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Author Topic: New pc build with i7 3770K  (Read 6043 times)
Philmar
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« on: April 21, 2013, 04:23:01 PM »
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This build is for photo editing with Lightroom and Photoshop CS3. I probably will start to use the video capabilities of my Canon 5D3. This is what I have so far. The power supply, CPU cooler will sort themselves out later.

CPU - Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core
SSD - Samsung 840 Pro Series 240 GB
HD disks - 2 x WD Green (WD30EZRX) 3TB
Case - Antec P280

What I really need help with is the mobo, memory and video card.

MOBO: I have decided to go with a 1155 socket and Z77 chipset. I have never overclocked because my hobby is photography not voltages, latency, multipliers ect. I never liked going in to the BIOS and trying to figure out what to do. And then fine tuning voltages, multipliers and monitoring temperatures aaargh!! But I think I'd like to OC this new build because if one can get better performance for free, why not? And more importantly I read now that some ASUS mobos like Sabertooth Z77 and ASUS P8Z77-V DELUXE have automatic OC features on them. If you donít want to perform those complicated OC you can easily select the performance mode on the BIOS setting for painless overclock. It will result in 4.2GHz frequency with full system stability using the Core i7-3770K. This appeals to me. A LOT. I would pay more for a mobo that allows EASY overclocks. These aren't boards for the casual builder, but satisfy the most driven overclockers and tweakers.

Similarly, I don't want to pay for features I won't use/don't need: WiFi, wireless features, customizable fan controls, multi-GPU support, ECC memory, surround sound, remote-control access via a smartphone or tablet.

So I can easily afford either of the Sabertooth Z77 and ASUS P8Z77-V DELUXE but why overspend? Can anyone suggest another Z77 mobo that has easy OC features but less features like wireless connectivity and dual GPU support that I don't need?

Memory: I want 16 GB of DDR 3 RAM. I am clueless about memory. In light of the fact I'd like a mobo with easy OC features that will permit me to OC an i7 3770K at 4.2 GHz is there any type of memory that will work better? I'd pay no more than $150 for it. Will 4 sticks of 4GB work better than 2 sticks of 8gb?

Video Card: I own a Canon 5D3 that shoots video. I definitely will get in to video some time soon. But I don't know what video card I should get. I most definitely do NOT play video games. So I can skimp here I think. But I DO need 2 monitor support.
I thank you in advance for any help.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2013, 04:33:24 PM by Philmar » Logged

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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2013, 09:30:21 PM »
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This build is for photo editing with Lightroom and Photoshop CS3. I probably will start to use the video capabilities of my Canon 5D3. This is what I have so far. The power supply, CPU cooler will sort themselves out later.

CPU - Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core
SSD - Samsung 840 Pro Series 240 GB
HD disks - 2 x WD Green (WD30EZRX) 3TB
Case - Antec P280

What I really need help with is the mobo, memory and video card.

MOBO: I have decided to go with a 1155 socket and Z77 chipset. I have never overclocked because my hobby is photography not voltages, latency, multipliers ect. I never liked going in to the BIOS and trying to figure out what to do. And then fine tuning voltages, multipliers and monitoring temperatures aaargh!! But I think I'd like to OC this new build because if one can get better performance for free, why not? And more importantly I read now that some ASUS mobos like Sabertooth Z77 and ASUS P8Z77-V DELUXE have automatic OC features on them. If you donít want to perform those complicated OC you can easily select the performance mode on the BIOS setting for painless overclock. It will result in 4.2GHz frequency with full system stability using the Core i7-3770K. This appeals to me. A LOT. I would pay more for a mobo that allows EASY overclocks. These aren't boards for the casual builder, but satisfy the most driven overclockers and tweakers.

Similarly, I don't want to pay for features I won't use/don't need: WiFi, wireless features, customizable fan controls, multi-GPU support, ECC memory, surround sound, remote-control access via a smartphone or tablet.

So I can easily afford either of the Sabertooth Z77 and ASUS P8Z77-V DELUXE but why overspend? Can anyone suggest another Z77 mobo that has easy OC features but less features like wireless connectivity and dual GPU support that I don't need?

