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Author Topic: What Nikon macro?  (Read 1982 times)
henrikfoto
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« on: May 21, 2013, 11:47:56 AM »
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I have been a Conon-man for many years, but the temptation is now too great.
Tomorrow I will buy a new Nikon D800e and the best possible macro af lens.

But I know nothing about Nikon-lenses.

What is the best macro with af for this camera?

Henrik
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kers
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 12:08:36 PM »
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Not directly responding to your question i would like to say that i very much like my PCE lenses for Macro...
The tilt can be very useful ...also you can make a shift-pano
The lenses go to about 1:1
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Pieter Kers
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langier
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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 02:20:36 PM »
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There are several Micro lenses for the Nikon. What you choose depends upon what you need the lens for.

There's the standard fare for full-frame including 60mm, 105mm, 200mm. If you get lucky on eBay, there was even a great 70-180mm macro zoom (to about 1:2 magnification). There's also the 24mm, 45mm and 85mm PCE lenses that allow your more geometry control and with the shift, create images that you can easily stitch.

Another option is to get one of the premium telephoto zoom lenses (both 70-200 VR and 70-300 VR), and add the Canon 500D close-up diopter to it.

Of course the other option is the higher-end Sigma macro lenses, a few which are pretty good, but I haven't used them.

What you want maybe different than what you need. If you are doing this with your Canon system, there are equivalent options for most of the macros on the Nikon side.

Of course, YRMV and it's up to you to see what works. I'd even venture to say, why not rent what you think you need and see if it does the job?
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Larry Angier
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Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2013, 02:47:26 PM »
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I went for a manual 2.8/105mm AIS Micro Nikkor; never regretted it. You don't need af for close-ups - if anything, I would see it as an additional problem having it. The focus even locks via a little knob... It also works very well outwith the close-up range.

Rob C
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henrikfoto
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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2013, 02:53:23 PM »
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The reason that I want AF is that I want to use the system with a Camranger.

I like to have a little distance to the objects.
Mostly I considder the 105 mm against the 200 mm.
Which of these produces the best resolution?

Henrik
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Rob C
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« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2013, 03:00:21 PM »
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The reason that I want AF is that I want to use the system with a Camranger.

I like to have a little distance to the objects.
Mostly I considder the 105 mm against the 200 mm.
Which of these produces the best resolution?

Henrik

I don't know - never used the 200mm Micro; didn't they make a medical 200mm one too?

I believe that the 70-180mm lens referred to before didn't actually remain at 180mm when you went to that focal length - I believe it became rather shorter.

Rob C
« Last Edit: May 21, 2013, 03:02:41 PM by Rob C » Logged

NancyP
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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2013, 03:34:24 PM »
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I turn the autofocus OFF at macro working distance (0.25x to 1x and beyond). Some people like to use their 100, 105, 150, 180mm macro lens as a portrait lens as well. If you don't plan this use, you don't need AF. What subject do you wish to shoot? Insects need longer focal length (more working distance) because they may get skittish. Bug shooters go for 150, 180, 200mm macro lenses. Dragonfly and butterfly shooters like the Canon 300mm  f/4 which has native maximum magnification of 0.3, enough to get the entire insect to fill the frame. Flowers don't care how close the front element gets. A 50, 60, 65, 70mm lens is fine for flowers.

Do you have a decent recent vintage Canon body? Maybe you shouldn't switch, unless you want the D800/E for landscape or other uses. Canon makes the one and only 1X to 5X macro lens in production, the MP-E 65. The lens is manual focus and does not focus in the non-macro range (no infinity). This replaces the need for bellows or stacked extension tubes for greater than 1:1 photos. Check out any macro forum and you will see photos from the MP-E, or go to myrmecos.net for examples of ant photography. Canon really has excellent macro glass. I use the EF-S 60mm f/2.8, EF 180mm L f/3.5, and the MP-E 65 65mm f/2.8, none of which have image stabilization. One of the top-selling Canon lenses is the 100mm f/2.8 L macro with image stabilization - popular because the lens functions well as an ordinary non-macro medium telephoto as well as macro, and because the image stabilization is useful in the not-quite-macro range.

Nikon had a unique tilt-swing bellows that can be chased down on ebay (if you are lucky): PB4. I am not a Nikon user, so I can't comment with authority. This would be the way to get greater than 1:1 reproduction if you have a Nikon. Novoflex may have a similar TS bellows. Lens for bellows can be a reversed normal (50mm-ish) lens with manual aperture - 100 bucks of lens plus under 10 bucks for adapter.

