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Author Topic: New Printer Epson 2880 or 3000  (Read 2124 times)
nikonuser
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« on: April 27, 2013, 07:32:28 AM »
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I'm in line for a new printer and have been looking at bothe the Epson 2880 and 3000.
I see on the latter the PK and MK ink change is automatic although it uses quite a lot of ink in the process.
I have also heard problems with the 3000 about multiply head cleaning cycles.
Any help from those that have hese printers would be much appreciated
Thanks
Dave


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LarsHansen
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2013, 11:32:14 AM »
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I've been through the exact same considerations and ended up buying the R3000 late december 2012.

Regarding the cleaning cycles - I had the same concerns, but so far I haven't experienced it as a problem though a few cycles have appeared. I triggered a cleaning cycle myself once (by accident..) and I think the issues with excessive cleaning cycles was ascribed to printer driver issues in other posts here on LL - I run Win7 and use Capture One 6.4. On the other hand I should mention that I don't print much and cleaning cycles might be proportional with the amount of printing (would make some sense..).
I've followed some simple recommendations from other members here on LL - I run a Nozzle check regularly and switch the printer off when I'm not actually printing - switching off parks the printer heads and seal them as I understand. Try to search LL posts on these subjects.

The ink waste during the switch between PK and MK - so far I've only used papers that use the PK. When I someday will make prints that utilize the MK I will plan for this - if your printing pattern will require this switch to happen often then it's a problem.

I didn't go for the 2880 due to some reports on the paper feeding mechanism failing for some heavy papers - I've had no issues with my R3000 so far. Also I liked the wireless option so that I don't need a cable in daily use - but note that you will need to wire it up to your pc in some cases (fx driver install). The automatic switch between PK and MK also makes a difference. But you pay for it.

Lars

If you haven't read it, this review is worth reading:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/reviews/printer/epson_r3000.html
    
    
« Last Edit: April 27, 2013, 11:46:32 AM by LarsHansen » Logged
dseelig
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2013, 12:30:04 PM »
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With the ink use I strongly recommend getting a 3880. There is ususally a rebate going on and with the extra ink you get you are not really spending more money and you get a more robust printer.
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Rawcoll
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2013, 12:56:07 PM »
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I didn't go for the 2880 due to some reports on the paper feeding mechanism failing for some heavy papers

Yes, I've found my 2880 can be a real pig loading papers through the rear manual feed slot, with a paper feed error coming up time after time. I use both H.H Gloss Baryta (320 gsm) and Canson Baryta Photographique (310 gsm). Fortunately, neither of these papers is too stiff to go through the normal sheet feeder. If they didn't I think I'd have been forced to move on to the 3000.

Ian
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nikonuser
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2013, 03:13:03 PM »
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Thank you all so much, really appreciate the helpful information.....have read the northlight review.
I would be printing weekly,  doing a weekly nozzle check and switching the printer off between uses so hopefully this should keep the heads clean
I did not kow about the 2880 paper feed issue so thanks for that.
I do need to plan my paper use with the 3000 , as you say, to prevent wasting ink.
My thickest paper I use is Innova Cold Press Rough Textured at 52mm thick would this go through the manual rear feed with the platen gap set to 6mm and wide??
Thanks again
Dave
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mfryd
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2013, 07:08:10 PM »
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If you have the room on your desk, you should think about the 3880.  For most people it costs less to buy and operate a 3880.


The Epson 2880 print engine is normally sold bundled with $100 worth of ink.  B&H sells the bundle for $600 with a $100 rebate.  This works out to about $300 for the 2880 print engine.

The Epson 3880 print engine is normally sold bundled with $450 worth of ink.  B&H sells the bundle for $1,130 less a $250 rebate.  This works out to about $430 for the 3880 print engine.

Ink for the 2880 is about $1.14 per ml.

Ink for the 3880 is about 56 per ml.

With the 3800 you pay $130 more for the print engine, and this cuts your ink costs in half.   


By the time you've gone through the ink that came with your 3880, the the lower ink costs have likely have saved you more than the $130 extra you paid for the printer.




My advice is that when comparing printers you also consider the value of the bundled ink, and the ongoing cost of ink.


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hugowolf
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« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2013, 07:40:56 PM »
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My thickest paper I use is Innova Cold Press Rough Textured at 52mm thick would this go through the manual rear feed with the platen gap set to 6mm and wide??
It is 5.2 mm not 52 mm. 52 mm is more than 2 inches. Innova suggest using the Watercolor paper media setting on Epson printers.

Brian A
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2013, 02:29:29 AM »
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you should think about the 3880. 
+1
The argument for ink costs alone is compelling, but the 38xx series have a great reputation for reliability too and you'll be able to make bigger prints if you want to.

A friend of mine wishes he'd listened to that advice from me two years ago, as his R3000 has just had the print head fail after 26 months Sad
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nikonuser
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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2013, 02:39:56 AM »
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Thanks for the correction, Brian, no printer could cope with that thickness of paper!!
I would consider the 3880 but here in the UK the cheapest I could get it for is 959 and it does not come bundled with any offers.
If, or when I go for the 3000 I would use refillable carts.
Another query please if I may, when you do a nozzle check on te 3000 I understand that it will only do it for the PK or MK chosen so should you really do 2 nozzle check to cover each one or alternate each week.
Thanks all
Dave
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2013, 02:49:25 AM »
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If, or when I go for the 3000 I would use refillable carts.
Why ? you'll just throw away all the advantages of the Epson inkset and add the cost of needing custom profile(s).
I've read of so many problems with refilling ink carts/CIS systems it seems a risky strategy to use on a new printer. Especially since the R3000 hasn't exactly a faultless record for reliability.

