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Author Topic: The Illustrated Book on Scanning  (Read 1586 times)
GerardK
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« on: May 21, 2013, 04:18:32 AM »
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Still want to know how to scan your transparencies and negatives to get the best possible result? I've published a best-practice guide, illustrated with screenshots, of the workflows that I've developed. The guide describes how you can scan your image just once, to capture all possible detail in highlight and shadow areas, without subjective interpretation. The resulting basic scan contains all relevant data, which you can subsequently process to taste without having to re-scan the image. The workflows require a desktop flatbed or film scanner, Photoshop CS or later, VueScan or Silverfast, and the Photoshop plug-in ColorPerfect.

"The Illustrated Book on Scanning" by Gerard Kingma is available from Amazon.com, in paperback and e-book editions at the following link
http://amzn.com/1484137434



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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 06:46:04 AM »
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Hello Gerard,

As a "fellow author" on the topic of scanning (though without your fame in the fine art photographic community), I just wanted to take this opportunity to congratulate you for this publication. I know how much work goes into writing such books, and I wish you every success with it. I have ordered a copy, as I am interested to see how your workflow recommendations would compare or differ with the ones I developed in my ebook on the subject. I can see right away that the purposes of our books are not identical, but there is bound to be coverage of similar subject areas in both.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
GerardK
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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 07:26:17 AM »
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Hello Mark,

Thank you very much for your kind words. I'd love to hear what you think, so please let me know. I shout 'best practice' and then duck and cover, because there's always room for improvement of course, so any input from you would be more than appreciated. Thanks for your order, I hope the guide will be of use to you.
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2013, 07:34:50 AM »
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Hi Gerard,

Sure, let us keep in touch on this. I too smile at the words "best practice" - as we know, there are so many ways of "skinning the cat", (as we say over here), and then some.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
JimAscher
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2013, 09:45:51 AM »
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On the basis of this thread I purchased this book, which on receipt seems to me to be quite excellent in substance and well presented.  However, I was very discouraged to realize that I don't think it will do me much good.  All my medium format negatives are, and my interest is in, black-and-white.  Did I miss somewhere the fact that the book seems to only be about scanning color slides and negatives? 
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Jim Ascher

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GerardK
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« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2013, 09:57:47 AM »
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Dear Jim,

Thanks for your order, I hope you're not too disappointed, I'll try to help if I can.

The essence of the workflow is that the nature of your source material actually doesn't really matter. The point is that you're making a kind of snapshot of your film, without interpreting the contents during the scanning process. You're making a kind of RAW file. I haven't tried this because I don't do B/W, but I think it should be possible to treat your film all the way as a color negative, and then do the B/W conversion at the end in Photoshop. The most important thing is that you capture all the information that the film contains, in the shadows as well as the highlights. ColorPerfect makes that possible if you follow the instructions in the guide. Please experiment with that and let me know how you get on,

Best regards, Gerard Kingma
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JimAscher
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2013, 10:23:31 AM »
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Dear Jim,

Thanks for your order, I hope you're not too disappointed, I'll try to help if I can.

The essence of the workflow is that the nature of your source material actually doesn't really matter. The point is that you're making a kind of snapshot of your film, without interpreting the contents during the scanning process. You're making a kind of RAW file. I haven't tried this because I don't do B/W, but I think it should be possible to treat your film all the way as a color negative, and then do the B/W conversion at the end in Photoshop. The most important thing is that you capture all the information that the film contains, in the shadows as well as the highlights. ColorPerfect makes that possible if you follow the instructions in the guide. Please experiment with that and let me know how you get on,

Best regards, Gerard Kingma

Gerald:  Thanks for your quick and (hopefully) helpful response.  I am currently very immersed in my digital work, and purchased your book with the intent of beginning to scan some of my preferred black-and-white negatives at a later date.  This is just to establish that I likely will not attempt to put into practice your (and the book's) advice until a few months down the road.  Probably not until the fall.  But I will do so, and will report back to you at the time. Thanks again.  Jim 
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Jim Ascher

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GerardK
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2013, 11:07:07 AM »
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OK Jim, best of luck. I'll try to help where I can, I'll be around.

Best regards, Gerard Kingma
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