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Author Topic: What is DCI-P3 color space?  (Read 10379 times)
PeterF
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« on: April 10, 2013, 05:50:40 AM »
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Reading a press release from panasonic about a new high res monitor, I saw they gave the colour space as being DCI-P3 but I have no idea what this is. Anyone?

http://www2.panasonic.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/prModelDetail?storeId=11301&catalogId=13251&itemId=696014&modelNo=Content04052013011955234&surfModel=Content04052013011955234

"A true cinema production tool, the 4LH310 supports the DCI-P3 color space (defined by more than a 96% cover area), and facilitates digital cinema workflow with a LUT upload function. The 4LH310 can also accurately display industry standard color space of ITU-R BT.709."
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Schewe
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« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2013, 10:24:50 AM »
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Google is your friend...

DCI-P3 color space

The DCI-P3 color spec is the native colorspace for digital cinema projection in theaters.
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PeterF
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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2013, 01:09:56 PM »
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Google is not my friend. What on earth does that mean to a photographer? Adobe? Pro-photo?
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Schewe
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2013, 01:52:23 PM »
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DCI-P3 color spec (SMPTE-231-2) is a color space being for digital projection in theaters...

DCI-P3 (SMPTE-231-2)
White point
x 0.333
y 0.334

Red
x 0.680
y 0.320

Green
x 0.265
y 0.690

Blue
x 0.150
y 0.060

From those numbers you can create the DCI-P3 (SMPTE-231-2) color space in Photoshop and save it out as an ICC profile...then you could use that in any ICC aware scenario.

For further reading, here the full Digital Cinema System Specification (PDF)

All of this gleamed from Google in about 5 minutes. So, is there anything else I can look up for you?
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PeterF
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« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2013, 05:34:05 AM »
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Hi Jeff

Perhaps I am being too assumptive in what can be inherently read an inferred in my question on this forum. You see this particular forum is Raw & Post Processing, Printing and specifically to do with that; colour management. So my question actually means "How does the DCI-P3 colour space of the PANASONIC BT-4LH310 LCD PRODUCTION MONITOR relate to the colour spaces we commonly refer to in photographic use? (sRBG, Adobe RGB or Pro-photo RGB) In other words I am trying to ask 'What would I see in photographic terms on this monitor? in terms of colour gamut?'

Having only packed up my 4x5, Zone VI enlarger, scales and chemicals only a few years ago, all this digital terminology is still overwhelmingly technical at every turn. Your and Michaels tutorials 'Camera to Print and Screen' and 'Advanced guide to Lightroom 4' have been my most significant classrooms. But having started from zero, its still easy to loose me with technical terms, so while what you replied (I am sure) is all correct, along with that whole document you found on Google, it still means as much to me as if it were all said in Mandarin. I brought my question to the forum as I was unable to find on Google how the DCI-P3 color space TRANSLATES into terms that I understand: is it an sRGB, an Adobe RBG or somewhere in-between, or wider colour gamut? Google only tells me (as you have pointed out) what the DCI-P3 color space (and therefore this particular monitor) means in terms of video, something I (and surely this part of the forum) have no interest in at all.

If this monitor is a stable and wide gamut (Adobe RGB or higher) screen, then its exciting news; check out its size and resolution: 31-inch 4096 x 2160! Something like this is what I would like to have to see my D800 sourced 1.3 gig Pro-photo (stitched) 16 bit tiff files, which are then printed out on my 9700, so that I could get the best colour on my prints as possible. Would you agree?

Thanks for your replies though Smiley

Peter
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smthopr
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« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2013, 07:50:01 AM »
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Dcp color space is for movie theater cinema projection. It isn't relevant to still photography. If you want to color correct movies on this display, Panasonic is saying that their monitor is capable of this task. That's about it!
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PeterF
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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2013, 08:14:06 AM »
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So the monitor would be of no professional use to a photographer? Video application only?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2013, 08:53:57 AM »
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Google is not my friend. What on earth does that mean to a photographer? Adobe? Pro-photo?

Nothing really, ignore it.
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Andrew Rodney
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bjanes
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« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2013, 09:10:14 AM »
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DCI-P3 color spec (SMPTE-231-2) is a color space being for digital projection in theaters...