Really...go and do the sums on a 3880.
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nikonuser
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« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2013, 06:13:53 AM »
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Thanks, it's an interesting thought but at 959 for the printer and then 47 per cartridge it is way out of my price range for the amount of printing I do as an amateur.
Epson R3000 with a set of refillable cartridges is 685 including 70mls of each of the 9 inks and then a full set of 900ml inks is 138.
Thanks anyway.
Dave
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 06:20:52 AM by nikonuser » Logged
LarsHansen
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« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2013, 06:27:52 AM »
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I haven't done any nozzle checks with the MK in place - I'm not sure it makes sense and maybe someone else can answer. My guess is that either the MK or PK is always decoupled from the print head/nozzle  - I might be wrong and I'm not a printer techie.

I actually considered if it was a mistake I opened the MK and placed it in the printer because I'm not going to use it until .. who knows. Whether the printer will accept that no cartridge is mounted in the MK slot I don't know.

Regarding the 3880 - I also (re)considered before buying based on these recommendations. The ink math alone is a good argument.
Just a side note - I don't know how much practical influence it has, but the  droplet sizes are different between 3880 and 3000 - the 3000's being smaller. If you don't print larger than A3+?
Like Dave, the price tag on the 3880 was simply too high for me - the R3000 was already over my budget and I'm not going to print much. I've also considered trying fx Cone inks for my R3000 - I know there is a risk involved and the paper profiles could become an issue.  
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nikonuser
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« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2013, 07:02:15 AM »
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Thanks, Lars, appreciate your additional comments.
I know someone else who never uses the MK ink I think they do it by profiling all their papers so that MK is not chosen through the printer driver??
I have just purchased Colormunki Photo to profile my monitor and create paper profiles so will see how I go with this side of printing.
Thanks again and appreciate your experience with the 3000
Dave
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Sal Baker
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« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2013, 08:17:46 AM »
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The 3880 has been proven to be Epson's most reliable, cost effective pro printer.  At least if you go by years of positive posts in photo forums.  If you don't print often it's the only choice IMO.

When used for occasional prints the original inks will last at least 3 years.  I have a few carts in my 3880 that are over 3 years old.   The 3880 has a well deserved reputation for never clogging, even when not used for long periods of time.  I had one clog over 3 years ago caused by switching to mk ink.  I'm happy to stick with pk ink and have never had a clog since then.  I don't even bother with nozzle checks anymore even though I have gone weeks/months between printing sessions.

The 3000 has a less stellar reputation and with smaller carts and more frequent head cleanings you will most likely need to buy new carts many times in the next 3 years while the 3880 will just keep working with the original set.

As to print quality, the 3880 makes stellar exhibition quality prints.  I'm preparing a 25 piece show of large prints for a local gallery.  Unless one is in to using microscopes there's no visual difference between the output of any current pro printers including Canon. 

I'm thinking very seriously about getting another 3880 just for mk printing.

Sal
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hugowolf
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« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2013, 08:26:31 AM »
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Another query please if I may, when you do a nozzle check on te 3000 I understand that it will only do it for the PK or MK chosen so should you really do 2 nozzle check to cover each one or alternate each week.
No just one nozzle check. The PK and MK inks share nozzles. If a nozzle is not clogged, it isn't colgged. Anyhow, to do a PK nozzle check and then a MK nozzle check, you would have to do an expensive PK/MK switch.

Do nozzle check any time you do a switch.

Brian A
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nikonuser
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« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2013, 08:58:01 AM »
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Thanks, Brian, for the clarification.
Sal, when you say that you only use the PK ink  could you explain why please and by doing so are you only using papers that are specific to PK.....gloss; lustre etc.
What do you do when you want to print on fine art paper.
Thanks
Dave
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 09:00:37 AM by nikonuser » Logged
Sal Baker
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« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2013, 09:29:04 AM »
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Thanks, Brian, for the clarification.
Sal, when you say that you only use the PK ink  could you explain why please and by doing so are you only using papers that are specific to PK.....gloss; lustre etc.
What do you do when you want to print on fine art paper.
Thanks
Dave


I simply prefer the color rendering and great d-max on luster papers vs. matte papers.  I've pretty much settled in on using Canson Baryta Photographique and Canson Platine.  They are both beautiful luster papers that use pk in their profiles.  The printer never switches to mk as pk is the default black.

Sal
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 09:31:39 AM by Sal Baker » Logged
nikonuser
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« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2013, 10:07:27 AM »
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The printer never switches to mk as pk is the default black.

So does the MK ink never dry out or create any issues by not being used.
Funny enough I have a desk full of paper at the moment and those 2 Canson papers you mention are the ones I'm thinking of sticking with.
Thanks for your time in helping a newbie!!
Dave
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Sal Baker
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« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2013, 10:19:58 AM »
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So does the MK ink never dry out or create any issues by not being used.
Funny enough I have a desk full of paper at the moment and those 2 Canson papers you mention are the ones I'm thinking of sticking with.
Thanks for your time in helping a newbie!!
Dave

The mk cart has been sitting in the printer unused for 3 years with no problems.  I recently replaced some carts that had been in the printer almost that long and they were still fine until they finally ran out.  I think keeping the printer covered when off has really helped.

Sal
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nikonuser
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« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2013, 10:46:02 AM »
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Thank you for your replies and quick responses
Dave
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