Memory: I want 16 GB of DDR 3 RAM. I am clueless about memory. In light of the fact I'd like a mobo with easy OC features that will permit me to OC an i7 3770K at 4.2 GHz is there any type of memory that will work better? I'd pay no more than $150 for it. Will 4 sticks of 4GB work better than 2 sticks of 8gb?

Video Card: I own a Canon 5D3 that shoots video. I definitely will get in to video some time soon. But I don't know what video card I should get. I most definitely do NOT play video games. So I can skimp here I think. But I DO need 2 monitor support.
I thank you in advance for any help.

question... why the WD greens? They are 5400rpm drives.

I'm partial to Gigabyte motherboards myself.  They have some nice choices.

I recently did a new system and when with the GTX670 video card. 
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Philmar
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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2013, 10:10:03 PM »
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I thought WD were more reliable than Seagate but i didn't realise the Seagates were 7200 RPM.  Thanks

Do the Gigabytes come with auto overclock software/BIOS?
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2013, 01:48:07 AM »
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I thought WD were more reliable than Seagate but i didn't realise the Seagates were 7200 RPM.  Thanks

Do the Gigabytes come with auto overclock software/BIOS?

Yes, both the auto "turbo" feature on the intel side, and on the gigabyte side the preset features. Use the intel turbo features and don't bother with the other imo.  I don't want to get into the overclocking debate, I've overclocked and I've not overclocked.  It depends on the current CPU's and Chipsets.  But in either case the gains from overclocking are marginal. The Intel turbo feature takes you to 3.9 as you need it, back down when you don't.. and any difference between 3.9 and 4.2 is very small.  And keep in mind the 4.2 keeps the machine ramped up al the time.


Agree with Craig, go with the 7200 WD Blacks for the combination of speed and reliability,.


The Samsung Drive  you selected is probably the best combination of features, speed, and cost available.  I recently went to these for my builds and haven't had any trouble.

I didn't see a power supply listed?  I'm partial to the Seasonic Platinum 850's for your level of build.

I use both the Asus and Gigabyte boards but lately am partial to Gigabyte.  For both cost is linked to features, the number and type of ports, voltage regulation to better handle overclocking, and other overclocking features.



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Sareesh Sudhakaran
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2013, 03:13:13 AM »
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This build is for photo editing with Lightroom and Photoshop CS3. I probably will start to use the video capabilities of my Canon 5D3. This is what I have so far. The power supply, CPU cooler will sort themselves out later.

CPU - Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core
SSD - Samsung 840 Pro Series 240 GB
HD disks - 2 x WD Green (WD30EZRX) 3TB
Case - Antec P280

Nothing wrong with Green drives for the work you're doing. Green drives, as far as I know, aren't fixed 5400 rpm drives. They are able to rev up when required.

However, if you're going to be copying large chunks from one drive to another on a regular basis, go with a 7200 rpm drive.

Quote
What I really need help with is the mobo, memory and video card.

MOBO: I have decided to go with a 1155 socket and Z77 chipset. I have never overclocked ...But I think I'd like to OC this new build because if one can get better performance for free, why not?

Because you don't need it really, and if you don't know how to do it or don't know anyone who does forget it.

Quote

Memory: I want 16 GB of DDR 3 RAM. I am clueless about memory. In light of the fact I'd like a mobo with easy OC features that will permit me to OC an i7 3770K at 4.2 GHz is there any type of memory that will work better? I'd pay no more than $150 for it. Will 4 sticks of 4GB work better than 2 sticks of 8gb?

From ppbm5.com I've learnt that low voltage RAM modules are more stable when overclocking. Typically you get 1.5V, but some say 1.35V works better. You might want to look into that.

In general, you might want to populate with 4 sticks. Though, I'm not sure the performance difference will be noticeable in the applications you're looking at.

To be honest, I would get at least 32 GB RAM if photo editing is your thing. If I had to save money, I'd reduce the CPU to an i5.

