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Author Topic: Scanner Profiling Comparisons: i1Profiler1.4.2 vs SilverFast8 IT8Cal vs i1Match3  (Read 7382 times)
Schewe
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« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2013, 05:05:50 PM »
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The HutchColor target has a wider gamut as I understand it but relies on the usual 3 photo dyes.

Yes, but as they are made on Fuji Velvia the added gamut really helps when making profiles for film scanners. Kodak's old Q60 targets ended up deflating the gamut of the resulting profile.
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darlingm
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« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2013, 01:19:30 AM »
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Those who know for sure can't say but you can read between the lines on my posts. :-]

I still don't get why ProfileMaker has more flexibility.  Think they'd have the source code around still...
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Mike Westland Printworks
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2013, 05:38:49 AM »
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Yes, but as they are made on Fuji Velvia the added gamut really helps when making profiles for film scanners. Kodak's old Q60 targets ended up deflating the gamut of the resulting profile.

Velvia ..., I got the impression that it was about (Camera) reflection targets, in this thread and in the link I gave for the targets specifications/measured data. There is a difference between the HutchColor Fuji and Kodak IT8 reflective targets, where the gamuts shift a bit to one another, the Fuji has a wider dynamic range and the Kodak has a more neutral base

That the HutchColor target adds in covering the scanner gamut is an advantage, I do not disagree. Both for film and photo scanning but less usable for non-chromogenic dye originals like watercolor - gouache - acrylic paintings etc. So I think that X-rite has a point in their statement that the CCSG target is not for scanners but for cameras given the higher number of pigments used in that target. Though they could have added that they see scanner spectral sensitivity in general aimed at photo scanning (and film) and most scanners are like that. But not all like I showed in another link. If this thread has the intention to show what the best calibration could be for a photo/film scanner then the use of the HutchColor film/photo targets would be an improvement. I am more interested in non-photo reflective scanning.

The other thread about Passport CC dual illumination profiles for camera RAW developers has some analogy with the the dual light system of the HP G4010/G4050 scanner that copes better with non-photo reflective originals. I got the HP G4010 working on an XP system, horrible HP software as usual and compared to the Epson 3200 (Epson driver + its OEM ICC profiles included) it does a better color fidelity job on a variety of silkscreen ink sampling sheets, watercolor art, inkjet prints. Better at separating primrose/golden yellow but slightly worse on the red tonalities, on the rest of the hues better, much better on gold samples, fluorescent colors but failing on silver in another way than the Epson did.  It is very slow though. The theory that the metameric failures between two illumination conditions nail the colors better than with one illumination condition seems to be correct. It would not surprise me if the dual illumination DNG profile has that effect too for similar reasons. Which would raise the question how one could improve upon that with a target with more basic pigments than the passport target has for camera DNG profiles.

Doing a dual illumination DNG profiling job for the G4010 scanner would ask for way more (software and/or hardware) hacking. An extra custom ICC profile on top may or may not improve upon the HP engineer's work done. The G4010 scanner at least activates fluorescents so in that case UV-enabled is sensible. Given the way the G4010 copes with fluorescents I could add samples of them too but the Eye 1 Pro may activate them differently than the two CCFL's of the scanner do. ArgyllCMS allows the creation and use of custom targets with multiple pigments for ICC profiling but it is a lot of work.

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