
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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2013, 05:38:24 PM »
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Right, Bill. That's like judging the quality of life in third-world countries by their fenced, five-star resorts Wink

Blimey. Are things really that bad outside of New York?
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2013, 06:11:16 PM »
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Blimey. Are things really that bad outside of New York?

He, he... nice one Bill!

In all fairness, both countries are saved by ethnic restaurants. Last time I was in London, Turkish cuisine was all the craze. How many of those Michelin-star London restaurants are serving authentic English cuisine? The same question applies to NY, of course.
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Tonysx
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« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2013, 07:30:43 PM »
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He, he... nice one Bill!
In all fairness, both countries are saved by ethnic restaurants. Last time I was in London, Turkish cuisine was all the craze. How many of those Michelin-star London restaurants are serving authentic English cuisine? The same question applies to NY, of course.
One ought to ask when you were last in London? Turkish cuisine has never - to my recollection - been "all the craze". Popular sometimes but .....
I agree that neither the USA nor England is graced with good coffee. Perhaps the problem is places like Starbucks, McDonalds etc where the coffee is truly revolting. Burned beans, stewed coffee.
But for the OP who wants a cup or 2 at a time, get a French press or cafetière. You'll also need a kettle and a coffee grinder. But the combination of all 3 will provide very acceptable results. As for your coffee beans - they keep very well in a freezer. I buy mine in 10lb (approx) bags and grind as required.
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Ed B
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« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2013, 09:32:50 PM »
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Good fresh ground beans in this thing makes the best cup of coffee I've ever had.

http://www.evasolo.com/productinfo/567590/
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Tim_Smith
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« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2013, 08:56:49 AM »
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A small hand-crank burr grinder and a french press has recently transformed my understanding of what coffee can be. Nothing beats the convenience of setting up your auto-drip maker the night before to brew 5 minutes before you wake up—but it's a weak facsimile of coffee. When I first started using the french press I found it a bit fussy and mentally reserved it for "special" occasions or Sunday mornings. Now, I have rearranged my morning schedule to include it. For me, it's well worth the 7 or 8 minutes it requires to make it happen.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #38 on: April 12, 2013, 09:00:26 AM »
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A small hand-crank burr grinder and a french press has recently transformed my understanding of what coffee can be. Nothing beats the convenience of setting up your auto-drip maker the night before to brew 5 minutes before you wake up—but it's a weak facsimile of coffee. When I first started using the french press I found it a bit fussy and mentally reserved it for "special" occasions or Sunday mornings. Now, I have rearranged my morning schedule to include it. For me, it's well worth the 7 or 8 minutes it requires to make it happen.

Can't disagree one bit! I have a Super Automatic which is great for us lazy people first thing in the morning. The coffee is quite good. But it can't touch the same beans, ground in a burr grinder and then brewed in a french press! But it IS messy and more work. It takes some time to gauge how long you want to let the coffee and water live together. I read somewhere, never more then 10 minutes...
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« Reply #39 on: April 12, 2013, 09:17:38 AM »
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French press or percolator.  Percs make terrific coffee.  And yes, a burr grinder.  But if you really want to amp up your coffee experience, roast your own beans. 

I've been doing this for a couple years and it's the best coffee I've ever had.  You can buy home roasters but those can be expensive.  I use a simple stove-top popcorn popper called a Whirley Pop.  Works tremendously well.  Takes about 15 to 20 minutes to roast, then another 5 minutes or so tossing the beans in a metal colander to get out the chaff and start the cooling process.  Then just let the beans sit in the colander till cool and bag.
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