Quote

Video Card: I own a Canon 5D3 that shoots video. I definitely will get in to video some time soon. But I don't know what video card I should get. I most definitely do NOT play video games. So I can skimp here I think. But I DO need 2 monitor support.
I thank you in advance for any help.

The integrated graphics card (HD 4000) can usually drive two monitors (up to 3 based on chipset - find a mobo that can support it), but it depends on what resolution you want. In general, I'd say a GTX series (the best you can afford) that is supported by Adobe CS is good. Nvidia is a requirement for Resolve as well, if you want to go that way.

However, if video isn't a big thing, but only a sporadic activity, you don't need a graphics card. The HD 4000 supports H.264 and MPEG-2 natively, with hardware acceleration for playback.

Hope this helps.
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 04:00:46 AM »
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I built a system late last year with an almost identical spec. and it runs very well.

I used a Z77 Gigabyte board which has been reliable and is well featured, except with some USB3 problems I've never fully resolved. This may be down to an installation issue, so I'd recommend making sure absolutely everything works as it should after the initial OS install before starting program installs. That way a re-installation to sort any issues wouldn't be too onerous.

Steve's comments on over-clocking are on the money. You probably won't see any difference with that difference between 3.9 and 4.2, so it's not worth the hassle. My experience in the past has been pretty poor of automatic overclocking features. Fine if your hobby is fiddling with computers, but if you just want to get on with work stick to the standard clock rate.
It's not really worth spending a lot on high spec memory that can be hugely overclocked, better to just buy 32gb of ram instead.

WRT video, any of the Nvidia cards that are supported by Adobe Premiere Pro 5 would be fine. They'll not only support PP's Mercury playback engine (which makes a lot of video edit work fly), but work well with most other programmes that use GPU acceleration.
There's no need to go for the most modern and I'm very happy with a GTX470 which drives two monitors comfortably and runs PP5 sweetly when I need it.
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 07:00:54 AM »
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For good advice on ram, try the following forum: http://www.gskill.us/forum/
I have never used the forum, i have read through some info relevant to what i wanted, the forum was recommended to myself.
Cooling What are you thinking of doing to keep the system cool, especially if you do overclock(I wouldnt myself)? I just built a system(I5), and installed a corsair water cooler, it was noisy and the cpu cooler was running at 4K rpm, not right i thought. After some research, i found corsair coolers can have problems, have since installed a noctua air cooler(2 fans) + 3 system fans. The noctua cooler is silent, i recommend.  The fans run @400 rpm, my system has never gone over 40 C running LR and PS.
PSU is important, seasonic are highly regarded. Though expensive.
Agree on your SSD choice.
I dont know much about your case choice, I know some of the coolermaster are again well thought of, so if the Antec is similar in spec then should be ok.
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Philmar
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 01:36:21 PM »
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Thanks Steve and Sareesh. Your information is invaluable! I had no idea that this Turbo Boost stuff existed but it pretty much makes my thoughts of overclocking pointless. Photography is my passion, not entering a BIOS - so I best forget worrying about getting that marginal extra CPU performance and just concentrate on my photography. So really I should pick a mobo that runs my components best at stock speeds. I really donít need a a mobo that has SLI or Crossfire support but I just worry that the ones that donít may be inferior in the way their connections are soldered or the materials they use.
Any recommendations?
Points taken on the HDDs Iíll consider that.
Power supply? I know they are important but Iím just looking at narrowing down the mobo first.
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2013, 05:09:52 PM »
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One other point about memory.  If you choose something other than the stock cpu cooler make sure you get the low profile memory.  Memory with big fins MIGHT work but its a crapshoot.

Cases...if you can find a Lian LI v1020b, buy it. Its the best case I have ever used and I suspect it will last for a few more builds. might be a few more around if you search.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811112308

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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2013, 06:18:41 PM »
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I recently got the Antec P280.  I have never seen the Lian, but think the P280 is great. Easy access from both sides, easy to maneuver cables around.