DCI-P3 (SMPTE-231-2)
White point
x 0.333
y 0.334

Red
x 0.680
y 0.320

Green
x 0.265
y 0.690

Blue
x 0.150
y 0.060

From those numbers you can create the DCI-P3 (SMPTE-231-2) color space in Photoshop and save it out as an ICC profile...then you could use that in any ICC aware scenario.

For further reading, here the full Digital Cinema System Specification (PDF)

All of this gleamed from Google in about 5 minutes. So, is there anything else I can look up for you?

To create the custom color space in Photoshop as you indicate, one needs the gamma. The HP site states that the gamma is 2.6. Using this gamma, I created the space and mapped it in ColorThink and compared it to ProPhotoRGB and sRGB.

Regards,

Bill
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Sareesh Sudhakaran
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« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2013, 10:41:37 AM »
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"How does the DCI-P3 colour space of the PANASONIC BT-4LH310 LCD PRODUCTION MONITOR relate to the colour spaces we commonly refer to in photographic use? (sRBG, Adobe RGB or Pro-photo RGB) In other words I am trying to ask 'What would I see in photographic terms on this monitor? in terms of colour gamut?'

I would guess pretty much what you are already getting. There is no comparison in layman's terms, and mathematical comparisons don't translate into real-world technology. Hence the importance of gamuts over color spaces.

This is the simplest explanation I can give:

Movies under the DCI specification (there are many others, but DCI is what the big studios Hollywood use) are encoded in the CIE XYZ color space (which basically translates to "the best theoretical space possible" - I interpret it as "whatever color space I want it to be"). CIE XYZ in layman's terms is the color space of the eye, based on CIE 1931, and which is still being revised as far as I know.

Projectors use different display technologies (DLP being the most common for theatrical display) than LEDs/LCDs/Plasma, etc. A movie, even though is supposed to be in CIE XYZ (smoke and mirrors), is usually conformed to what the projector can display, which is DCI-P3. It is the projector equivalent of sRGB (Computer displays) and BTU Rec.609 (HDTV). A post production studio for movies will need to work in this space because they too will have projectors for mastering.

The fact that the Panasonic 4K monitor is "96%" of DCI-P3 tells me the technology is similar to computer monitors (99% AdobeRGB), and nothing else. But sRGB and AdobeRGB will still exist, along with Rec. 609 (sRGB for all practical considerations).

Quote
...I was unable to find on Google how the DCI-P3 color space TRANSLATES into terms that I understand: is it an sRGB, an Adobe RBG or somewhere in-between, or wider colour gamut? Google only tells me (as you have pointed out) what the DCI-P3 color space (and therefore this particular monitor) means in terms of video, something I (and surely this part of the forum) have no interest in at all.

The answer to your question is of no interest to you either, because the answer is purely technical. It's the equivalent of asking "How does B&W and color TRANSLATE?"

The answer above is the best "translation" you're going to get without getting into the math.

Quote
If this monitor is a stable and wide gamut (Adobe RGB or higher) screen, then its exciting news; check out its size and resolution: 31-inch 4096 x 2160! Something like this is what I would like to have to see my D800 sourced 1.3 gig Pro-photo (stitched) 16 bit tiff files, which are then printed out on my 9700, so that I could get the best colour on my prints as possible. Would you agree?

I'm not answering for Jeff, but why not wait until the monitors are shipping and tested in practical terms? In theory though, I believe these monitors will be as capable as the high-end prosumer models from Eizo and NEC - i.e., they will do 99% Adobe RGB.

Whether or not they will give 'you' the 'best' color on 'your' prints, not even Panasonic can answer.
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« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2013, 12:23:52 PM »
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The HP site states that the gamma is 2.6. Using this gamma, I created the space and mapped it in ColorThink and compared it to ProPhotoRGB and sRGB.

Yep...I forgot gamma...good catch.
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PeterF
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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2013, 08:19:09 AM »
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Hi Sareesh

Thank you, this is the answer I was looking for! If this monitor is indeed is as you surmise, displaying 99% of the Adobe RBG colour space then for its size and resolution it will be very good. But as you wisely suggest we will all have to wait and see what its shipped and tested.

As for the 'best' colour, that would be what I choose and hopefully not something else besides what I saw on my monitor, which means I, as all photographers, need and true a (calibrated) monitor as possible Smiley
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PeterF
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2013, 08:21:19 AM »
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Thanks Bill, that graphic speaks more that a thousand words!! Smiley
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