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Author Topic: Coffee Pot Recommendations  (Read 16547 times)
digitaldog
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« Reply #40 on: April 12, 2013, 09:19:47 AM »
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But if you really want to amp up your coffee experience, roast your own beans. 

I've toyed with the idea! Glad to hear you like it, this does sound like fun. I've even hear some do this in a popcorn popper with reasonable success.
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #41 on: April 12, 2013, 10:16:00 AM »
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I've toyed with the idea! Glad to hear you like it, this does sound like fun. I've even hear some do this in a popcorn popper with reasonable success.

That's what I use, Andrew.  That's what I linked to.  And more than reasonable success, for sure.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #42 on: April 12, 2013, 11:02:33 AM »
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... french press! But it IS messy and more work. It takes some time to gauge how long you want to let the coffee and water live together. I read somewhere, never more then 10 minutes...

Good points about the French press. The problem I had with the original French press design, the glass one, is that the coffee gets cold while brewing. I used to wrap it up in a kitchen towel, until I found a stainless-steel, double-wall insulated pot. Like this one.
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« Reply #43 on: April 12, 2013, 11:33:01 AM »
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I do the same when I use a French press.  I'd imagine one of those teapot covers would work too.  $80 for that one you linked is obscene!
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Tim_Smith
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« Reply #44 on: April 12, 2013, 11:39:24 AM »
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I justified the cost of my Frieling double-wall stainless press by going with a less expensive (but more than adequate for the coarse grind a FP likes) hand-crank grinder.

Roasting beans at home? Hmmmm. I'll have to think about that. I bet it's wonderful though.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #45 on: April 12, 2013, 11:51:51 AM »
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... $80 for that one you linked is obscene!

Agreed... that's why I paid only a half (whatever the promotion was at the time). Still expensive, though. There were times when I could afford it... not anymore.
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Rob C
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« Reply #46 on: April 13, 2013, 10:59:12 AM »
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Agreed... that's why I paid only a half (whatever the promotion was at the time). Still expensive, though. There were times when I could afford it... not anymore.


Affording is relative, not only to bank balance but also to mindset.

There are days when I can afford something, only discover the very next day - especially if I have actually been moved to making the  purchase - that I can't afford it. And nothing fiscal has changed overnight at all!

Anyway, I am now convinced that coffee is best left undrunk. As you may know, I am slowly converting cassettes to mp3 files, and also varnishing a repaired shutter the while, and confusion is creeping into my programme. Simple as the conversion turned out to be (once I'd realised the Help line was bullshit and I'd tempted Fate and gone my own way with the system), I have now twice recorded approximately an hour's worth of sound only to discover that when closing down another tab (possible during a part of the process to have an additional one open), I have become so spaced out with the heady mix of turps, varnish and coffee that I switch the whole goddam thing off and have to start again. So far, 40 tapes have been put to bed and I face a dozen or two more.

But I know I won't be able to kick the coffee.

Rob C
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #47 on: April 13, 2013, 03:48:05 PM »
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But I know I won't be able to kick the coffee.

Rob C
I find that drinking it works better than kicking it, Rob.  Cheesy
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Rob C
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« Reply #48 on: April 14, 2013, 08:36:19 AM »
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I find that drinking it works better than kicking it, Rob.  Cheesy



Eric, doesn't that rather depend on the coffee?

Rob C
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Rocco Penny
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« Reply #49 on: April 14, 2013, 08:42:28 AM »
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yeah if it starts roaring at you or hair starts growing over the rim, what do you do then?
Throttle it by any means necessary
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Rob C
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« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2013, 12:23:41 PM »
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yeah if it starts roaring at you or hair starts growing over the rim, what do you do then?
Throttle it by any means necessary



No, no, no!

You sing to it gently, persuasively, like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZBM6gydoTI&feature=share&list=AL94UKMTqg-9DMJ05R2KYZPpL6dDBPiJej

Rob C
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #51 on: April 15, 2013, 05:04:41 AM »
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May I dare to ask whether anyone would have a tea pot recommendation?

