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Author Topic: When will we have the Canon D800e?  (Read 6902 times)
marcmccalmont
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« Reply #40 on: May 15, 2013, 09:43:23 AM »
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"I hear your pain brother" I was ready for a 5DIII but went for the D800E due to it's better sensor. What to do about the lenses? For landscapes manual focus is fine so I invested in Leica R lenses modified them with Leitax Nikkor mounts. So now I can use them directly on my D800E or with an adapter on my 5DII. So I future proofed my lens investment, they can be used on a Nikon,Canon or Sony
Marc
What about the ultra-wide or tilt-shift side of things?
I pack my IQ180/Cambo WRS for the wide shots (tilt/swing on the lenses) and the D800E with Leicas for the longer shots. It all fits nicely in my backpack except the Leica 280 f4
Rodenstock 40,70 and 105mm, Leica 21-35, 28-90 and 80-200
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
Ludwig Nobel
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« Reply #41 on: May 15, 2013, 11:35:32 AM »
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I pack my IQ180/Cambo WRS for the wide shots (tilt/swing on the lenses) and the D800E with Leicas for the longer shots. It all fits nicely in my backpack except the Leica 280 f4
Rodenstock 40,70 and 105mm, Leica 21-35, 28-90 and 80-200
Marc

You have one problem: you are still left with the decision whether to drive to your location with your Ferrari or your Bentley...
Sorry, couldn't resist.

Ludwig
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Petrus
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« Reply #42 on: May 15, 2013, 11:50:10 AM »
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You have one problem: you are still left with the decision whether to drive to your location with your Ferrari or your Bentley...
Sorry, couldn't resist.

We are talking about landscape photography here, so there is also the Lamborghini LM002.
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NancyP
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« Reply #43 on: May 15, 2013, 05:25:13 PM »
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Surely the Lamborghini will have trouble on those dirt roads.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #44 on: May 15, 2013, 08:21:31 PM »
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Surely the Lamborghini will have trouble on those dirt roads.
I don't think so: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamborghini_LM002

BTW Lamborghini started out as a tractor manufacturer. Its founder was legendarily insulted by Ferrari and that's why they now make high end motor cars.
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Ellis Vener
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #45 on: May 15, 2013, 08:26:11 PM »
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I would like to buy the Nikon D800e, but have a lot of Canon-lenses.
I am hoping for a Canon "D800".

Will it come soon, or is it time to sell and go to Nikon?

Henrik
To get to the photo receptor (pixel) density of the D800 Canon will have to come up with a back illuminated CMOS chip design similar to what is used in the D800 (photo receptors on one side (the backside) and the supporting circuits and processors on the front side.  My understanding is that Sony owns the patent for that CMOS design  and either fabricates CMOS to Nikon's spec or licenses the the design to Nikon.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
marcmccalmont
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« Reply #46 on: May 15, 2013, 09:28:23 PM »
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You have one problem: you are still left with the decision whether to drive to your location with your Ferrari or your Bentley...
Sorry, couldn't resist.

Ludwig
Actually it's a 1995 Ford Explorer because it was either a new car or a great camera, so for me it's the great camera!
Cheers
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #47 on: May 16, 2013, 03:55:20 AM »
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To get to the photo receptor (pixel) density of the D800 Canon will have to come up with a back illuminated CMOS chip design similar to what is used in the D800 (photo receptors on one side (the backside) and the supporting circuits and processors on the front side.  My understanding is that Sony owns the patent for that CMOS design  and either fabricates CMOS to Nikon's spec or licenses the the design to Nikon.

Recent Nikon sensors have been manufactured by Toshiba it seems, yet they are delivering a similar level of DR. It could be that Nikon leveraged some Sony technology in their design and had them manufactured by Toshiba but it could also mean that the technology is not a Sony exclusive.

But the "problem" with Canon may be similar to what we had at Nikon 6-7 years ago, meaning an internal deadlock resulting from some key stakeholders just not being seriously interested in tackling an issue. It seems that until the D3 design started, some key Nikon folks were simply convinced that the D2x had good enough high ISO image quality and that it was not needed to go higher since film was anyway not as good already.

I hope I am wrong, but based on the external communication of Canon, I am not sure they are really aligned with the view that the 5DIII/1DX is very far behind in sensor technology compared to the D800.

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: May 16, 2013, 03:57:39 AM by BernardLanguillier » Logged

A few images online here!
BJL
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« Reply #48 on: May 16, 2013, 09:08:11 AM »
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To get to the photo receptor (pixel) density of the D800 Canon will have to come up with a back illuminated CMOS chip design similar to what is used in the D800 (photo receptors on one side (the backside) ...  My understanding is that Sony owns the patent for that CMOS design ...
Wrong on both counts.

First, the improved DR and such of recent sensors used by Sony, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic and Leica are due to using on-chip analog-to-digital conversion, in particular the "column-parallel" approach with ADCs at the bottom of each column of photosites. I have seen no indication that any of these sensors use back-illumination, which seems only to be used and useful with the far smaller photosites of sensors for phones and small compact cameras.

Second, neither the on-chip column parallel ADC nor back-ilumination are exclusive to Sony, even if Sony has patents on some approaches to each technology and puts our more press releases about them than other sensor makers. For example, Samsung, Panasonic, and CMOSIS is all makes sensors using column parallel ADC, and multiple companies use back illumination in some smaller sensors (though no sensor maker does so in any "SLR sized" sensors.)

In short: it is not that Sony is unique in having this new generation of sensor technology, but that Canon is (almost) unique in not yet using it.

P. S. comments from CMOSIS on its use of both these technologies:
http://www.cmosis.com/technology_main/technology

A Panasonic sensor with column-parallel ADC, the MN34070 (used in the GH2):
http://www.semicon.panasonic.co.jp/en/support/catalogs/pdf/T12013CE.pdf

And one from Aptina, who Nikon has worked with for Nikon One system sensors: http://www.aptina.com/assets/downloadDocument.do?id=498
« Last Edit: May 16, 2013, 09:58:14 AM by BJL » Logged
ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #49 on: May 18, 2013, 10:06:59 AM »
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Hi,

I guess the 1995 Ford Explorer makes the job,probably as reliably as the Lambo.

Myself I drive a 2006 Toyota RAV 4...

Best regards
Erik


Actually it's a 1995 Ford Explorer because it was either a new car or a great camera, so for me it's the great camera!
Cheers
Marc
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DaveCurtis
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« Reply #50 on: May 18, 2013, 04:13:29 PM »
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BJL, do you know if Fuji uses on-chip column parallel ADC ?
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BJL
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« Reply #51 on: May 19, 2013, 11:44:25 PM »
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BJL, do you know if Fuji uses on-chip column parallel ADC ?
I don't know, and have seen no comment on any technical details except the unusual CFA.
I have seen speculation that Fujifilm is putting its custom CFA on a Sony sensor, which would make the answer "yes". Maybe we will get a clue from dynamic range and noise testing.
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