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Author Topic: Hahnemuhle Rice Paper  (Read 2192 times)
deanwork
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« on: April 26, 2013, 11:42:49 AM »
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Awhile back Hahnemuhle sent me a sample roll of their new "rice paper".

Does anyone know what this stuff really is? It looks more like some generic alpha matte paper than any Asian made paper I've ever used.

But, it may be appropriate for a book project someone is asking about, in that you can wrap and fold the paper around a 3D element in the book.

Unfortunately their rep doesn't seem to help here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyW25YUnmdY

john
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kdphotography
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« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2013, 12:42:13 PM »
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It's pretty a pretty thin and light media.  I think your description is right on target. Good for printing sumi-e type artwork.  I picked some up on a whim and really haven't used it much. It's certainly not as exotic as it sounds.  100% alpha cellulose matte paper.  100 gsm.
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deanwork
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« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2013, 05:38:51 PM »
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I was always suspect of Asian paper made by Germans ( though I do love some of their fiber gloss offerings.)

Anyway if you want the real thing here it is - http://store.hiromipaper.com/

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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2013, 04:24:38 AM »
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Awagami has some thinner papers, 63-55gsm that may be more suitable for wrapping (Moab sells some of the Awagami papers). Rice paper like HM sells must have its origin in China, I do not think there is any reason to produce that in Germany, China has coating facilities too.

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/distrilinks.htm


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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.
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kdphotography
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2013, 08:31:32 AM »
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.... Rice paper like HM sells must have its origin in China, I do not think there is any reason to produce that in Germany, China has coating facilities too. ....


Like John said, it is more of a generic, albeit thin, alpha cellulose matte paper.  I don't think there is anything particularly "asian" about this rice paper from Hahn.  There's no *ahem* asian mystique.  I guess it's sorta like Hahn saying we don't have to go to China to get Chinese food...We've got a Chinese restaurant right here----in Germany.   Grin
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2013, 09:41:56 AM »
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Like John said, it is more of a generic, albeit thin, alpha cellulose matte paper.  I don't think there is anything particularly "asian" about this rice paper from Hahn.  There's no *ahem* asian mystique.  I guess it's sorta like Hahn saying we don't have to go to China to get Chinese food...We've got a Chinese restaurant right here----in Germany.   Grin

There used to be a Hahnemühle Japon paper for inkjet printing, the same paper was sold by other companies much cheaper as No-Branda in The Netherlands: it was actually a Fire Retardent paper for posters, similar construction as Tyvek. So I am aware that what is called Rice Paper does not have to be Rice Paper. All very true. I have the sample here, it has no Asian flavor. It is a papier vergé - laid paper. That does not imply they make it in Germany. A sample book of Japanse papers that I have contains similar laid paper qualities starting from 35gsm called Kawasa, 70gsm called Hosho, 120gsm called Kaji. Rougher but an inkjet coating usually flattens the texture, the Awagami qualities show that too. True rice paper is often below 40gsm. Anybody in this trade knows papers like that are produced all over Asia; China, Nepal, Tibet, India, etc and sold abroad as "Japanese" if possible. That is why I wrote China as the generic place of production, not to give an Asian or Rice appeal. Most likely much cheaper to produce it there than here in Europe. That Chinese restaurant in Germany buys Chinese products where possible, for the same reason.

Edit; to contradict myself, Hahnemühle has a cotton paper (Echt Bütten) in its non-inkjet art paper catalog, category Specialty Papers, a 75gsm  Programmpapier (code 105724). The vergé pattern of the Programm fits that of the "Rice Paper" but the mesh wire is less visible in the last. Add the inkjet coating and the weight could be close, Color is very similar. Both are in my SpectrumViz list, the Programm paper however measured several layers thick to show the paper white reflection of an unsized, uncoated cotton paper. The "Rice Paper" could be an HM product but it is described as 100 Alpha Cellulose.

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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
December 2012, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 10:38:23 AM by Ernst Dinkla » Logged
deanwork
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« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2013, 10:38:20 AM »
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I didn't mean it was made in Germany, just obviously developed and marketed by a non-asian company. Everyone knows the great Washi papers are Japanese. The difference however is that Hahnemuhle did apply an inkjet receptor coating to theirs. However, it isn't a "rice paper". ( I think they quit making paper from rice about 1,000 years ago when they switched to mulberry and other tree fibers :-) . I just call authentic sheets Kozo or Gampi or whatever it is made from. There is a lot to choose from each with their own unique colors and textures.

In Hahnemuhle's favor their stuff does hold a black density and resolution better than most Kozo papers BUT it still looks like a regular thin alpha paper, so there is nothing  exotic about it. It almost looks like high quality bond typing paper to me.

j

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