Or is it oot?

Cheers,
Bernard
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Rob C
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« Reply #52 on: April 15, 2013, 08:51:45 AM »
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No, Bernard, it isn't out; it's perfectly in.

Always use a china teapot, warmed up first with a rinse with boiling water from the kettle used to make the tea. This is essential for the production of a civilized cup of tea. Using anything other than a felt or knitted tea cosy is out, both aesthetically and thermodynamically. If you no longer have a granny who could make one for you, I suppose you could do worse than visit a second-hand shop - not for a granny, for a cosy - but be sure to have the cosy professionally cleaned before use. (Likewise if the granny proves irresistible to you.)

Happy sipping.

Rob C
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WalterEG
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« Reply #53 on: April 15, 2013, 02:24:47 PM »
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Rob has got it right for a 'Western' pot o' Rosie.

I also have a penchant for Middle Eastern tea made in a samovar by totally different method.

Might I direct your gaze to a superb essay about 'a nice cup of tea' scribed in 1946 by none other than George Orwell:

http://www.k-1.com/Orwell/site/work/essays/cupoftea.html

Enjoy,

W
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Rob C
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« Reply #54 on: April 15, 2013, 03:53:14 PM »
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I’m not sure Orwell has it right, though: not only is sugar a distraction, if not a destructor of the taste of tea as he rightly claims, but he goes on to make an even bigger pig’s ass of it by using milk!

Dairy products and tea don’t mix very happily. Milk can work wonders with some coffees in the right proportions, but all tea that I have ever tasted (and I did spend a few weeks on a tea plantation in the Nilgiris during my early youth) comes off better straight – much as whisky is supposed to do, though I did like that better on the rocks or with Crabbie’s as in Whisky Mac. (Unfortunately, such delights are now as much in the realm of the impossible as is a bottle of plonk; medical rationing, I’m afraid.) Never mind milk: the wrong sort of water can screw it up: try using chlorinated water which is sometimes all folks can get: it makes tea taste like a bathroom cleaner. Not that I have indulged, of course, but you get the picture.

Even the friggin’ coffee is meant to be restricted to a single, daily cup, but I tend to play fast and loose with that, claiming that I comply with the postprandial walking requirements each day and, in that manner, burn it off along with much of everything else that enters my system. Sounds convincing to me. As it was advice offered on leaving hospital, I suppose it was meant for the immediate future, and that advice dates from some years ago now and nobody has mentioned it since… you see the power of positive thinking?

Rob C
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WalterEG
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« Reply #55 on: April 15, 2013, 04:05:53 PM »
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but he goes on to make an even bigger pig’s ass of it by using milk!

I agree to a point Rob,

But these days in the Anglo-centric part of the world I suspect that tea is blended to work best with a dribble of moo-juice.

I have friends who live in Nepal and send me packages of tea straigh from the plantation and that is my core standard.  No milk.  No sugar.  No honey.  Nuffink!!

Just sip the nectar and be reminded of how inadequate coffee is by comparison.

Sip, sip,

W
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Rob C
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« Reply #56 on: April 15, 2013, 04:37:20 PM »
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Hell, much Indian is owned by TATA, the famous iron and steel behemoth... who knows what goes into tea today!

How you gettin' on with the new Swede? Any ankles to show me yet?

;-)

Rob C
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muntanela
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« Reply #57 on: April 16, 2013, 11:11:34 AM »
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The best is the old Napoletana  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neapolitan_flip_coffee_pot
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Rob C
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« Reply #58 on: April 16, 2013, 11:54:32 AM »
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Do you have to hold your breath? Reminds me of Amsterdam.

;-)

Rob C
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Riaan van Wyk
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« Reply #59 on: April 16, 2013, 01:18:16 PM »
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Two heaped teaspoons of Nescafe Classic with a spot of milk is perfect for me, easy and quick. I've given up on percolators, presses and whatever else, it's not worth the bother.
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