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Author Topic: Why are mirrorless cameras slower than DSLRs?  (Read 3614 times)
smozes
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« on: April 10, 2013, 02:26:28 PM »
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Time and time again, a new mirrorless camera is announced, and slow AF or some other lags are reported.

What makes DSLRs so fast: maturity, something inherent to the design or just powerful large internals?
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 02:29:13 PM by smozes » Logged
EduPerez
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2013, 03:12:21 AM »
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Well, for starters SLR cameras tend to use faster phase-detection autofocus, using dedicated sensors located on the bottom of the mirror chamber, while mirrorless cameras have to use slower contrast-detection autofocus, using the image sensor:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autofocus
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SZRitter
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« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2013, 01:29:31 PM »
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Isn't the fastest single focus acquisition a mirrorless camera? Where contrast is worse than a DSLR is in tracking. Something that phase is pre-disposed to being good at. Of course some mirrorless now feature phase and contrast, but I don't know how fast they are.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2013, 01:34:40 PM »
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Hi,

On a mirrorless camera you see a processed image, it will always be a bit lagged. On a DSLR you see the actual image with no lag.

A mirrorless camera may have slower contrast sensing AF while DSLRs have phase detecting AF which usually is faster. That may change.

Mirrorless cameras can react faster than DSLRs. So time from shutter release to exposure can be much faster than on DSLRs.

Best regards
Erik



Time and time again, a new mirrorless camera is announced, and slow AF or some other lags are reported.

What makes DSLRs so fast: maturity, something inherent to the design or just powerful large internals?
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GWStudioLA
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« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2013, 11:07:22 PM »
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I recently started using my new Fuji Pro x 1 and while I heard some people complain that this camera is small with autofocus I find it to be very smooth and as long you know what you're doing...
It's an amazing camera and I would not trade it for any canon or nikon
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SZRitter
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 10:06:56 AM »
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So you like it? I'm debating switching out my D7000 for the X-E1 right now.
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Petrus
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2013, 02:41:33 PM »
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So you like it? I'm debating switching out my D7000 for the X-E1 right now.

I have Fujifilm X-Pro1 and did have X-E1 also as a spare body (now X100s). I also have Nikon D4, D3 & D800e. I would not switch any of those Nikons for Fuji, and any Fujis for a Nikon. They are different tools for different purpose.

If I could take just one body: D4
If I could take just one body for landscape: D800e
if I could take just one body for street photography: X-Pro1
if I could take just one body for candid travel photography: X-Pro1

I take the Nikons for the tool value: they get the job done.

I take the Fujis for the feel: I blend in and connect.

I take the Fujis for the feel:

The reason I ditched X-E1 was because it has EVF only: time lag, VF smearing in low light, no real connection to the subject.

That said, I will take only the Fuji cameras to my next adventures in Asia, but 95% of my work happens with those Nikons.
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hjulenissen
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« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2013, 12:05:15 AM »
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There are several kinds of "lag". The viewfinder lag, the shutter-lag, the waiting period before you can take another picture...

I'd say that the AF and general size/battery/price/maturity/target audience are probably all factors that can contribute to DSLRs being perceived as "faster".

As "all" DSLRs now have liveview, and a growing number of mirror-less cameras have on-sensor PDAF, I think that the practical distinctions are getting blurred.

-h
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