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Author Topic: using laminate mounted photo plaques?  (Read 5859 times)
jnmoore
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« on: May 16, 2013, 12:17:13 AM »
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I don't like glass glare and am trying to move to something else. Canvas is OK but I don't like the texture for my work. I've tried some aluminum prints and got a few beautiful ones from Image Wizards but big ones are not cheap.

I'm now looking into the laminating and mounting possibilities and now considering "plaques" which are photos laminated and mounted on composite wood and the the edges beveled and painted, a framing hole on back so ready to go. There are various styles like boxes on the back that give a floating look. I recently printed, as a test, an A2 sheet on my Epson using the Moab Metallic paper and had it traditionally laminated then dry mounted to foam core. There was some reduction in the metallic look but not much!

Costco in Canada has a very well priced plaque service and the prints can be any size you want. You are charged by the sq. inch. Also, you can bring in your own print to use. I'm thinking of joining Costco to give it a try but was wondering what others have done plaques and how has the quality turned out?

Right now I'm buying my frames, mat and foam core in batches of 5 from the Matchop.ca and the prices are not bad but I still have to buy the glass, do the framing and I'd rather be shooting or doing post.

Thanks, John
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theguywitha645d
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2013, 11:03:21 AM »
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If you want to kill a document, laminate it. The adhesive will destroy it.

Why do you need glass? Why not simply frame it?
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jnmoore
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2013, 02:25:28 PM »
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Hi,

Can you explain the "destroy" comment. I've been told not to laminate one of kind valuable documents because they will eventually degrade but that photogrpahs should last 30-50 years laminated depending on materials used.

I haven't seen any pros framing without glass unless it is canvas or a laminate of some sort. Is this a common practice? (not where I live in BC) UV protection?

John
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framah
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2013, 04:21:36 PM »
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Yeah... the idea of "just framing it" meaning without glass or plexi is purely amateur.

It looks like you're too cheap to protect your work.

You can laminate your images..either paper or canvas and it can have some protection and look better than nothing.

Anything that is matted HAS to be covered with glass or plexi.
Anyone who says otherwise is only kidding themselves and their customers.

If framing paper without glass was a good idea, ALL of the framers would be doing it, and we AREN'T.

Your idea of box mounting with the laminate cover is an ok idea of selling your work without alot of framing costs... realizing that the idea is a lower end method of selling your work.
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bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2013, 05:07:11 PM »
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I do art fairs and am seeing more of those plaque mounted prints.  Have noticed a few things.

The ones on relatively thin boards have tendency to warp, which is very apparent when looking at them on the walls.  Talking about 16 x 20 through 24 x 36 here, on 3/16" through 3/8" panels.  And one artist even complained that several of his panel mounts had warped during the course of a three day show.  These were spotlighted at the show, maybe that's an issue.

But honestly, those panel-mounts look CHEAP!  I believe a lot of potential art buyers would be hesitant to bring such pieces into their decor scheme for that reason.  Would be hard to compete along side properly framed pieces.

The best solution to glare that I know is to use very fine texture canvas with a glossy coating, or coarser textured canvas with a more matte-like coating.  Over-laminates only aggravate glare issues because they are not completely clear, there is a tiny but visible amount of haziness that really shows up when you view them with light coming from approximate eye level.  And I could tell you some juicy stories about rapid in-the-field failure of laminate face-mounted prints sold for big dollars by a really famous photographer.
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jnmoore
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2013, 11:24:48 PM »
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Thanks for the very informative feedback. (bill t. and framah). Warping prints are not good. I bought some aluminum prints from a well known California company and they have all warped somewhat. Not those from Image Wizards (no afilliation).

So far I'm left to continue framing with glass (and printing on aluminum when I can afford it) or maybe try fine texture canvas whick I kinda don't want to do.

If there are other ideas out there please let me know. (We need to figure out a good method to get rid of the glass!)

Thanks again, John
johnagon.com


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