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Author Topic: Hardware Calibrating LUT  (Read 2118 times)
bmb
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« on: April 11, 2013, 09:18:31 AM »
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Being a newcomer to the calibration issues, even after doing online research on the topic of LUT display calibration I have the following doubt:

a) If I calibrate the LUT on a display using a colorimeter like i1 Display Pro, will the result be an .icc profile that I will have to load in the Mac Os X's Display system preference or does the displays hardware assume the calibration by itself?

Thanks
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digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2013, 09:23:27 AM »
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I believe it depends on the display (can it load that data?). You say If I calibrate the LUT on a display... so that would imply it's loaded in the panel although the profile itself may have the same data for a display that can't.
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2013, 09:27:29 AM »
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The display I am referring to would be a Dell U2413 but judging from your answer perhaps I don't understand what a LUT is. I thought the LUT was a display's hardware lookup table.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2013, 09:30:28 AM »
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It's just a Look Up Table (hopefully a 3D table). It might be loaded in the panel (hopefully in high bit) or on the graphic system (might not be high bit depending on a lot of factors).
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2013, 09:58:45 AM »
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I am not sure about that. I assumed from the reviews I read on the Dell U2413 that the LUT settings would be available on the monitor itself.

My initial question related to a wider situation:

I am trying to decide if I should buy a second display (to use as part of a 2 display system) that is standard gamut like the one I have now (Dell U2412M) or if I should get a wide gamut display (U2413).

One of the issues I have is that I will be using this setup with a MacBook Pro (13" mid. 2010 model) laptop which only has a port for 1 display. To get around this I will be using this setup with a Matrox Dualhead2Go expansion box which fools the Operating system into thinking that both monitors areone big monitor.

I haven't tried the matrox yet but it seems rather logical to assume that the caveat to this will be that I won't be able to load two different calibration profiles for both displays at the same time. So what I am really trying to find out before I commit to purchasing a wide gamut display is if a possible workaround for this would be to have one monitor use the calibrated colorsync profile and tweak the other one (the wide gamut one) to match the gamut of the first. I realize this would reduce my colorspace on both to sRGB but this would be for non-critical color work as a way to get both displays to show a reasonable color resemblance.

On the other hand, when needing color-critical work I would load up the Adobe RGB settings for the wide gamut display and trust that display for color editing.

But there is also the issue of the graphics card (Nvidia GeForce 320M) and the operating system (Mac OS X 10.8.2) not being to handle 10-bit color even when using Photoshop or Illustrator. I am not sure if this graphics card will nly output 8-bit.

Being a graphic designer I could benefit from the wide gamut color gamut but I am not sure that my current system can handle it as from what I have read it seems that just having a wide gamut display might not do anything for me in the end.

I plan to upgrade my whole system sometime in the future but I just don't know if right now it's worth to invest in a wide gamut display.

Although I am not sure I understood your previous reply, I appreciate your help. Thank you.
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