BTW...Gave the ANtec Kuhler a try.  Seems to work great....I have very hot i7-980 (3.33, 6 core).  Normally ran hot, overclocking by a bit ran it up to 100C and processor slow down.  With Kuhler rarely gets over 40-45C, if up to 50C the fan picks up and quickly pulls it back.  Easy to fine tune, but you have to give up USB port.  Runs VERY quiet.
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Philmar
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« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2013, 02:45:07 PM »
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Thanks for the replies thus far everyone!

I've decided that I don't need to overclock this build. I'll get a mobo that supports Intel Turbo Boost.
Since I don't ever play games I don't need 2 GPU SLI or Crossfire support. Similarly, I don't want to pay for features I won't use/don't need: WiFi, wireless features, multi-GPU support, ECC memory, surround sound, remote-control access via a smartphone or tablet.
So should I look for a low end mobo that is fast at stock clock speed and has dual monitor support? My only concern is that a cheaper mobo will not run as fast at stock speeds as a better quality mobo.

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« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2013, 03:53:05 PM »
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Thanks for the replies thus far everyone!

I've decided that I don't need to overclock this build. I'll get a mobo that supports Intel Turbo Boost.
Since I don't ever play games I don't need 2 GPU SLI or Crossfire support. Similarly, I don't want to pay for features I won't use/don't need: WiFi, wireless features, multi-GPU support, ECC memory, surround sound, remote-control access via a smartphone or tablet.
So should I look for a low end mobo that is fast at stock clock speed and has dual monitor support? My only concern is that a cheaper mobo will not run as fast at stock speeds as a better quality mobo.



You may not need SLI or Crossfire.  However, it maybe worthwhile to have two separate cards vs one card supporting two monitors.

I have not tried the latest cards.  My experience is that, on WIndows, most single cards cannot be calibrated for two monitors.....either with xRite or Datacolor Spyder. 

I went around and around with this with Datacolor's CD Tobie.  He finally convinced me that two cards are necessary.

Actually, way back, I did have one card that would do this....a Matrox Parhellia.  They had one firmware load which was specifically written to provide the look of two separate cards which would load a LUT for each monitor.

John
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« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2013, 08:33:44 PM »
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One other point about memory.  If you choose something other than the stock cpu cooler make sure you get the low profile memory.  Memory with big fins MIGHT work but its a crapshoot.

Cases...if you can find a Lian LI v1020b, buy it. Its the best case I have ever used and I suspect it will last for a few more builds. might be a few more around if you search.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811112308



Absolutely.  This is the best mid-tower case available from most any perspective, build materials and quality, design, cooling capability, and I dare say it looks nice.   Lian li makes newer products, and they maintain their legacy products, but the V1020 hits that sweet spot. 

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« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2013, 11:37:14 PM »
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However, if video isn't a big thing, but only a sporadic activity, you don't need a graphics card. The HD 4000 supports H.264 and MPEG-2 natively, with hardware acceleration for playback.

+1 - we've been building a bunch of these for Dental Operatory and Exam Room applications, Z77 chipset.  I'm quite impressed with HD 4000 performance, handily meeting or exceeding $200-300 video cards of only 2-3 years ago....

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« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2013, 09:39:54 AM »
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  I'm quite impressed with HD 4000 performance, handily meeting or exceeding $200-300 video cards of only 2-3 years ago....
Thanks for this assessment. It looks like I will do what was unthinkable in my mind a week ago: build a photo editing PC without a GPU!!  Grin
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« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2013, 09:44:52 AM »
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You may not need SLI or Crossfire.  However, it maybe worthwhile to have two separate cards vs one card supporting two monitors.

I have not tried the latest cards.  My experience is that, on WIndows, most single cards cannot be calibrated for two monitors.....either with xRite or Datacolor Spyder. 
Looks like I won't need SLI or Crossfire mobo as i will try it first with NO GPU. I only need one of my monitors to calibrate. The other one will just hold the tools palette.
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« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2013, 10:10:56 AM »
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So the question of motherboard still remains. How do i determine which is the best one?

Since I won't be overclocking I'd love to pick the fastest one at stock speeds at rendering RAWs with LR .

