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Author Topic: Adjustment brush basic question LR 4  (Read 2178 times)
Paul2660
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« on: May 04, 2013, 12:11:26 PM »
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Sorry to have to ask this, but I have looked to no avail.

If I have one adjustment brush already created, adjustments made, then go to another part of an image and open a new adjustment brush, it always picks up the settings from the previous brush, this also true with the ND filter.  Is there a setting in LR, to tell it that with each newly created adjustment brush or ND filter that I want all the settings to go back to their defaults? or some area to click to do this.  Right now, the only way I can do it is manually return them to zero.  If I hit new, it just seems to create yet another brush.

Also, when I create my 1st adjustment brush on a new image, it will always start with the settings that were used last, (last image or last time I had LR open).


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Paul Caldwell
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Paul Caldwell
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Glenn NK
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« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2013, 01:05:33 PM »
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Not that I'm aware of.

I'm always having to adjust the Temp and Tint sliders to neutral.

Having said that, it's my understanding that the Temp and Tint sliders in the brush are modifications from the global Temp/Tint settings of the image.  Can anyone confirm this?

Glenn
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Rand47
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« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2013, 01:54:49 PM »
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If you are setting "each slider" back to zero individually, you can speed things up a bit by double-clicking on the "Effect:" in the upper left hand corner of the pane.  That will reset all sliders at once.

Rand
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aduke
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« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2013, 04:06:46 PM »
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If you select the adjustment brush and then, before you've set a point, reset the sliders to zero or where-ever you want the defaults, and then open a new adjustment, that adjustment's sliders will start out at zero or where-ever. After building the mask, if you click "new", the sliders will again reset to zero.

I believe that the sliders will retain their default settings until you change the settings without having an open adjustment. Cool

Alan
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2013, 04:22:42 PM »
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... I want all the settings to go back to their defaults?...

Not sure I understand the need for this.

If by defaults you mean zero, and you seem to manually return them to zero as well, you do not really need a brush with zero settings. You want a brush with certain, non-zero, settings, right? If so, why does it matter if you move, say Exposure, from +25 to -33, or if you find it zeroed and then move it to -33. You have to move the slider in any case. Or I am missing something?
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Paul2660
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2013, 05:03:37 PM »
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The way I work an image, one brush may be for increasing exposure in a image, next brush will be to decrease exposure in another part.  The way things work now, without starting at zero, the brush will start to draw increasing exposure (from the previous brush) and thus it overexposes now.  I realize I can move it back manually, but you have a lot of sliders in the brush, and it's easy  (at least for me) to forget I had increased sharping, reduced noise, etc. and this gets carried over to the next brush. 

I would much rather have the new brush starting at base line zero just like the main adjustments panel does.  Just my workflow I guess. 

Minor nit, just find it interesting you can't have a setting so it's zero'd out. 

Rand47, I will try hitting the effects button and see if that works better, thanks for the suggestion.

Paul
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Paul Caldwell
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2013, 06:08:37 PM »
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How about creating a single preset with all adjustments zeroed and saving it? That way a new brush will always start with everything zeroed.
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Alistair
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« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2013, 10:18:55 PM »
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Sorry to have to ask this, but I have looked to no avail.

If I have one adjustment brush already created, adjustments made, then go to another part of an image and open a new adjustment brush, it always picks up the settings from the previous brush, this also true with the ND filter.  Is there a setting in LR, to tell it that with each newly created adjustment brush or ND filter that I want all the settings to go back to their defaults? or some area to click to do this.  Right now, the only way I can do it is manually return them to zero.  If I hit new, it just seems to create yet another brush.

Also, when I create my 1st adjustment brush on a new image, it will always start with the settings that were used last, (last image or last time I had LR open).


Thanks
Paul Caldwell


It does not work quite in the way you assume. Rather than simply always use the last settings in place on closing the tool, it uses the last settings that were used when the adjustment tool was last opened AFTER THE FIRST BRUSH STROKE (OR GRADIENT) IS MADE. So if you want to always open with zero/default settings, reset all settings to default/zero and from then on always make a brush stroke before altering any settings.

So the method I would use to achieve what you are wanting is to firstly reset all settings to default and then close the tool BEFORE making any brush strokes. Then reopen the tool and make a few (or only one) of the required brush strokes BEFORE altering any settings. You can see your brush strokes by pressing O if you want to.  Once the first brush stroke is made, proceed with your adjustments and further strokes. When you close the tool and reopen again. you will find it opens at the default settings rather than your last used settings.

So you are making the first stroke of your mask and THEN applying the adjustments to it.

Hope this is of some help.
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Paul2660
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« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2013, 10:42:04 PM »
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Alistair,

Thanks for the info, I will try this next time.

Slobodan,

By preset, create a brush preset that is zeroed out?  that is a good idea, I didn't realize you can make adjustment brush presets. 

Thanks to all
Paul
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Paul Caldwell
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2013, 12:52:59 AM »
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Paul: If you have the Brush tool open, beside 'Effect:' there will be a name of some sort and then a double arrow.  Click on the arrow and it will show you the current brush presets.  If you scroll down to the bottom of the list there is a 'Save Current Settings as a New Preset' option.  More here: http://bit.ly/LRPreset

Mike.
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Glenn NK
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« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2013, 11:00:51 AM »
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Not sure I understand the need for this.

If by defaults you mean zero, and you seem to manually return them to zero as well, you do not really need a brush with zero settings. You want a brush with certain, non-zero, settings, right? If so, why does it matter if you move, say Exposure, from +25 to -33, or if you find it zeroed and then move it to -33. You have to move the slider in any case. Or I am missing something?

Seems reasonable to me.

After brushing an area, I virtually always play around with the sliders to achieve the desired effect, so where they start from isn't terribly important (except that the Temp/Tint ones are always in the wrong place  Grin).

Just read Mike's post - I'd better look at this.

Glenn
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Paul2660
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« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2013, 09:38:20 AM »
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Mike:

Thanks, that got it.  I totally overlooked that part of the tool.

Paul Caldwell
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Paul Caldwell
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John Caldwell
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« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2013, 07:55:05 PM »
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Alistair,

Thanks for the info, I will try this next time.

Slobodan,

By preset, create a brush preset that is zeroed out?  that is a good idea, I didn't realize you can make adjustment brush presets.  

Thanks to all
Paul

My "top" brush preset is called "-Reset" and this is a means of starting from a null point. Not uncommonly, I paint a mask in with this "empty" brush called "Reset", zoom out so I can can a context view, and only then do I twiddle the sliders. For me, this can be a good technique for some, but by no means all, adjustments. The Reset can also be accomplished by double-clicking Effect, as has already been mentioned above.

Paul: Brush Presets are the way to go. I have many, probably 30, brush presets saved and descriptively named. I share them between catalogs, so they are "always there".

Cheers,

John-
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