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Author Topic: HPLV sprayer PSI  (Read 2079 times)
Kanvas Keepsakes
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« on: April 17, 2013, 07:57:55 PM »
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Hey guys just curious what PSI you all set your gun to for spraying laminate.  I just started spraying today with a new gun and big compressor and BOY is this gun spraying a WHOLE bunch out.  I mean I have a thick cloud hovering around me.  I have mine set to 40 PSI.  I can't get an even thick spray like I usually get with my Waygner and turbine system. 
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2013, 08:50:47 PM »
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I have the pressure on the compressor set for 45-50 psi; but I don't get a lot of overspray. It sounds like you need to adjust the knobs on the spray gun to use less air and laminate.
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kdphotography
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2013, 09:52:00 PM »
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Needle size used on the gun correct?
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Kanvas Keepsakes
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2013, 10:05:19 PM »
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This is the gun I bought

http://www.lowes.com/pd_301339-47120-SGY-AIR87_0__?Ntt=kobalt+small+gravity+feed+spray+gun&UserSearch=kobalt+small+gravity+feed+spray+gun&productId=3360952&rpp=32
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Colorwave
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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2013, 11:06:51 PM »
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Before I switched to a turbine based HVLP, I used to spray with a similar gravity feed gun at around 35psi.  With the right needle and fluid tip/orifice size, you should be able to turn the material and fan all the way up.  You might want to back the air knob off a little, but with a reasonably low pressure, you should not need very much pressure.
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John Nollendorfs
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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2013, 12:33:30 PM »
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From the looks of it, the knob near the hose connection is used to adjust the air flow. Turn down the airflow so you get less back spray. You might want to practice with plain water, adjusting the settings and watching the flow coming from the gun against a dark background.

Also, I like to use the "flat fan" mode, which allows you to overlap strokes for even coverage.

When cleaning up, make sure you get all the air openings at the nozzle clean and open, or your spray pattern next time will suffer.
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Kanvas Keepsakes
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« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2013, 04:51:06 PM »
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Thank you guys!
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bill t.
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« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2013, 05:43:48 PM »
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Load the gun with water and spray into a narrow necked jug for 1 minute.  100 to 120ml is about right.  For a fan size around 8 inches wide at 9 inches from the canvas, you would move the gun about 1 foot per second with a 50% overlap between swipes, which means adjacent swipes are about 4 inches apart.  3 to 4 coats should do it.  Do it by the numbers, and you will never fail.  The quality of the fan pattern matters a lot, make sure is a fan and a lot more rectangular than round.  You may need to twist and prod the cap a bit to get a good pattern.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2013, 05:45:53 PM by bill t. » Logged
Kanvas Keepsakes
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2013, 09:06:20 PM »
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Bill when you say 3 or 4 coats do you mean left to right and up and down as one coat?  Or just left to right as one coat? 
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bill t.
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« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2013, 02:08:31 AM »
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I only coat up and down, along the 51" dimension of the 51x97" piece of coroplast upon which I tape up my prints for coating.  I have permanent, numbered marks at the top and bottom of the coroplast exactly 4" apart.  And my spray gun fan is set very close to 8" wide.  One coat 1, I go from mark to mark.  On coat 2, I go to and from positions 1/3 of the way between marks.  On coat 3, the path is between positions 2/3 of the way between marks.  I also use a metronome for timing, and I weight the gun at the beginning and end of each coat to verify the amount of paint applied.  And when I clean the gun at the end I spend a minute adjusting the spray pattern to perfection for the next use using the cleaning water.  I get absolutely, positively zero visible mottling, patterning, or unevenness in the coatings.  That's because I'm the next best thing to an industrial robot.  But if you're just kind of winging it, it will show.  You've got to get coating down a totally controlled and defined routine, or you will lose a lot of canvas.  Haven't lost a canvas or got a mediocre coating in a very long time.
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Luca Ragogna
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« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2013, 06:01:04 PM »
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I have my gun set to 15 - 20 psi. It works great for my particular gun with Timeless satin.
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smjphoto
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« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2013, 11:46:09 PM »
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Is this gun you linked a HPLV? The linked description doesn't seem like it.  I have no idea if that's an issue so I thought it worth asking.
Stuart
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Kanvas Keepsakes
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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2013, 02:14:34 PM »
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Stuart, good call.  I looked at the box and the manual and sure enough it doesn't say HPLV anywhere. On my way to Harbor Freight!
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enduser
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« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2013, 07:54:20 PM »
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The  guns I've used have had a small viscosity tester.  You time how long it takes for your product to run through it and compare that time with the recommended manufacturer's time.  Adjust with the relevant dilutant, usually water, until the run time is correct.  Getting this right  always made a big difference for us.
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