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Author Topic: Baryta roll papers question  (Read 1313 times)
Dale_Cotton2
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« on: May 16, 2013, 11:08:47 AM »
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I have a 3880 and normally use cut sheet paper. I want to print some images longer than the usual 17x22 available here in Canada, so am thinking to buy a roll of Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Baryta then cutting sheets to size as needed. Only rolls I've ever used have been RC and Epson Enhanced Matte (light-weight substrate).

1. Does anyone know whether the coated side will be facing in toward the core or facing out?

2. How much grief from inflicting damage when hand-cutting with an Exacto knife plus straight edge and de-curling am I going to face? I.e. does it take extraordinary care in handling to do this?

3. My guess is that the paper should de-curl fairly easily -- is that true?

The Hahnemuhle is cotton rag, so fairly thin and pliant, but also very expensive. If I could use a cellulose substrate paper that would be less expensive, but the extra stiffness concerns me. (In particular, I'm thinking of Inkpress/Sihl Warm Tone Baryta, which is 15 mil and 290 gsm.)

4. So same three questions re rolls of such stiffness.

Thanks!
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BarbaraArmstrong
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2013, 02:22:15 PM »
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The coated surface for printing is on the outside of the roll.  Instead of using an exacto knife, use an Olfa rotary cutter (get the 45mm size) that quilters use, with a ruler designed for use with this kind of cutter, and a cutting mat.  You will get excellent control, easy to do the cutting, and there won't be any collateral damage to your paper.  Keep your hand on the cutter a little elevated so the cutter is less likely to jump the edge of the ruler, and keep your left hand even with or behind the cutter (and certainly not over it where the blade is exposed).  Close the cutter as soon as you have done using it.  Quilters do this all the time on fabric (multiple layers even), and I have a cutter dedicated for paper, as paper dulls it much more quickly than fabric.  A source to look at is www.keepsakequilting.com.  See their "Tools of the Trade" section. A 6-1/2 x 24-1/2" ruler is $24; the 45mm Olfa cutter is $20.  Oddly, I don't see cutting mats in their catalog.  I'd call and ask.  The self-healing cutting mats are not cheap, but very useful, and necessary for use with the rotary cutter.  The ruler is not just a straight-edge, but has an elevated side (1/8"?) to keep the cutter from jumping the edge.  These tools will work very well for you for many many years.  --Barbara
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JohnBrew
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2013, 02:51:04 PM »
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I used to do this all the time with my 3880 before I bought a 6400 Grin. I took the rolls down to my framer and she cut them to the size I specified. And it was my favorite price - gratis. I used both Photo Rag Baryta and Photo Rag Pearl.
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Dale_Cotton2
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2013, 12:40:22 PM »
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Barbara and John: thanks for the useful responses!
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Sal Baker
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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2013, 08:51:43 PM »
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I cut 17x30 sheets for my 3880 from Canson Platine rolls with no major problems.  I use a Rotatrim to cut and de-curl the sheets with my cheap roller shade device from Home Depot.  Be sure to wear cotton gloves and reverse curl carefully (don't roll too tightly) with thicker papers to avoid creases.

Sal
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Dale_Cotton2
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« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2013, 08:49:01 AM »
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Thanks, Sal! Will keep your advice in mind.
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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 04:11:35 PM »
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Make sure to leave a couple of inches on the back side of the print so as to avoid a head strike because of the curl at the end of the cut sheet. If you cut it to size, the end will snap upwards causing a head strike. Those extra inches will pass smoothly through when the printing is finished and you can trim off with a blade and straight edge, I use my mat cutter.
Don't make this your canvas size,  you don't want the printer to know the paper is longer.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2013, 11:33:15 AM by Bill Koenig » Logged

Bill Koenig,
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