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Author Topic: Loss of detail in tulip photos - advice?  (Read 4256 times)
bjanes
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« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2013, 11:15:03 AM »
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Hi,

RawTherapee also has an optional Raw histogram, and it allows to adjust the WhiteBalance induced clipping before it happens.

Good question. Maybe they deemed it to geeky for the majority of their target audience?

Cheers,
Bart

Bart,

You posted while I was finalizing my post about Rawtherapee, so sorry for the duplication. As to the last point, all they would have to do to avoid unnecessary complication for less experienced users would be to include a small icon to invoke the raw histogram as shown below for RT. This would avoid many trips to RawDigger for more experienced users.

Bill
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2013, 12:43:18 PM »
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Bart,

You posted while I was finalizing my post about Rawtherapee, so sorry for the duplication. As to the last point, all they would have to do to avoid unnecessary complication for less experienced users would be to include a small icon to invoke the raw histogram as shown below for RT. This would avoid many trips to RawDigger for more experienced users.

Hi Bill,

No problem, we just expressed a similar thought.

I agree that it shouldn't be too difficult, but I also know that sometimes simple things can be complex to program. Anyway, let's hope Adobe is paying attention. The RawTherapee implementation doesn't create too much clutter, it's a toggle, so that can't be what's holding them back.

Cheers,
Bart
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Tim Lookingbill
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« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2013, 01:20:00 PM »
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Yes, a Raw source histogram of the data would be great to have in ACR/LR but it still doesn't address Andrew's points about color gamut mapping distinctions with regard primarily to certain hues between what the camera captured and what the display can or can't deliver.

A 3D gamut source model would be even more helpful. My Pentax K100D DSLR can't capture certain intense cyans that I know my sRGB-ish monitor can easily reproduce demonstrated in Photoshop's Color Picker in the ProPhotoRGB working space. I'ld have to use Replace Color and similar editing tools and artificially drop it in a selection in Photoshop. BIG PITA.

Another problem is that what we see (for instance intense cyan in a real scene) is changed due to the surround within the scene from the adaptive nature of our eyes to WB perception that the camera hasn't a clue about. Change/adjust WB at capture you just reduced?/changed? the gamut of that scene in the way certain hues are rendered in post. Kinda' along the lines of calibrating your display with a 6500K native WB to 5000K thus reducing its gamut.

Having these gamut analysis tools of the actual Raw data along with the source histogram might prevent photographers from chasing a hue that's not really there or captured by the camera or be able to see on a display.

I've performed custom WB to sunset lit flowers scenes that severely made the scene look cool whose detail still got turned to posterized blobs requiring edits similar to what I posted above on the jpeg.
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bjanes
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« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2013, 05:10:27 PM »
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Yes, a Raw source histogram of the data would be great to have in ACR/LR but it still doesn't address Andrew's points about color gamut mapping distinctions with regard primarily to certain hues between what the camera captured and what the display can or can't deliver.

A 3D gamut source model would be even more helpful. My Pentax K100D DSLR can't capture certain intense cyans that I know my sRGB-ish monitor can easily reproduce demonstrated in Photoshop's Color Picker in the ProPhotoRGB working space. I'ld have to use Replace Color and similar editing tools and artificially drop it in a selection in Photoshop. BIG PITA.

Another problem is that what we see (for instance intense cyan in a real scene) is changed due to the surround within the scene from the adaptive nature of our eyes to WB perception that the camera hasn't a clue about. Change/adjust WB at capture you just reduced?/changed? the gamut of that scene in the way certain hues are rendered in post. Kinda' along the lines of calibrating your display with a 6500K native WB to 5000K thus reducing its gamut.

Having these gamut analysis tools of the actual Raw data along with the source histogram might prevent photographers from chasing a hue that's not really there or captured by the camera or be able to see on a display.

I've performed custom WB to sunset lit flowers scenes that severely made the scene look cool whose detail still got turned to posterized blobs requiring edits similar to what I posted above on the jpeg.

Dream on. You want Lightroom to include the functionality of Colorthink Pro and also some type of color appearance model, perhaps similar to the CIECAM02 plugin for Photoshop (32 bit only)?. Shown is a screen capture. Unfortunately, I don't know how to use it, but perhaps someone can post some pointers.

Regards,

Bill
« Last Edit: April 25, 2013, 05:13:00 PM by bjanes » Logged
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