I've read a ton of mobo reviews and since they are geared for enthusiasts they usually revolve around how easy they are to achieve greater overclock speeds. And many of the benchmarking results are with games and 3D rendering which won't apply for me. And do I care about zip compression tests?

Is there a specific benchmark test that most closely mimics RAW rendering in LR that can help me decide which mobo is best for me?

Or am I obsessing about nothing? Are speeds so relatively similar that only measurebators care? (i.e. speeds in real world experience would not be noticeable.

I see a few excellent priced ASUS and Gigabyte boards (like ASUS P8Z77-V LX and Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H) that lack the bells and whistles that I don't need (SLI/Crossfire, WiFi or Bluetooth) but how can I tell which of these best renders RAW files in LR?
And will they do as good a job as an ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 or a Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP5 TH at stock speeds?

Though I'd like to avoid paying for a mobo that has features I don't need, I am not poor and can easily afford a mobo with these features if they will run faster than the budget mobos

Or do they all run at close to the same speed at stock clock and I should base my choice on colour or cool sounding name? Shocked
« Last Edit: April 24, 2013, 12:03:02 PM by Philmar » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2013, 11:07:54 AM »
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So the question of motherboard still remains. How do i determine which is the best one?

Since I won't be overclocking I'd love to pick the fastest one at stock speeds at rendering RAWs with LR .

I've read a ton of mobo reviews and since they are geared for enthusiasts they usually revolve around how easy they are to achieve greater overclock speeds. And many of the benchmarking results are with games and 3D rendering which won't apply for me. And do I care about zip compression tests?

Is there a specific benchmark test that most closely mimics RAW rendering in LR that can help me decide which mobo is best for me?

Or am I obsessing about nothing? Are speeds so relatively similar that only measurebators care? (i.e. speeds in real world experience would not be noticeable.

I see a few excellent priced ASUS and Gigabyte boards (like ASUS P8Z77-V LX and Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H) that lack the bells and whistles that I don't need (SLI/Crossfire, WiFi or Bluetooth) but how can I tell which of these best renders RAW files in LR?
And will they do as good a job as an ASUS SABERTOOTH Z77 or a Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP5 TH at stock speeds?

Though i'd like to avoid paying for a mobo that has features I don't need, I am not poor and can easily afford a mobo with these features if they will run faster than the budget mobos

Or do they all run at close to the same speed at stock clock that i should base my choice on colour or cool sounding name? Shocked

I just bought a Gigabyte z77xUD3H for my nephews first build.  Its a very nice board, and it was perfect out of the box.  I got a geekbench of 7900 using a i3 dual core.

I also have the z77xUP5TH in my workstation and it too is a great board.  I think you will do fine either way.

I don't run Lightroom so I can't be much help in that regard.
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« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2013, 11:41:01 AM »
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This build is for photo editing with Lightroom and Photoshop CS3. I probably will start to use the video capabilities of my Canon 5D3. This is what I have so far. The power supply, CPU cooler will sort themselves out later.

CPU - Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core
SSD - Samsung 840 Pro Series 240 GB
HD disks - 2 x WD Green (WD30EZRX) 3TB
Case - Antec P280

What I really need help with is the mobo, memory and video card.

This is somewhat off topic, but you might want to consider other configurations. The Apple MacPro line is used by most of the photo gurus and you might want to duplicate what has been found to be highly functional in the Apple machines.

Here is one suggestion. Note that the post is nearly a year old and that the Mac Pro line is rumored to be updated soon. Some of our hardware gurus could offer updated suggestions.

Regards,

Bill
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« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2013, 12:11:45 PM »
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Thanks bill. Every time i upgrade i always look at Apple. I usually conclude that I can find a custom PC that fits my needs cheaper.
And usually I conclude that I am lazy and not in the mood to learn a new OS....however since I may be going with Windoze 8 on the new rig I can't make that argument this time. Cheesy
Guess i'm just comfortable with Windoze now. Never have virus problems, driver issues ect. This is a hobby and I don't have a need for RAID or NAS so Windoze works for me.
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