Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: They say you shouldn't shoot straight into the sun...  (Read 3798 times)
fike
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1373


Hiker Photographer


WWW
« on: April 22, 2013, 12:59:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Why?

http://marcshaffer.net/fine-art-panoramics-for-sale/breaking-ice-under-sunny-skies.html

I frequently like to put the sun in my images.  Generally it is broken up by branches or somehow attenuated from its full power, but not this one.  Am I destroying my sensor? My eyes? 
Logged

Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
marcshaffer.net
TrailPixie.net

I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
k bennett
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1417


WWW
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2013, 01:27:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Nope. Not unless you spend a lot of time staring directly at the sun - then it might be a problem for your eyes.

Love the photo. I also like having the sun in the frame.
Logged

Equipment: a camera and some lenses.
Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7789



WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2013, 02:40:21 PM »
ReplyReply

+1.
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
ErikKaffehr
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7234


WWW
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2013, 02:44:28 PM »
ReplyReply

+1

+1.

Logged

Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 1433


« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2013, 02:47:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Not shooting into the sun means lots of good light missed.
Logged
fike
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1373


Hiker Photographer


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2013, 03:13:39 PM »
ReplyReply

So I am buying what you guys are selling. I have recklessly ignored this recommendation to not shoot into the sun.

Why do all the manufacturers tell you not to?  Is it because they are afraid you are going to fry your eyeball with a telephoto lens or something?

Logged

Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
marcshaffer.net
TrailPixie.net

I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 1433


« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 03:27:32 PM »
ReplyReply

I expect it is precisely that. Some numpty will set up a camera, looking directly into the sun, with a dirty great big telephoto, and will stare into it for ages, burn out their retina, then claim compensation from the manufacturer for not warning them that the sun is bright. People who sue a restaurant or cafe 'cos the coffee was very hot & they scalded their tongue, then find an idiot judge who'll grant them millions in damages, they're the ones the camera makers are scared of, and so they tell us stupid things, all to cover their arse.
Logged
snoleoprd
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 393



WWW
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 03:44:27 PM »
ReplyReply

It is precisely because you can blow out your eye. I take pics into the sun but not with long telephotos. What made me be more cautious was I was setting up a small telescope that is much like a camera lens, 500mm focal length, and I do have a solar filter for it, but I wanted to get it pointed at the sun first as it would make it easier to find once the solar filter was attached. I was smart enough not to look at it but I was watching the transmitted image straight out the back of the telescope and it was pointed at my chest, I found the sun and within about 3 seconds I had a smoking hole in my t-shirt and tiny burn just starting on my skin. So yes it can be dangerous, just be cautious. A lens is focusing light.

Alan
Logged

Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA
Simon J.A. Simpson
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 164


« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2013, 03:44:49 PM »
ReplyReply

 Grin

Your should definitely not shoot into the sun.  That's what the instructions for my Canon 5D said.  So I went to Turkey and shot this picture of a total eclipse in 2006.  Oops !  Sorry Canon.

1.3 seconds at f4.0 ISO400.  But, photographically, not my finest hour (image for illustrative rather than aesthetic purposes).   In competition a judge said that the foreground needed a little more light on it (a touch of fill-in flash perhaps ?).  Someone else kindly pointed-out it was an eclipse and thus inclined to be dark(ish).

This was my first experience of shooting digitally.  A tad over ambitious subject perhaps ?  Also, my first experience of a total solar eclipse.  I highly recommend the latter.  Although it didn't change my life it was awe inspriring.  I will never forget it.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2013, 09:33:33 AM by Simon J.A. Simpson » Logged
8x10 user
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 288


« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2013, 04:51:44 PM »
ReplyReply

And dont try to reduce the dangers by using a neutral density filter. They don't filter many of the harmful rays since you eyes will adjust to the lower light level with a bigger pupil the actual amount of dangerous exposure is higher. 
Logged
sunnycal
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 93


WWW
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2013, 07:06:55 PM »
ReplyReply

I shoot with sun in the frame, but I pull my eye a little away from viewfinder so it is not staring at the sun directly. I can usually manage composition with my eye an inch or two away from eyecup, but if composition is wrong, I can always take another (or dozen more) shots.
Logged

Robert DeCandido PhD
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 160


WWW
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2013, 07:43:43 PM »
ReplyReply

http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=10728130

double-click to enlarge...Central Park in the snow
Logged
Tom Montgomery
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 78


WWW
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2013, 07:49:34 PM »
ReplyReply

With rangefinder cameras (and, I suppose, the current mirrorless models), it is very possible to burn the focal plane shutter if aimed at the sun too long. In fact, a local photographer was showing me his patched M4 shutter just the other day. Just focus an image of the sun on a piece of paper with any lens to see how quickly it can happen.
Logged
wildlightphoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 610


« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2013, 09:50:15 PM »
ReplyReply

With rangefinder cameras (and, I suppose, the current mirrorless models), it is very possible to burn the focal plane shutter if aimed at the sun too long. In fact, a local photographer was showing me his patched M4 shutter just the other day. Just focus an image of the sun on a piece of paper with any lens to see how quickly it can happen.

The M4's shutter is rubberized cloth.  A modern shutter is more likely to either warp (metal) or melt (plastic).
Logged
Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 1433


« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2013, 04:03:06 AM »
ReplyReply

All I can say is that it's a good thing no one ever came up with a concept such as contre-jour
Logged
duane_bolland
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


WWW
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2013, 01:28:17 AM »
ReplyReply

And dont try to reduce the dangers by using a neutral density filter. They don't filter many of the harmful rays since you eyes will adjust to the lower light level with a bigger pupil the actual amount of dangerous exposure is higher. 

I'm skeptical.  What "harmful rays" are not reduced by a ND filter? 
Logged
jrsforums
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 722


« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2013, 08:46:40 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm skeptical.  What "harmful rays" are not reduced by a ND filter? 

I am pretty sure that I have read that IR can "push through".  If using a 10stop ND, it is sometimes helpful to also use an IR-cut filter to reduce any influence of the IR.
Logged

John
Gary Brown
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 211


« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2013, 09:34:38 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm skeptical.  What "harmful rays" are not reduced by a ND filter? 

ND filters don't necessarily filter IR and UV. E.g., from this page about a LEE filter:

These glass neutral density filters are optimised for use with digital cameras, as they absorb more infrared and ultraviolet light than traditional ND filters.

Also, from Wikipedia:

Practical ND filters are not perfect, as they do not reduce the intensity of all wavelengths equally. This can sometimes create color casts in recorded images, particularly with inexpensive filters. More significantly, most ND filters are only specified over the visible region of the spectrum, and do not proportionally block all wavelengths of ultraviolet or infrared radiation. This can be dangerous if using ND filters to view sources (such as the sun or white-hot metal or glass) which emit intense non-visible radiation, since the eye may be damaged even though the source does not look bright when viewed through the filter. Special filters must be used if such sources are to be safely viewed.
Logged
Peter McLennan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1660


« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2013, 10:36:35 AM »
ReplyReply

All I can say is that it's a good thing no one ever came up with a concept such as contre-jour

Heh.  Exactly.  Without backlight, we're toast.
Logged
Eddy M
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2013, 01:55:18 AM »
ReplyReply

Because lens flare reducing contrast?  Smiley
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad