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Author Topic: Making photo biz cards?  (Read 855 times)
iluvmycam
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« on: May 11, 2013, 09:19:38 AM »
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I'd like to make some photo biz cards. Can be slightly bigger size. How did you go about doing it yourself?
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PeterAit
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2013, 12:22:24 PM »
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Unless you have endless spare hours, don't try to do it yourself. I used Moo, it was very reasonable and the results were great.
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Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
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mstevensphoto
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2013, 09:54:53 AM »
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there are so many good and inexpensive online printers that I'd never consider doing it myself. moo.com for standard sizes or mini, printrunner for standard or get a custom quote for a custom size. overnight prints is pretty ok too.
look for trading card printers if you insist on having something bigger. I get the "stand out in a crowd" idea, but I quickly abandoned non-standard sizes after watching people get annoyed with where to put it once given to them.
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iluvmycam
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2013, 11:46:08 AM »
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Yes, 'fit' is a concern.
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PeterAit
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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2013, 11:51:41 AM »
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Yes, 'fit' is a concern.

If someone gave me truly fantastic, beautiful, creative business card then they might get my business - if I needed business cards.
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Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
marcmccalmont
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« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2013, 02:01:12 AM »
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When I was running my loudspeaker business I was on a shoe string budget. I read the book "gorilla marketing" one point that they made, on business cards, was to utilize the back side of the card to display your product.....cheap advertising. so I did, printing a line drawing of one of my speakers on the back. One of the problems doing it yourself is you cant print "raised ink" which is a sign of a high quality card. I'd do the design yourself with a classy professional raised ink front and one of your "stunning" photographs on the back. The photo needs to be strong so it will have impact as a tiny print. as an example this is the photo on the back of my current "personal" business card. Let one of the good local printers do the printing!
Marc
« Last Edit: May 18, 2013, 02:50:08 AM by marcmccalmont » Logged

Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2013, 07:20:17 AM »
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Raised print isn't the thing it used to be.  It's considered dated.  Varnished graphics are, apparently, the in thing.  Problem is, those too will be dated in a few years.

My business cards are square and made of heavy mat board that I cut myself using a mat cutter.  I bought a customised stamp with all the relevant information and simply stamp onto the cut pieces of mat board.  Anyone I've ever given the cards to takes a little longer to look at it because it's different.  The weight of the stock gives it substance and a presence that ordinary business cards don't have.  The fact that it's square also makes it stand out.  It's the same dimension as the short side of a standard card so it still fits in a business card holder.
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