If you are a novice macro shooter, stay with the 0.3X to 1X range before trying for greater than 1X. Also, put a decent amount of thought into your lighting setup. For lighting ideas, see the Fred Miranda macro forum top thread "Show your set-up" - dozens of store-bought and home-made lighting modifications.
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NancyP
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« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2013, 03:38:04 PM »
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I'd like to add that I shoot on a Canon 60D, which is only APS-C but which has the advantage of an articulating screen, which is helpful when shooting on tripod in odd positions.
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RobSaecker
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« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2013, 03:46:24 PM »
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Michael recommended the Sigma 150 Macro in his D800 review, and on the strength of that I bought one to use on my D7000. I haven't been disappointed.

In my limited experience, the performance of a 105 Micro Nikkor for non-macro images was underwhelming. But that could easily be explained by sample variation and/or operator error. And if you're only going to be using it for macro work, it's beside the point.
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PeterAit
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« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2013, 03:51:59 PM »
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Don't limit yourself to Nikkor lenses. When I was using a D700, I had a Tamron 180mm macro that I liked very much.
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Peter
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jwstl
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« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2013, 04:19:33 PM »
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Michael recommended the Sigma 150 Macro in his D800 review, and on the strength of that I bought one to use on my D7000. I haven't been disappointed.
I have one too and like it very much. I also have the AF-D version of the Nikon 105 2.8 which is smaller and lighter than the Sigma and goes with me when I want to travel lighter.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 09:55:54 AM by jwstl » Logged
Ellis Vener
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« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2013, 07:05:16 PM »
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I'd like to add that I shoot on a Canon 60D, which is only APS-C but which has the advantage of an articulating screen, which is helpful when shooting on tripod in odd positions.
Nancy I like that about the 60D as well, but the CamRanger (which Henrick says he will be using) combined with a tablet or smartphone really ups your  camera placement and remote operation game.

As a macro lens  if you have the working distance in hand the 200mm f/4 Micro-Nikkor is what I would go for. http://slrgear.com/reviews/showproduct.php/product/105/cat/12

You might also consider the AF Zoom Micro-Nikkor 70-180 mm f/4.5-5.6 ED, which is reviewed here: AF Zoom Micro-Nikkor 70-180 mm f/4.5-5.6 ED
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Ellis Vener
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2013, 07:14:02 PM »
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Sorry not autofocus but it really is not needed for macro.
D800e with Zeiss 100 f/2 is as good as it gets.
If you want 1:1 add a tube.
I am printing several flower images 36" X 36" and they are just so sharp.
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Colorado David
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« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2013, 10:37:51 PM »
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Nikon had a unique tilt-swing bellows that can be chased down on ebay (if you are lucky): PB4.

I have that bellows.  It is a wonderful piece of kit.  I haven't used it in years now.  I can't remember for sure, but I think you'd have to put an extension tube on first to mount the bellows just to clear the overhang from the pop-up flash.
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henrikfoto
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« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2013, 02:51:07 AM »
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Nancy I like that about the 60D as well, but the CamRanger (which Henrick says he will be using) combined with a tablet or smartphone really ups your  camera placement and remote operation game.

As a macro lens  if you have the working distance in hand the 200mm f/4 Micro-Nikkor is what I would go for. http://slrgear.com/reviews/showproduct.php/product/105/cat/12

You might also consider the AF Zoom Micro-Nikkor 70-180 mm f/4.5-5.6 ED, which is reviewed here: AF Zoom Micro-Nikkor 70-180 mm f/4.5-5.6 ED



Hi Ellis!

Thanks a lot for your reply. Just what I needed.
I have ordered the CamRanger and am very excited to try it out.

Henrik
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HSakols
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« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2013, 09:52:08 AM »
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I still could not live without my Nikon 105 AFD.  It is plenty sharp and shines on my d800. I also have a MF 200 f 4 macro which is great for keeping a little distance.
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AFairley
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« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2013, 12:58:18 PM »
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I prefer shorter focal length macros for the kind of stuff I use them for (which is not extreme closeups of bugs or flowers).  The best bang for the buck out there IMO is the 55mm f2.8 AF Micro Nikkor you can pick up used for around $200; the optics are the same as the 55mm F2.8 Micro Nikko AIS, and it will hit 1:1.
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orchidblooms
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« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2013, 01:44:43 PM »
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I use the zeiss 100 and the new 135 APO with the d800e just ordered a novoflex focus rail.... the xl long one...
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BobDavid
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« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2013, 10:14:58 PM »
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The 60mm f/2.8 G Nikon macro is a masterpiece. It is the best lens I own in terms of overall sharpness, lack of CA and linear distortion. It is a bargain. It is also able to focus at 1:1.
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elf
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« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2013, 12:52:32 AM »
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I'm surprised anyone would pick a Nikon over Canon for macro work.  The MPE-65 and electronic first curtain shutter combination is hard to beat.
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